2007-2011 idp consolidated file

Jul 1, 2006 - It took into consideration the 2006 Local Government Manifesto of the ANC. • Further ...... http://www.undmtp.org/english/Overview/ove...

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Executive Summary On 5 December 2000, nine towns (Alberton, Benoni, Boksburg, Brakpan, Edenvale, Germiston, Kempton Park, Nigel and Springs) and two administrations in the Eastern region of Gauteng were amalgamated and conferred metropolitan status. These towns were in fierce competition with each other to access resources and promote development. All the towns had classical dormitory townships, with a large portion of the population living in dense and under-serviced conditions. The base of the economy in the geographic area of the east rand is the industries and factories that were spurred by mining activity. A well-developed transport infrastructure emerged, which takes air, rail and road into account. In keeping with the apartheid design, this favoured the movement of goods and services rather than the mobility of people and residents. The concentrated presence of production plants in the Metropole brought about a cluster of logistics, warehousing and distribution outlets in the value chain of production and supply. This collective contribution to the national economy led to the region being consolidated as a metropolitan area. One of the key challenges that faced the Metropolitan Municipality was the integration of the disparate and rival economic strategies and planning policies. In November 2002 a medium-term (10-15 year) economic strategy was developed and submitted to National Treasury. By February 2003 a regional macro economic strategy was adopted to guide the development of the economy and society, and placed into the IDP. The level of industrialisation in the area attracts many people from all parts of the country and continent into the area to look for opportunities. This has led to a high population density and increased migration into the region. The consolidation of all the towns highlighted the pressures on land and management of the environment, as well as the challenges relating to the development of sustainable human settlements and a robust local economy. There are six metropolitan municipalities in the country. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) is one of Gauteng’s three metropolitan municipalities. It is different from other municipalities in that it does not have a dominant urban core but instead consists of nine small town centres, with major decentralised nodes, such as the East Rand Mall and the Bedfordview Wadeville Alrode Industrial Corridor, and the OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA) complex. Ekurhuleni’s recent past is characterised by many facets, including militant labour action for recognition of worker rights, and for black workers to organise themselves into unions, as well as protracted community struggles for housing, democratic education and an end to apartheid. Violence broke out in the 1980s and the early part of the 1990s when peaceful protests were curbed by state security. The choice of Ekurhuleni, ‘the place of peace’, as the new name for the east rand is a realisation that the violent past is over and a new beginning is being forged. The area is still challenged by racial and cultural integration issues. A number of towns in the Metropole are more than 100 years old. To forge one common identity for the region requires buy-

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in and investment from all groups in equal parts, and this is a slow process. Class fault lines still separate rich and poor in various suburbs, towns and organisations. These race, class and cultural divisions also manifest in service delivery and development choices, and in the ability of the administration and leadership to devise interventions to bring about change and meaningful transformation. Metropolitan areas in South Africa have generally developed around a primary core area or Central Business District (CBD), giving identity to these areas. Cape Town, Nelson Mandela, eTekwini, Johannesburg and Tshwane are typical of metropolitan areas that have, over time, developed multi-nodal urban systems with a coherent dominant urban core surrounded by a number of peripheral urban nodes. The Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy 2025, adopted in 2005, indicates that Ekurhuleni lacks a clear identity and primary core urban area, and that the town centres are in decline. It must be noted that the region has multiple nodes and new approaches to economic and urban regeneration need to be developed as the multiple nodes, in essence, form the comparative advantage of the region. The Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy 2025 calls for the development of Germiston as the administrative capital of Ekurhuleni. This requires that Germiston not only has to re-imagine itself as the symbolic centre, but must also present a range of urban development opportunities for the area, and have radials that link Ekurhuleni as one, contiguous unit. The Germiston urban centre provides an opportunity for regeneration creating an identity around existing cultural, social, economic and physical assets within the inner city. The inner city area has been designated to be an urban tax development zone. To develop the economy and harness the investments made by government in infrastructure and transport, through its parastatals in the transport sector, a programme to consolidate the economic linkages in the CBD was undertaken in 2006. One of the key objectives of the Gauteng city-region perspective is: “To build Gauteng as an integrated and globally competitive region, where the economic activities of the different parts of the province complement each other in consolidating Gauteng as an economic hub of Africa and an internationally recognised global city-region.” The main thrust of the city-region perspective is to: o strengthen overall governance within the region through improving coordination in areas of planning and strategy formulation, o identify flagship projects which would improve the profile of the city-region, o minimise inter-municipal competition by encouraging all stakeholders to think regionally in ‘city-region’ terms, and o ensure that outputs are measured and tracked according to the overall objectives for the region. It is against this background that Germiston was identified as the administrative capital of Ekurhuleni, to be repositioned as a major player within the Gauteng city-region. A new Council Chamber has been completed and the headquarters of the Metro will in time be located in Germiston. These constitute the major investment of local government in this intervention.

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Social and economic research flowing from this intervention will contribute directly to enhancing current initiatives to strengthen Gauteng’s position in the world hierarchy of global cities. In advancing the development of Ekurhuleni within the concept of the Gauteng city-region, and in pursuance of this objective, a massive urban renewal programme aimed at developing functional, sustainable and attractive urban areas to address decaying inner-city and poorly performing urban areas has been embarked upon. Ekurhuleni is a sprawling 1 889 km area that is home to a population of close on 3 million people, who represent every ethnic group in South Africa, and hosts diverse international cultures. The Metro is a partnership that works, and it aims to be the smart, creative and developmental city of South Africa. To achieve this, the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality works with values of Performance Excellence, Integrity, Community Centeredness, Transparency and Co-operative Governance. Residents of Ekurhuleni have a responsibility to protect the investments made into infrastructure. This can only be achieved through a social contract with residents. The continued illegal dumping of waste, especially on street corners and open spaces, is unproductive and places an unnecessary burden on scarce resources that could be better used elsewhere. A collective effort is needed to create a clean city. Ward Councillors, supported by the Ward Committees, are the leaders in the quest to work towards keeping Ekurhuleni clean. All Wards have commenced programmes to build pride in Ekurhuleni and to develop programmes to educate our communities. As Ekurhuleni begins to define basic standards for Wards and facilities necessary to build better communities, resources need to be assigned to deal with townships that are not in the Gauteng government’s programme. This IDP has programmes for the extension of infrastructure linked to the housing programme to all areas which are still not properly serviced; it has specific plans to improve and extend service delivery linked to refuse removal, and to deliver on the commitment made to provide free basic services. All of these provide for realistic local economic development plans, which include the improvement and provision of the required economic infrastructure and the encouragement of micro, small and medium businesses. During the period 2007-2011, social transformation will be undertaken through a process of building sustainable communities and breaking new ground to bring about integrated communities and reverse apartheid spatial planning. The bucket system has been eradicated in all formal settlements in Ekurhuleni, in line with the national promise that no community will use the bucket system by 2007; however, there are still communities who do not have proper and adequate sanitation for a number of reasons. In keeping with the promise that all communities will have access to clean water and decent sanitation by 2010, and that all houses will have access to electricity by 2012, during 2007 –2008 the following will be undertaken as part of the developmental engagement with Wards and citizens: •

An audit of all areas that do not have access to clean water and decent sanitation in the region, and the status of current plans to ensure clean water and decent sanitation in these areas. The audit will include possible new areas to be developed that might need to be provided with clean water and decent sanitation. 3



Development of a comprehensive plan to ensure access to clean water and decent sanitation by 2010 in the areas identified above. A multi-year budget reflecting how clean water and decent sanitation will be accessed in these communities by 2010.



Collection of data on households in the region that do not have access to electricity and the status of current plans to ensure all houses will have access to electricity. The data to include possible new areas to be developed that might need to be provided with access to electricity.



Development of a plan to ensure that all houses will have access to electricity by 2010 in the areas identified above. Develop a multi-year budget reflecting how electricity will be accessed in these communities by 2012.

As part of Premier Mbhazima Shilowa’s Priority 20 Townships Initiative, which is intended to be completed by 2009, the transformation of Daveyton, Katlehong, Kwa-Thema, Duduza, Tsakane, Thembisa and Wattville into vibrant, dynamic and sustainable communities - where people live with decent social amenities and access to economic opportunities - has commenced. This work is assisting to decisively break the back of apartheid planning and underdevelopment, and is reshaping the built environment with appropriate linkages to create one identity. In the period 20072011, in partnership with the Gauteng Province, a new hospital in Vosloorus will be constructed to replace the Natalspruit Hospital, which has a sinkhole and is unsafe. To make local government more accessible to our citizens, 17 Customer Care Centres in Thembisa; Kempton Park; Edenvale; Thokoza; Katlehong; Vosloorus; Germiston; Alberton; Tsakane; Duduza; Nigel; Daveyton; Kwa-Thema; Springs; Brakpan; Benoni and Boksburg will be developed, with uniform standards to ensure that the same level of service to citizens is delivered. All Customer Care Centres will have access to functional departments and be in contact via the ICT infrastructure to deliver direct services to citizens. We will be improving our complaints centre response to provide a 24-hour service to all citizens. This initiative will make Batho Pele a living reality. The presence of well-resourced municipal offices in areas where the majority of our people live will be a historic break with the legacy we inherited. This will be our shared destiny, where municipal offices will not only be in the CBDs of our towns, but also in the townships. Our turnaround time in addressing problems is hampered by a shortage of expertise. We will be addressing the skills shortage of plumbers, technicians and engineers through prioritising these skills in learnerships and improving competency levels. This is an indication of alignment with AsgiSA, wherein the Joint Initiative For Priority Skills Acquisition (JIPSA) was set up to focus on skills and education initiatives directed at addressing the shortage of suitably qualified labour. In the workplace, training of officials is being implemented to work on programme objectives and deliverables that take the critical need for skills as identified by JIPSA into account – in the transport, communication, energy complex, as well as town, city and regional planning, managerial, artisan and technical skills. In March 2006 a new set of political representatives was elected and a new phase of governance commenced. During 2007 to 2010 we will embark on strengthening the system of local government

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as a critical step to enhancing service delivery. The strengthening of local government is not only about the state structures, but more importantly, it is about the functioning of Councillors and Ward Committees, both of which have to maintain the closest contact with the residents of their Wards and respond to their needs. This is a critical element in ensuring that our Municipality discharges its responsibilities to assist in the process of the speedy eradication of the legacy of the past. To achieve this, forums of Ward Councillors and Ward Committees to meet with management and the executive have been set down. Serious attention has been paid to the objective of achieving gender parity in the deployment of Councillors, and representation of women in Council is 50%. This must become a symbol for society to follow and give the women of Ekurhuleni an equal space in society to interact fully and to make a full contribution to the task of uniting our people. From 2007 to 2011, the consolidation of the role of women in Ekurhuleni, as equal partners in society, will be the task of the Gender Committee. The emancipation of women must be on all fronts: politics, education and culture, sport, the economy and in the home. Ekurhuleni is committed to helping young people to become modern professionals and skilled workers. We have to correct the long legacy of discriminatory economic and social development that maintained a large reservoir of cheap, unskilled black labour, and excluded the black masses from the educational and vocational opportunities required by modern societies and economies. Our plan for 2007 to 2011 in Ekurhuleni is also aimed at improving the lives of young people by providing a better environment for teaching skills and employment opportunities. To make sure that this happens, youth development will be a critical part of the programme and a Youth Committee has been established to oversee this. During 2007 to 2011, a comprehensive and integrated approach to dealing with HIV and AIDS in the region will be realised. Managing the impact of HIV and AIDS remains a fundamental challenge. This will be taken up through a Local AIDS Council, as well as alignment of local programmes to the Provincial Strategy, and will include developing a programme to support those who are infected and affected by this pandemic. This will be reflected in a strengthened partnership with civil society. The Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy 2025 guides us as to the strategic direction to be taken to create a united, integrated, well-developed and prosperous area. The Growth and Development Strategy points to the linkages between infrastructure development and the environment needed to build social cohesion and sustainable economic development. To ensure that everyone works together to build better communities, Ekurhuleni hosted a Growth and Development Summit, on 1 and 2 September 2006, to consolidate the various forums on the economy and the outreach programmes on housing. This Summit brought together representatives of the social partners - government, business, labour and community organisations - to develop concrete steps towards higher rates of local economic growth and poverty-reduction. Work with National and Provincial government to unpack specific interventions to ensure the success of AsgiSA - including reducing unemployment levels and achieving higher rates of growth, thereby producing more of the wealth needed to confront the challenges of growth and development - has been in place since 2003. In this process, business has been encouraged to add value to the mineral resources our country has supplied to the rest of the world for a century5

and-a-half. By transforming raw materials into processed, higher-value products, we will change the historic colonial relationship between our country and the developed North, which made us an exporter of raw materials and an importer of manufactured goods. Every mine-shaft sunk anywhere in the world uses some product from Ekurhuleni. We want to retain and increase this. Two local companies, Exxaro and Impala Platinum, in partnership with government, have established a SEDA Ekurhuleni Base Metal Incubator in Springs to achieve this goal. This incubator will refurbish the old unused mine hostels to house an incubator for small businesses in the value chain of the mining services industry by producing base metals useful to the manufacturing industry. The continued analysis of the economy covers the priority programmes of government as set out in AsgiSA. The research work carried out on the Ekurhuleni economy has informed national policy shifts, notably the industrial policy of DTI, as well as the SEO infrastructure programme. Some initiatives have provincial and national budget allocations and support, while others are still in development. Together with national and provincial government, as well as local manufacturers, the challenge of meeting the increase in demand for capital goods, machinery and equipment, electrical equipment, construction activities and transport equipment has been focused on. This increased demand is a result of the SOE’s investment programmes of R133.8 billion which covers 2005-2010. This investment is intended not only to address the severe backlog of logistics and energy infrastructure and capacity requirements in South Africa, but also to provide a base upon which to attract future Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and consolidate private sector investment. In contributing to the provincial target of Economic Growth Rate of 8% by 2014, and in support of our economic readiness for the World Cup in 2010, we have - in partnership with the Airports Company of South Africa (ACSA) - begun to consider the maximisation of the OR Tambo International Airport as a major entry point into our country. Leveraging from the provincial Gautrain project, we will be finalising plans for the development of an integrated transportation system linking rail, road and air transportation, and emphasising the development of a metro bus system. Our approach to growing the local economy must ensure support of small business development and the development of required skills. From 2007 to 2011, greater emphasis will be placed on programmes aimed at empowering local entrepreneurs through facilitating a platform for national and provincial programmes to improve the local economy and make it more accessible to the majority of our citizens. In this respect the provincial flagship programme Gauteng Enterprise Propeller and the SEDA have begun to extend their reach and range to small businesses in Ekurhuleni to empower and develop local entrepreneurs. Linkages to the local business linkage centres that are part of our partnership with the Ekurhuleni Business Association will be strengthened. Provincial programmes and the work of agencies, especially with respect to the development of the economy and choices, need to feature in the spatial plans. The current programmes of provincial agencies are not fully aligned to provincial and local strategies. There is much confusion and it appears that some of the agencies are duplicating the LED function. The macro economic strategy was developed in 2002 and adopted in 2003. However, its sentiments, including diversification through promoting high-yielding agricultural land, the use of rehabilitated mining land and development zones, are not echoed in the SDF. This gap has caused serious delays in finalising

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investments and cementing linkages to building a concrete programme of engagement for the city region. The development of stadiums for the 2010 Soccer World Cup is a part of the MIG programmes and is taken up in the overall analysis of the inputs required for construction with respect to backlogs on housing and infrastructure. With respect to the economic and spatial implications, the more important aspect of transport needs to be detailed. The spill-over with respect to hospitality is also important for the municipality. As the municipality is not a key choice for the 2010 World Cup, the aspects of legacy and infill-linked investments, as well as the leveraging of the ICT infrastructure, are under consideration, as these would have greater and more medium- and long-term economic benefits. A partnership with Blue IQ to implement the Blue Umbrella project to make Gauteng a connected city region is underway. The provision and maintenance of infrastructure, transport and mobility for the movement of goods, services and people are contained in the sector plans. Exit mechanisms for people who live in poverty are on plan in the various departmental strategies but are not aligned, and with respect to housing provision, this is directly linked to transfer of land ownership, which has the effect of increasing the tax base in the region. All departments of the municipality are required to implement interventions in the economy. In particular, the land use management, spatial planning and environment management need to aggregate towards a holistic strategic view of the medium-term economic growth and sustainable development of the region. In addition the capability of industry to supply cement, bricks, steel, pumps and valves needed for construction work needs to be seriously considered. A long-term view of the project management and specialised skills needed to execute infrastructure projects is vital for planning and budgeting. The medium-term capital investment programme needs to be aligned to cover strategic projects to stimulate the economy and development of the region. Achieving this is not merely a budgeting function nor an IDP compliance process. It is about making strategic and informed choices. To implement this within a growth path, provincial and national funding into the region needs to be sought and aligned. From 2000 to 2005, during the phase of stabilisation and consolidation of municipalities, the following was achieved:  The rates and taxes of the nine towns were integrated and a uniform rates and tariff structure was adopted. In-built in the tariff structure is a percentage for infrastructure refurbishment.  The by-laws of the nine different towns were consolidated with the integration of the various functions and a uniform set of by-laws per function is in place.  11 financial systems were consolidated. By 2003 a consolidated balance sheet was in place.  11 HR systems were consolidated and 11 payrolls were integrated.  One common billing and metering system was implemented. 7

 A uniform budgeting model was adopted. A metro-wide SDF was adopted and an IDP was developed from 2002 onwards.  The ward committee system was set up in 88 wards during 2001 and participatory approaches to governance were put into place.  Free basic services have been instituted, even in areas that are serviced by Eskom, and the bucket system has been eradicated.  All informal settlements have been tagged and recorded. 112 informal settlements have been counted and 8 have been eradicated with flagship projects on the People’s Housing Project.  The hostels in the area have been assessed and some will be decanted.  All mine dumps in the area have been tagged and a programme to unlock the land has been instituted.  An Environmental Management Plan as well as an Air Quality plan has been adopted.  The fundamentally undemocratic workplace was reconstituted and from 2001 onwards a more democratic workplace was instituted. The workforce was integrated and consultative and participatory methods to change the rule-based processes were adopted.  New functions, such as Local Economic Development, Housing, Tourism and Metro Police, were established and capacitated.  A total of 13 650 staff from the 11 entities were placed. A structure was adopted in July 2002. By December 2003 the placement was completed. 1500 disputes were recorded in this process. By 2004, 90% of the disputes were resolved.  In 2000 the workforce constituted 35% women. By 2005 this figure has been brought to 50%. Despite these strides there are a number of challenges still facing the municipality:  The racial stratification of the workforce, that is, white male at upper and middle management as per the old apartheid pattern, remains.  The consolidation of old township schemes remains a challenge and this hampers development applications from the private sector.  The protection of agricultural land and sensitive environmental areas is still to be achieved.  Acquisition of land for human settlements and the infrastructure development for public housing programmes remains an ongoing challenge.  Public transport planning and implementation to ensure mobility of people is still to be achieved.  Project management of capital projects linked to infrastructure development requires additional skilling and capacity.  The development of a centre for administration, one identity for the region and accessibility of services closer to communities remains a key challenge. Growth in the economy is about industries harnessing new techniques which fit in with the biodiversity of the region to bring about sustainable development. Growth in society is when all people benefit equally. Development is about industries creating the space for cultural diversity to flourish, and for society to create a future that leads to continued life and improved quality. A future

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that is sustainable. The regional macro economic strategy adopted by Ekurhuleni takes this into account. The local economic development count and impact analysis with respect to the municipal capital investment programme - the investment in infrastructure such as roads, electricity, water, sanitation, land fill sites, sports facilities, community halls, clinics, development of parks and cemeteries or provision of housing as well as the social investment in health services, information services, cultural and recreational services - remains a challenge. It is only with alignment of planning and delivery that a count of poverty reduction and job creation as well as fluctuations in household income can be seriously considered. The development of credible and measurable indicators will be the focus of work over the period 2007-2011. On 2,3 and 4 March 2007, a mayoral strategic session took place. At this session the Growth and Development Strategic Agenda 2025, adopted by Council in November 2005; the outcomes of the Growth and Development Summit, as contained in the declaration adopted on 2 September 2006; the five-year plan presented to Council on 29 June 2006 and the IDP 2006-2010 were considered. The team of senior managers and MMCs has deliberated on the arduous task ahead and has committed to delivery work in an integrated and consolidated manner. In this respect institutional transformation to give impetus to the principles of Batho Pele, front line delivery and responsiveness in Customer Care Centres, will be one of the key matters that will be focused on. Institutional transformation will be in line with the Premier’s call for a healthy, skilled and productive workforce. In the area of social and economic transformation the commitment made by the President, and later reinforced by the Premier, is on improving the lives, of women, youth and people with disabilities, and ensuring their inclusion in society and the economy. From March 2007 a consolidated Ekurhuleni Expanded Public Works Programme has been implemented, aimed at meeting the targets for EPWP as announced by the Premier: 40% women, 30% youth and 2% people with disabilities. This programme will make a concerted effort to link work opportunities and appropriate skills development to the indigent households in Ekurhuleni. In focusing our efforts more effectively on Infrastructure development and service delivery, our main thrust will continue to be the development of sustainable human settlements with transport linkages and appropriate facilities. All of this would not be possible if efforts to improve payment levels are not made, and if the spending on the budget allocations are not planned as well as executed in a more efficient manner. From the strategic session that assessed the first year in government after the local government election 2006, it is evident that we have a team that is willing to walk the talk and go the extra mile to achieve our vision and mission.

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CHAPTER 1:

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background Integrated development planning is a process through which municipalities prepare a strategic development plan which extends over a five-year period. The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) is a product of the IDP process. The EMM IDP is the principal strategic planning instrument which guides and informs all planning, budgeting, management and decision–making processes in the municipality. Through integrated development planning, which necessitates the involvement of all relevant stakeholders, a municipality : • • • • •

identifies its key development priorities; formulates a clear vision, mission and values; formulates appropriate strategies; develops the appropriate organisational structure and systems to realise the vision and mission; and aligns resources with the developmental priorities.

In terms of the Systems Act, all municipalities have to undertake an IDP process to produce IDPs. As the IDP is a legislative requirement, it has legal status and supersedes all other plans that guide development at local government level. In a nutshell, the IDP process entails an assessment of the existing level of development and the identification of key development priorities. The vision and mission statements for the long-term development flow from the aforesaid, with specific reference to critical developmental and internal transformational needs. The development strategies and objectives will be directed at bridging the gap between the existing level of development and the vision and mission. A very critical phase of the IDP process is to link planning to the municipal budget (i.e. allocating internal or external funding to the identified projects), because this will ensure that the IDP directs the development and implementation of projects. 1.2

The Agenda

During the past five years we have made definite progress in enabling the people of this region to enjoy the fruits of liberation and democracy. We have seen substantial improvements made in providing healthcare, building houses and providing water, electricity and sanitation. We have laid a solid foundation and are on course to improve the lives of our communities. As we celebrate the change in our communities, we are also aware of the many challenges we still face. Our fight against poverty and underdevelopment needs to be further intensified. Our responsibility as a sphere of government is to ensure that the quality of life of all who live and work in Ekurhuleni is improved. We will continue to engage in both progressive and meaningful discussions with our communities to shape a clear path from which governance and development will draw guidance and direction. The Council will continue to pursue and encourage community participation programmes to ensure our plans are in line with community needs. New Ward Councillors were elected and we continued working with the Ward Committees that served the communities in the past, and whose participation and contribution assisted the EMM to prepare this IDP and budget. The process of re-election of Ward Committees has started and these will be in place by April 2007. We have a responsibility to contribute to the process of transforming the lives of our people from conditions of abject poverty and underdevelopment. In our fight against poverty, racism and underdevelopment, we are committed to ensuring that equitable service delivery becomes the norm in Ekurhuleni and, as is clearly

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evident from this report, we have taken significant strides towards making this a reality. The actions of the EMM have, to date, improved the lives of many, most notably those who have been neglected in the past. Although a strong foundation has been laid, we will have to be focused and committed to ensure that we remain on track in the transformation of the EMM and our communities. Some of the challenges that still continue to face us include:           

continuously working towards the implementation of the GDS; alignment of the budget (specifically the operational budget to the IDP); ward-based planning; implementing strict credit control; accelerating and improving service delivery; urban regeneration/renewal; improving community/stakeholder participation; Ward Committee support; facilitating economic and social development; job creation; and improving inter-governmental relations and aligning policies to provincial and national government.

The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality programme during the next four years must therefore focus on the following: Social Transformation: Building Sustainable Communities: • • • • • • • • •

The bucket system for sanitation has been eradicated and our sanitation network is being expanded to serve the residents of Ekurhuleni. All communities will have access to clean water and decent sanitation by 2010. All houses will have access to electricity by 2012. There is universal provision of free basic services. Improve the way government provides housing, to ensure better quality houses closer to economic opportunities, and combat corruption in the administration of waiting lists. Create safety and security for communities, including plans to deal with disasters and emergencies. Utilise sports, recreation, arts and culture for social and physical renewal and to build a single identity for the Ekurhuleni community. Manage the environment, including dealing with dolomite. Develop an integrated transportation system linking rail, road and air transportation, and emphasising the development of a metro bus system.

Infrastructure Development: •

• •

Implement large projects that will help create more work opportunities and coordinate these projects from national and provincial governments, e.g. Zivuseni; use the approach of the Expanded Public Works Programme to provide infrastructure; pool resources to build more and better roads, infrastructure for water, storm water and sanitation, and clinics where they are needed. Land release and management for human settlement, urban agriculture and economic activity. Urban renewal programme to rebuild the City of Ekurhuleni.

Provincial Government Programme

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20 Townships Initiative: The project aims to “decisively break the back of Apartheid planning and underdevelopment and continue to transform our townships into vibrant, dynamic and sustainable communities where people live with decent social amenities and access to economic opportunities.” In Ekurhuleni the townships that have been identified are Daveyton, Katlehong, Kwa-Thema, Duduza, Tsakane, Thembisa and Wattville. For the success of the initiative the following needs to be done: o The concept of a vibrant, dynamic and sustainable township must be defined further. o Further funding must be galvanised by EMM for the success of the initiative. o Programmes must be developed for the other townships not mentioned. o The project must be completed by 2009. Building of Clinics and Hospitals: Construction of a new hospital, a replacement for the Natalspruit Hospital, to take place in Vosloorus

Economic Growth • • •

Develop and ensure growth, investment and management of the local economy to unleash the potential of the Ekurhuleni economy, and its contribution in the Provincial economy. Support small business development and ensure development of required skills. Develop and manage programmes for the empowerment of local entrepreneurs.

National Government and GPG Plans: • •

Provincial Economic Growth of 8%: While the national target for economic growth is 6%, the Gauteng Provincial Growth and Development Strategy target is to grow the provincial economy to at least 8% by 2014, a target that EMM economic plans must assist to achieve. O R Tambo IDZ: Work to advance the government’s plans to “pursue further development of the O R Tambo IDZ as a specialised export-orientated growth centre with significant potential to bolster investment and high value-added manufacturing linked to the airport as part of the projects outlined in ASGISA.”

Institutional Transformation: • • • • •

Service provision and accessibility of Council to communities. Advance legal requirements on achieving equity and promoting good labour relations. Develop and implement a plan to effectively utilise the Capital Investment Programme. Strengthen Ward Committees, including involvement and understanding by communities of the work/role of the Municipality. Implement effective programmes on Councillor support.

People’s Participation in Local Government: •



Summit for Growth and Development: The summit is aimed at ensuring that “everyone pulls in the same direction in building better communities.” The summit shall “bring together social partners – government, business, labour and community organisations – to develop concrete steps towards higher rates of local economic growth and poverty reduction.” The Summit was convened on 1 and 2 September 2006 and the process of consolidating the input received attention through the key departments of Housing, Infrastructure Services, Economic Development and City Development. A consolidated report will be finalised in due course.

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Development of IDP and Budget: • • • •

The 2006/07 IDPs of the EMM must be reviewed in line with the GDS 2025 that was adopted in November 2005. It took into consideration the 2006 Local Government Manifesto of the ANC. Further reviews from 2007 must also incorporate the outcomes of the Growth and Development Summit that was held in 2006. Linked to this shall be the development of annual medium term budgets.

Establishment of Ward Committees: •

The EMM has resolved that elections for Ward Committees must take place twice within a term of Council. These new Ward Committees will be in place by the end of March 2007.

With regard to these challenges, we are proud to have already put processes and systems in place that will serve as a strong basis to start addressing them. We are also confident that, in partnership with our communities, we will address these challenges with the strong leadership and quiet determination that is required. We see these not as insurmountable obstacles or problems but rather as challenges we are eager to meet as we remain steadfast in our commitment to delivering our best for the benefit of the people of Ekurhuleni.

The IDP / Budget Process Plan is reflected hereunder.

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2006-2007 Process Plan for the review of the IDP and the preparation of the Budget

Action

July06

Aug06

Sep06

Oct06

Nov06

Dec06

Jan07

Feb07

Mar07

Apr07

May07

Public Participation: Departments on implementation of adopted IDP and Budget to Ward Committees Evaluate Project implementation and gather community input into the Budget Departments review Departmental Plans in line with EMMGDS and Growth and Development Summit Resolutions Budget Assessment Team (BAT) Workshop Issue Budget Instruction to departments Workshop with Departments re: IDP and Budget Compilation of Draft Capital and Operating Budgets by Departments - All inputs to be provided to Budget Office Growth and Development Summit Public Participation: Regional Broader Forum Meetings Budget Assessment Team to scrutinise Operating and Capital Budget Municipal Entities to present Draft Budgets to BAT Tariff Task Team to Present Draft Tariffs to BAT BAT to consider Draft IDP & Budget Portfolio Committees to consider Draft IDP, Budget Mayoral Committee to consider Draft IDP, Budget Draft IDP & Budget tabled in terms of MFMA to Council

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Jun07

Action Submit Draft IDP to MEC for comments Publish draft IDP for comment Public Participation on Draft IDP and Budget

July06

Aug06

Sep06

Oct06

Nov06

Dec06

Jan07

Feb07

Mar07

Apr07

May07

Budget Conference with all Councillors Consider comments (MEC and Public) Final IDP to be considered by Mayoral Committee and Council Submit approved review IDP to MEC Publish notice on approved IDP Final Budget to be considered by all Portfolio Committees Final Tariffs & Budget considered by Mayoral Committee Final Tariffs & Budget considered by Council Submit Budget, IDP, SDBIP and Performance Agreements and returns to National and Provincial Treasury Public Participation - regional broader forum meetings Information on website * Note: Budget will include all budget-related policies

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Jun07

The graphic illustration below depicts the strategic process that was followed to review the IDP and to prepare the budget. IDP • Key Performance Areas • Strategic Objectives National Priorities: • Key Performance • NSDP indicators • SON Address • Measurable Targets • National Programmes Strategic Focus Areas • • Provincial Priorities 1. • PGDS 2014 • Provincial Programmes • MEC Comments

STRATEGIC APPROACH/ CONTEXT

• •

Infrastructure and Services Economic Transformation Social Transformation Institutional Transformation

18 GDS 2025 Specific Focus Areas

GDS 2025 •



EMM SDF

Community Needs

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Clear City Identity Spatial Development Roads & Transport Service Infrastructure Environmental Management Urban Renewal ICT Infrastructure Economic Diversification Job Creation Skills Development Tourism Promotion Investment Promotion Economic Transformation Poverty & Unemployment Human Settlements Healthcare and Facilities Safety & Security Parks, Sport & Recreational Facilities.

IDP Programmes and16 Projects

1.3 Comments of the MEC for Local Government of the Gauteng Provincial Government on the 20062010 IDP The comments received from the MEC on the 2006-2010 EMM IDP were as follows: “In terms of Sections 32 of the MSA, I have concluded that there is no issue that requires amendment to the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s (EMM) IDP. Nevertheless, informed by the issues and commitments that were made in the course of the 2006 IDP engagement process, and in the spirit of improving intergovernmental coordination and alignment, I hereby provide the following comments in relation to the final Council approved IDP. a)

I would like to commend the EMM for taking into account and addressing the issues that were raised as part of my comments on the 2005/06 IDP, and congratulate the EMM for improving its ability to comply with legislative requirements relating to the IDP.

b)

In drafting its IDP, the municipality has followed a process that is largely compliant with the MSA. In particular, it is noteworthy that the EMM has made great strides in terms of popular participation in development planning and IDP formulation. Furthermore, the EMM can be applauded for the manner in which consultation and stakeholder engagement processes are managed.

c)

We are of the view that the EMM IDP document serves as a best practice benchmark for municipalities in the province and the country as a whole. Not only is the document readable and easy to follow, but it contains a comprehensive economic analysis of the region and establishes very good linkages between the various elements of the IDP. The EMM can also be commended for adopting an outward-looking approach in developing the IDP, which engages with the need to align municipal planning with national and provincial policies. In respect of these best practices, we suggest that the municipality give thought as to how we can share these achievements and learning experiences of the EMM with other municipalities in the province. The DLG wishes to commit itself to ensuring that these best practices are shared across the province.

d)

While the IDP is not in direct conflict with development plans of any of its neighbours or those of other spheres of government, we have nevertheless observed that the interaction between adjacent municipalities in the context of the IDP process continues to be very limited. In the context of the Gauteng Provincial Government's commitment to building a globally competitive city region, it will be critical that we improve interaction between municipalities, with a view to enhancing the horizontal alignment and harmonisation of our plans.

e)

Although there is a need to improve horizontal alignment, we are pleased with EMM's effort to build inter-municipal planning, which is reflected in the IDP through the development of the R21 corridor across Tshwane and Ekurhuleni.

f)

The IDP demonstrates engagement with national and provincial policies and priorities. Nevertheless, to build IDPs as an expression of the plans of all spheres of government, we will need to improve our coordination and promote better vertical alignment. As we prepare for the 2007 IDP review we must seek to strengthen harmonisation between the EMM 2025 Growth and Development Strategy (GDS), the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy (PGDS), the Gauteng City Region perspective (GCR) and the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative of South Africa (ASGI-SA). In particular, the Department of Economic Development (DED) has committed itself to stronger

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engagement with municipalities in respect of the relationship between IDPs and national and provincial spatial and economic perspectives. g)

In order to take advantage of the agricultural sector's potential for growth, job creation and economic empowerment, a comprehensive provincial Agricultural Development Strategy has been completed. This intervention seeks to extend support for emerging farmers and to boost value added production, particularly in bio-technology and agro-processing, as well as make Gauteng a centre of excellence for smallholder farming with a focus on high value and niche market crops. It is not clear in the EMM IDP whether the municipality has engaged with this policy sufficiently. In preparing for the next IDP review process the municipality needs to ensure that it does so in order to develop common responses that are appropriate in addressing issues of urban agriculture and small-scale farming. In this regard further engagement with the Gauteng Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Environment (GDACE) is advised.

h)

In the 2005/06 IDP commenting process, I raised concerns regarding the municipality’s slow progress in the implementation of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) and capital projects, which could address the issues of job creation through the Expanded Public Works Programme. Sadly, the current IDP does not indicate what interventions have been put in place to fast track the utilisation of MIG funding.

i)

We would like to encourage the municipality to continue to work closely with the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) around the revision of the Water Services Development Plan (WSDP). Furthermore, input towards a water conservation and demand management plan for the Province will be essential as part of our ongoing efforts to address the challenge of water losses in Gauteng.

j)

It is commendable that the EMM has a Disaster Management Plan in place. However, more work is required to link the Disaster Management Plan with risk assessment, to ensure that our approach to disaster management is preventative and linked to development planning. It is also recommended that EMM develop strategies to address key seasonal issues such as fires and floods.

k)

The EMM IDP can be commended for its progressive approach for including the 2010 Soccer World Cup and Gautrain projects as capital projects. However, there is a need for greater communication and coordination on these projects by all stakeholders involved. In particular, the municipality needs to undertake a detailed analysis of the actual economic potential and spatial implications from these projects and the manufacturing and construction work that would be relevant to support these efforts.

l)

We are aware of the challenges that the EMM is currently experiencing as a result of the varied nature of Town Planning Schemes, which continue to perpetuate apartheid spatial practices and disintegration. In light of government’s vision of breaking apartheid planning and underdevelopment, it is recommended that the municipality speed up the process of consolidating these various zoning schemes in a manner that will facilitate the development of an integrated land use management system.

m)

It is commendable that the EMM has completed its Integrated Transport Plan. However, the challenges of traffic congestion, insufficient public transport, fragmented spatial patterns, uncoordinated roads, rail, and general transport networks require greater collaboration across all three spheres of government. The Gauteng Department of Public Transport, Roads and Works (DPTRW) has committed itself to revive and strengthen coordination and participation of

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municipalities in structures such as the Transport Coordinating Committee (TCC) and Gauteng Transport Consultative Forum (GTCF). It is anticipated that these forums would provide space to engage with municipalities on matters of transport planning. I trust that you will give these initiatives your full support. n)

Seven of the identified Premier’s priority townships (Katlehong, Kwa -Thema, Daveyton, Tembisa, Wattville , Tsakane and Duduza) are within the municipality. In response to the Premier's call, we all need to make a concerted effort to develop integrated plans for the upgrading of infrastructure and social amenities in these areas. It is therefore pleasing to note in the IDP that the municipality has set aside funds in the current financial year as a contribution to this integrated housing, social and economic infrastructure programme. It is also recommended that the EMM continue to engage my Department and the Department of Housing in this regard.

o)

The EMM IDP can be commended for the good integration of social amenities. For example, social structures in communities deliver home-based care and support, particularly for HIV and AIDS patients. However, the municipality’s IDP lacks strategies that deal with the comprehensive upgrading of social amenities such as schools, clinics and community halls for people in marginalised communities.

p)

The EMM IDP does not indicate how the municipality plans to use Provincial subsidies for the support of Primary Health Care (PHC) services. In this regard, the Gauteng Department of Health has committed itself to focus engagements around the Provincialisation of Health Services, and the implications this would have on operational and capital budgets.

q)

While the EMM IDP does make reference to issues of safety and security, further work is required in this regard. In particular, there is a need for engagement with the South African Police Service (SAPS) on their plans to construct new police stations, which must be integrated with the development plans identified within the IDP. There is also need to focus greater attention on intermunicipal coordination of Traffic Law Enforcement.

r)

The Community Development Workers (CDWs) are a key government initiative in its efforts to build an integrated, effective and caring government, which at all times acts to service the people and to improve their lives. The DLG has already deployed a number of CDWs as full-time public servants within the municipality. It is envisaged that we will have a CDW in each ward by April 2007. In this regard, we will need to work closely to ensure that the full potential of this initiative is realised. In particular, we need to build the working relationships between ward councillors, ward committees and CDWs.”

These matters have been dealt with through the review process and the engagements with the provincial government departments. All EMM departments were part of the process to address the matters raised by the MEC and to deal with as well as work towards achieving improved alignment.

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CHAPTER 2: STATUS QUO 2.1 OVERVIEW The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality was established after the Municipal Elections held on 5 December 2000 and is responsible for the rendering of municipal services to the area formerly known as the East Rand. It is the country’s fourth-largest municipality and one of six metropolitan areas within South Africa. It is bordered by Johannesburg to the east and Tshwane to the north. Ekurhuleni includes the disestablished Councils of Alberton (Thokoza), Benoni (Daveyton, Actonville, Wattville, Etwatwa), Boksburg (Vosloorus, Reiger Park), Kempton Park (Tembisa), Germiston (Katlehong, Palm Ridge), Springs (Kwa-Thema, Bakerton), Nigel (Duduza), Brakpan (Geluksdal, Tsakane), Edenvale/Lethabong, Khayalami Metropolitan Council, and the Eastern Gauteng Services Council. The name Ekurhuleni is a Tsonga word, meaning place of peace. The name was chosen following a public participation process in which hundreds of public submissions from all over the region were received. The use of a Tsonga word, one of South Africa’s eleven official languages, exemplifies the rich diversity of cultures within the area and the Municipality's determination to provide expression to all its residents. The region has approximately 2,5-million residents and comprises some 190 000 hectares of land. It has 8 000 big businesses and 37 000 Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises. The region is responsible for some 23% of the Gross Geographic Product of Gauteng, Sub-Saharan Africa’s most economically powerful region. Ekurhuleni offers countless opportunities in both the manufacturing and service industries. 2.1.1 Infrastructure Ekurhuleni is strategically located, not only within Gauteng, but also within South Africa and the entire subcontinent. All major railway lines in Southern Africa converge at Germiston Station, and Ekurhuleni is served by a freeway network linking the region to virtually all major destinations in South Africa. This network includes the R21 to the City of Tshwane, Limpopo Province and Zimbabwe; the N12 and N17 to Mpumalanga, Mozambique and Swaziland; the N3 to KwaZulu-Natal and Lesotho; as well as the R26 to the Free State and the Western Cape. OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA), Africa’s largest airport, is the entry point for most foreign visitors to Southern Africa. During the 1999/2000 financial year, R475-million was spent on expanding its facilities. Approximately 450 flights daily, or one every three minutes, carry an annual total of 6.2-million departing passengers and 350 000 tons of freight. The airport also attracts significant secondary activities to the area, such as manufacturing and warehousing. In addition to ORTIA, there is a smaller airport in the region – Rand Airport in Germiston – and two airfields, in Brakpan and Springs. 2.1.2 Service Delivery Regions (SDRs) and Customer Care Centres The region is divided into three service delivery regions (North, South and East) with 88 wards in total. There are 88 Ward Councillors and 87 Proportionally Representative Councillors, totalling 175 Councillors.

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In order to ensure quality service delivery EMM is setting up seventeen Customer Care Centres throughout the metro, to address community needs effectively. The Southern SDR consists of Germiston as the regional centre, Thokoza, Katlehong, Vosloorus and Alberton. It also includes parts of Boksburg and Brakpan, among others. The established industrial nodes are Alrode and Wadeville. The Northern SDR includes Kempton Park as the regional centre, Tembisa, Bronburg, parts of Benoni, Edenvale and Germiston, including Bedfordview and Primrose. ORTIA and surrounds are key to the economic structure of the Northern SDR, as is the R21 corridor. The Eastern SDR consists of Springs as the regional centre, Nigel, Kwa-Thema, Tsakane, Duduza, parts of Benoni, Brakpan and Boksburg, as well as the Etwatwa-Daveyton area. The Eastern SDR’s established industrial areas are situated in the eastern periphery of the region while initiatives such as the Germiston-Daveyton Activity Corridor (GDAC) also promise economic potential.

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2.1.3 Community Participation Community participation is extremely important for democratic governance, since this is where our understanding of governance is shaped and defined. In line with this, we are busy instituting the Municipality’s 88 Ward Committees, reflecting our commitment to public participation and good governance. As in the previous term, we will continue to support and strengthen these Committees in order to ensure effective and ongoing community participation. The Municipality is starting to see the fruits of transforming and integrating the eleven disestablished Councils into a unified entity. Previously, these towns had existed in competition with one another, but are now functioning as a single collective that will advance the cause of democracy and social transformation within the region, the province and country. This endeavour towards creating unity was captured wonderfully by our late leader and Ekurhuleni resident, Oliver Tambo, when he said: “It is our responsibility to break down barriers of division and create a country where there will be neither whites nor blacks - just South Africans, united in diversity.” We are firmly committed to fighting poverty and underdevelopment within our city. The Municipality will do its part by rendering quality services to the entire community of Ekurhuleni. These services dramatically influence the lives of the people of Ekurhuleni, and play a vital role in addressing the impoverishment and disempowerment of our people. The main role of local government is to ensure the provision of services to communities in a sustainable manner, to provide democratic and accountable government in these communities and to secure social, economic and political justice. In its provision of services, the Municipality places the highest emphasis and priority on operating in such a way as to benefit the entire community in all its actions. Our emphasis on development is evident from our vision: Ekurhuleni - The Smart, Creative and Developmental City Further, we are committed to the development of our city by focusing on a set of values that guides us in serving the community for which we are responsible. Placing the community first and maintaining a co-operative style of governance is of extreme importance to us. Community involvement is crucial in appropriately servicing the community. This is why our mission statement speaks of “people-centred developmental services”. It is true that when people living in a democracy are mobilised to change their own lives for the better, they become their own liberators. For this reason, we strive to involve the community in everything we do. Our commitment to involving the community in our actions is closely related to another value we strive to adhere to, namely that of being transparent. We are here to serve the community. How can we serve the community if we are not open about the utilisation of our resources, the way in which we operate and the challenges we face?

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2.1.4 Strategic Priorities of the Municipality

Seven key strategic political priorities are at the centre of our vision for transformation in Ekurhuleni. We have committed ourselves to following these strategic political priorities to continue to deliver quality services to our people: • Urban renewal; • HIV/AIDS; • Good governance; • Safety and Security; • Local economic development and job creation; • Community participation; and • Poverty alleviation. Transformation and Amalgamation Process The birth of Ekurhuleni resulted in a number of transformation challenges. Among others, this process required the disestablishment of the former 11 administrations and their amalgamation into a single entity. Today, we can proudly say that we have been able to successfully combine the disestablished councils into a single organisational structure based on the delivery objectives of the Municipality. The introduction of new democratic values and principles, underpinned by the principles of “Batho Pele” (people first), required a radical shift. From a culture of local government characterised by hierarchical line departments, authoritarian management practices and over centralisation, we have had to develop an organisational structure best suited to the delivery imperatives of the region; based on a strong, regionalised service delivery approach and a lean corporate approach. 2.1.5 Effective Financial Management Despite enormous financial constraints, the Municipality has been able to deliver on a number of key capital projects over the past year. In order to ensure that the limited financial resources are optimally utilised, the Municipality’s capital programmes are linked to specific projects. Increased standardisation of IT financial systems is of key importance in the elimination of wastage and inefficiency. The systems that are being put into place, such as a single billing system as well as license, library and payroll systems among others, will result in cost savings which can be utilised for capacity building programmes and multiskilling. The benefits of monitoring expenditure via sound management principles can be applied to other identified priorities such as succession planning, rapid progression of identified potential from the target groups and mentorship programmes.

2.2

Ward Needs Identified by Ward Councillors and Ward Committees

The following needs were identified by the respective Ward Councillors as priorities in the different communities they represent. WARD 01 Ward Councillor

Z Mafanga

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Needs identified 1. Tswelopele ext 8 • Roads/Bridges and Storm water. • Housing. • Electricity. • Alternative land for future residential development (overflow). • Recreational facility/Parks. 2. Tswelopele Ext 6 • Roads/Sidewalks and Storm water. • Pay-point Customer Care Centre (CCC). • School. • Multi-purpose Community Centre (MPCC). 3. Tswelopele Ext 1 • Roads. • Housing. • Tswelopele Clinic (Tembisa). • Wearcare Centre. • Apollo light (Main mast lighting). 4. Hospital View • Roads and storm water. • School. • Pay-point Customer Care Centre (CCC). • Side walk next to Tembisa Hospital. • Sports facility (Mzwingi Ext 12). • Ext 12 (Fence next to railway line). 5. Olifantsfontein • Taxi rank. • Street lighting. • Storm water. • Roads. • R562 – Intersections. • Pedestrian crossing. • Access route. 6. Clayville Ext 26, 21, 29, 39 and 33 • Roads and traffic calming measures – R562 robot. • Pay-point. • School. • Recreational facility MPCC. • Taxi rank. • Side walks. • Apollo light. 7. Tembisa Ext 9 • Street lights.

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• • •

Side walks and paved roads. Fence next to railway line. Storm water.

8. Duduza Channel • Crossing bridge (Pedestrian and cars). ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 02 Ward Councillor

G.Malebo

Needs identified 1. Local economic development • Speedy process of ensuring that Winnie Mandela area is in the Township Register so that proper planning is done. Councillors to be mandated to invited finance houses to give workshops on how to access finance. a. Councillors mandated to organise workshops on how to run businesses. b. Current businesses operating be allowed to operate where they are currently operating c. Council to speed up the process of electrification of Winnie Mandela area. d. The area between Hospital view and Winnie Mandela be made a business precinct. 2. Religious bodies • Councilor mandated to ensure that Church spaces are made available. Council to ensure that there are no changes in terms of tariff structures made to churches. 3. Crèche owners • These organised groupings requested that a properly built crèche be built. The building to comply with legislation requirement; teachers to be taught the basics. 4. Cultural groups • Halls and recreational facilities to be built in the Ward. 5. Human settlement • Electricity reticulation should be done as soon as possible, building of houses to be speeded up and recreational facilities be built. • Parks should be built from Moriting Section along the stream to Zone 5 in Winnie Mandela • Open spaces should also be utilised for recreational facilities. • Schools to be built as there is a shortage • Strict rules to be followed in granting shebeen licenses. • Computer College to be built in the Ward. • Building on NGO facilities is made available. • Proper spaces made for hawkers. • Speedy rezoning of business sites, and other related facilities be made available • Proper sports fields i.e. soccer fields, netball and other sports facilities, be built. A hall to be built. 6. Safety and Security • The high crime rate requires that the CPF be strengthened. The issue of policing is serious.. Revive Street, block and sectional committees. Strengthen “know your neighbour” campaign. Ensure no further occupation of open spaces. ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 03 Ward Councillor

D. Sebiloane

Needs identified 1. Untarred roads • Winnie Mandela, Tlamatlama, Maokeng Extension • Zone 4 Winnie Mandela Park Street from Kruger Park Street stand no. 1177 until stand no. 9799, • Zone 06 Winne Mandela Park Street from stand no. 8978 until stand no. 8794, • Zone 07 Winnie Mandela Park Street from stand no. 8995 until stand no 8777, • Zone 11 from stand no 8107 until 8126, • Zone 11 from stand no 9257 until stand no 9225, • Zone 11 from stand no 9748 until stand no 9747, Apollo Street, Noname Street from stand no. 1149 until stand no 1146, Mucusso Street, tembe Street, Sumbu Street, Kumbia Street, Bornu Street • Zone 04 Winnie Mandela Park • From stand no. 10711 until 10458 • From stand no. 10710 until stand no.10413 • From stand no. 10631 until stand no.10355 • From stand no. 10031 until stand no.10053 • From stand no. 9990 until stand no.10011 • From stand no. 9942 until stand no.9965 • From stand no. 10086 until stand no.10073 • From stand no. 10619 until stand no.9915 • From stand no. 10011 until stand no.9795 • From stand no. 9461 until stand no.9396 • From stand no. 9499 until stand no.9396 • From stand no. 9525 until stand no.9419 • From stand no. 9551 until stand no.9397 • From stand no. 9727 until stand no.9389 • From stand no. 9259 until stand no.9314 • From stand no. 9732 until stand no.9284 • From stand no. 9703 until stand no.9313 • From stand no. 9704 until stand no.9269 • Zone 07/08 Winnie Mandela Park • From stand no. 8975 until stand no.8958 • From stand no. 8935 until stand no.8897 • From stand no. 8874 until stand no.8817 • From stand no. 8737 until stand no.8998 • From stand no. 8638 until stand no.8339 • From stand no. 8359 until stand no.8681 • From stand no. 8340 until stand no.8619 • From stand no. 8632 until stand no.8667 • From stand no. 8360 until stand no.8645 • From stand no. 8648 until stand no.8722 • From stand no 8376 until stand no.8590 • From stand no. 8389 until stand no.8574 • From stand no. 8401 until stand no.8714 • From stand no 8411 until stand no.8538 • From stand no. 8427 until stand no.8498

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• • •

From stand no. 8441 until stand no.8496 From stand no. 8478 until stand no.8419 From stand no. 8704 until stand no.8723

2. Walk-Ways • Peter Ntshabeleng Street from DM Marokane at Zone 11, Winnie Mandela Park until Madiba Drive. • From Peter Ntshabeleng Street in Zone 11, until Solomon Mahlangu Street Zone 11 Winnie Mandela Park. • From Solomon Mahlangu Street at the Corner until Pieter Ntshabeleng Street at the corner of the butchery at Zone 4. • From DM Marokane Street at the pay point until at Nyama King Corner on the side former Clr. Xulu at Zone 11, Winnie Mandela Park. • From Solomon Mahlangu Street next to the bridge at Zone 08, Winnie Mandela Park until Madiba Drive at Zone 06, Winnie Mandela Park. • From Madiba Drive Corner Taxi Rank Zone 06, Winnie Mandela until Solomon Mahlangu Street at the bridge at Zone 08. • Khalahari Gemsbok Street from DM Marokane Street Columbia Street. • Pilanesburg Street form Umfolozi Street until Hausa Kingdom Street. • Skylab Street from DM Marokane Street until Entshonalanga Primary School • Kruger Park Street from Ndumo Street until Skylab Street • Katavi Street from DM Marokane until Magalies Street. • Magalies Street from Skylab Street until Reverend Namane. 3. Storm Water in tarred road • Maintenance on a regular basis • Tarred road at Kruger Park Street and Skylab Street • Long tunnel from Tsenelong pay point to Maokeng Extensio,n until Winnie Mandela Park, must be upgraded. • Zone 6 Winnie Mandela Park tunnel must be upgraded. 4. Electrification • Electrification of Zone 04, Winnie Mandela Park, households 5.

High mast lights • Between Maokeng & Zone 4 • Between Maokeng and Zone 11 • Between Zone 06 and zone 07 • Between Zone 06 and zone 05 • In Zone 08

6. Pedestrian Walkways • • •

Completion of Kruger Park Street Completion of Skylab Street from DM Marokane Street Speed calming measures at Kruger Park; Etosha Street

7. Economic Development • Job creation • Skills development for youth and women. • Poverty eradication • Temporary toilets at Zone 06 and Zone 04.

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• Upgrade of informal soccer ground to formal ground at Zone 04, Zone 09, Zone 11 and Maokeng Ext. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 04 Ward Councillor

L. Mohlapamaswi

Needs identified Conversion of Sethokga Hostel into family units. Township layout of Thembisa ext 7 (realignment) Concrete palisade fencing at Sethokga Hostel. Tarring of Thami Mnyele Street Stalls for informal traders - Nyarhi Corridor High mast lights (5) Traffic calming measures at Mhala Cresent(4), Nyambani Cresent(4), Mpofu Street(2), Nyarhi Street(2), Ntosonke Street(1),Brian Mazibuko Street(5), Isimbongi Street(2), Lobolo Street(3), Thulare Street(2), Imbiza Street(1), and Ndlovu Cresent(3) 8. Satellite police station 9. Ntosonke Street - one new storm water to be installed. 10. Corner Nyarhi and Isimbongi Streets - one new storm water to be installed 11. Mhala Cresent - one new storm water to be imstalled 12. Nyambi Cresent - one new storm water to be installed 13. Imbiza Street - two new storm water to be installed 14. Upgrading of Xubeni sports ground 15. Inkanyaba Street - one calming measure to be installed 16. Paving needed at Mbiza Street, Thulare Street, Lobolo Street and Maluleka Street. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 05 Councillor S.V Hlatshwayo 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Needs identified 1. Roads and storm water • All Ecaleni roads should be tarred. o Mbongolo Street, Mpangele Street, Mathole Street, Ngune Street, Mbuzi Street, Mdlambila Street, Kolobemoru Street • Sedibeng Street names o Thalassa Street, Tethys Street, Rhea Street, Proteus o 178 Ecaleni storm water problem o Speed humps on all already constructed tarred roads. o Complete roads construction in Mashimong and Moriting • Mashimong Section o Star Street o Hyperion Street o Almathea Street o Ganymede Street o Pan Street • Moriting Section o 21 March o National Day o December 26 o 24 September • Ext 7

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o Nare Street – from taxi ranks upwards o Kwena Street – next to railway line o SP Street o Shukudu Street o Tsepe to Bushbuck Street to Shukudu Street o Hippopotamus to Tsepe Street o Storm water valley that need foot badges o Street lights for the houses that are above the storm water valley next to were Nare ends. • 178 Ecaleni, storm water problems that impedes access to the stand. • Mqantsa untarred Street o Phuti street o Thakadu street o Lynx street o Black Rhino Street and park to be improve and tree to be plated playing equipment to be install lights. o Thutlwa street o Alligator street o Nkanyamba Street to be improve and storm water to be improve and side walk paving. o Kudu street storm water systems to be improve. o Kangaroo Street from Nkanyamba to Tembisa station to be retarred and side walk paving and lights to be install. • Roads maintenance • Paving of roads - Ext 7 • Paving of (circles), cul-de-sacs at Sedibeng, Mqantsa o Wildcat, Universe, Nghalapi, Mbuti, Planet, Carina, Astronomy, Monkey, Homo, Bison, Phiri, Orbit, Corona, Bhubesi. o Storm water problems at Nyoni Circle, Ecaleni Section o Pedestrian crossing at bridge. 2. Housing • Waiting lists particularly from 1995 - 1999 application, underground water problem in Kopanong. • Realignment of Ext 07 3. Economic Development • Job Creation • Skills development for youth and women • Co-operatives development - research and training/SMME training and development. • Poverty eradication • Learnerships for youth • Proper development of Mqantsa Industrial Park - orderly operation of businesses, provision of services. 4. Pavement of sidewalks 5. Electrification of houses without electricity • Highmast lights X5 6. Development of sport and recreational facilities • Development of parks in - Sedibeng - up to the standard of Moriting and Sethokga parks: Oakmoor Ext 7: Mqantsa (Kangaroo Street). • Sports grounds - Soccer grounds - Maintenance of soccer grounds. Development of gravel soccer grounds. • Grass planting and grandstands • Library • Development of children recreational facility where there’s equipment for children to play. The place at Isithebe opposite crèche between Thami Mnyele and Brian Mazibuko Drive. ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 06 Ward Councillor

Z Mpongose

Needs identified

MATIKWENI NKUNA VILLAGE TEMBISA EXT 26 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Electrification of RDP houses (about 400 houses) Upgrading of sewer Tarred roads and storm water drainage Water meters are wrongly placed i.e pipes are crossing in the yard Street lights Cleaning of water stream along railway line. Zone stands 11138 Tembisa Ext 26 to food gardening to eradicate poverty. Speed humps at Thami Mnyela Drive West.

ISITHAME SECTION 1. Tarring of the following streets;          

Shilwavusiku Street Mampuru Street Thohoyandou Street Hintsa Street Seaparankwe Street Mafemane Street Sobuza Street Sendzangakhona Street Sekhukhune Street Mushanyana Sankathane Street

2. Speed humps at Ngungunyane Magigwane Street 3. Street lights at Mampuru Street 4. Electrification of indigent houses in all sections ELIDINGA SECTION    

Resurfacing of all roads in the section Upgrading of sewer in the section Upgrading of two parks in the section Street lights at Dalinjebo Street and humps

EMOYENI SECTION    

Tarring of Ngcobo Street, Mokwetje Street and Sihlangu street Upgrading of sewer Storm water drainage Street lights in the section 30

IQGAQGA SECTION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Removal of informal settlement at Madela Kufa I Temporary toilets in the informal settlement. Street lights in the old section. Tarring of Sendzangakhona Street. Storm water drainage in the section. Tarring of all street at Iqgaqga ext (no street names) Street naming at Iqgaqga Ext Erf 241/235 to be developed a retail zone for cooperatives. Safety and security in all sections.

KOPANONG SECTION 1. TARRING OF THE FOLLOWING STREETS: Sun Street  Moon Street  Earth Street  Venus Street  Saturn Street  Nepture Street  Uranus Street  Plutos Street 2. Storm water drainage in the section. 3. Street lights in all Street 4. Upgrading of sewer in the section MASHEMONG SECTION 1. TARRING OF THE FOLLOWING STREETS:        

Equinox Street Nike Street Lunar Street Agena Street Planetarium Street Tarring of all streets at RDP houses in the section. Storm water drainage in the Section Street lights in the whole Section Upgrading of sewer in the Section

SEDIBENG SECTION 1. Upgrading of park in the section 2. Upgrading of sewer in the section 31

3. Street lights in the sections EMKHATHINI AND IBAZELO  Street lights  Upgrading of sewer  Upgrading of Ibazelo Park SPORTS FACILITIES 1. Building of sport facilities at stand no. 783 Isithame Section that land is zoned community facility and is municipality owned land. 2. Building of sports facilities at stand no 430 Emoyeni section (Municipal owned land) 3. Scrapping of informal soccer fields 4. Planting of trees in main road and fruit trees. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  Building of stalls around Tembisa Station  Skill development projects PAVING Paving at the following streets:          

Kopanong section at Thami Mnyele drive Emkhathini Section at Mozereou Street Milky way street Andrew Mapheto Drive George Nyanga Drive Ngungunyane Magigwane Street Dalinjebo Street the site of Isithame Section. Mercury Street Sam Molele Street Ndwandwe Street. Finish paving at Sheba Street about 50 meters.

______________________________________________________________________________ WARD 07 Ward Councillor

T. Sebola

Needs identified 1. Integrated Transport Planning and Services • Wheel chairs are not accommodated in taxis and ramps are needed in taxi ranks-intervention is needed from the government. • Metro rail is not accessible for discussion for disables that are using wheel chairs, aged and blind.

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• • • • •

Some areas within the township are not accessible by the public transport and school transport. Queue marshals (taxis) must get customer service skills because they disrespect the customers such as the aged, disabled and ordinary customers. The government should intervene on the continuous rise of taxi fees even if the petrol is going down. Women should get involved in the transport business (courier business) skills should be given to those who are interested in this kind of business. Community should be encouraged to assist the aged and the disabled when they are using public transport and stop insulting them.

2. Integrated Human Settlement • Councillors should be in charge for their wards in terms of housing allocation, each and every ward should have its waiting list for the process to be fast. • People with disabilities do not get a fair chance when coming to allocation of RDP houses and ramps should be built for disable houses. • In public places the right kinds of ramps are needed but not steep humps. • In terms of RDP houses flats should be built because there is not enough land for houses. • People with disability can not access RDP houses due to corruption that is going on in the housing department; the government must follow the policy of allocating the disabled. • Officials who are selling the RDP houses should be dealt with because they are inconveniencing the process. The housing department should follow on the steps of social department by taking out all the bad elements (officials). • Implementation and evaluation strategy should be used; the community must report all the corrupt they know of. 3. Infrastructure Programme • Roads speed humps are needed within the small streets, Swazi Inn is congested it needs to be expanded, Mooifontein road need expansion due to traffic congestion on weekends, when building roads light earthmoving machine must be used because the big machinery causes in cracks houses, Thindisa Intersection (Maokeng) needs a stop sign or a traffic light (robot), pavements needs expansion and maintenance for the wheel chair to move effectively. • Sports facilities are needed even to cater for different disabilities, Makhulong & Mehlareng need a speedy development for us to host the training teams for 2010, open grounds have been closed due to RDP houses of which is unfair because we were not consulted, arts & culture centre is needed. • Water pipes they need maintenance due to rust that is building. • Sanitation needs continuous maintenance due to blockages • Hospital Tembisa hospital cannot accommodate the rest of the township by that another hospital is needed. • Parks Our parks need a regular maintenance. 4. Economic Development & Investment • Informal traders- they should be encouraged to start co-operatives and organize skills, small businesses should be united so that they can get registered and get skills, investments from tourism to encourage (support) our people to start guesthouse for a purpose of attracting tourist by 2010 an have investors in our townships. • Women in business should be assisted by funding and skills so that they can be empowered. • Business site is needed for the disables to grow their business because renting is a step backward for them. • Partnership- beads making, dressmaking etc. needs assistance to partner with big clothing stores. 5. Health Plan

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• • • • • • • • • • • •

Facilities should be increased. In clinics they should work for 24 hours due to the congestion in hospitals & queues during the day. All clinics should give medication to all patients without referring them to hospitals. Private Doctors should give 3 to 4 hours to assist in public clinics. An old aged home is needed in Tembisa and only adults should be used as the staff. The members of the communities (Tembisa) should be considered in hospital staff they are not from Tembisa. NGO’s (care givers) – the government should assist them with doctors and assist in terms of transport for the transportation of their patients. Ambulance system- the number of ambulance in Tembisa should be increased so that the service can improve and the standard of ambulances should be improved. Road accident fund should assist the department with wheelchairs because most of the accidents occur in roads. Care givers (NGO’s) should get proper trainings from the government so that they can be professional nurses and doctors. Funding should be increased for home based cares because of their hard work which needs financial mussel. Health education needs to be encouraged due to teenage pregnancy. Males should be encouraged to assist in home based cares because their service is needed.

6. Tsenelong Section • A storm water line coming from Ibazelo Section crossing railway line towards Golden gate Street there is a big opened trench that becomes dangerous to peoples life need attention. • Main holes and sewerline in Tsenelong are continuously blocking during rainy time. • Tlama sports centre next to Thuto ke Maatla High School need to be refurbished especially Tennis court and basket ball court. • Thee are passages that are used as an entrance to our sections, they need to be paved and electrified these passages are situated a the following sections: o Makhulong Section o Temong Section o Leboeng Section 7. Streets that need to be tarred per section: • Makhulong section o Juno Street, Lugina street, Menerva Street, Pallas Street, Veritas Street • Tshepo section o Ceres Street, Clio Street, Dion Street and Eros Street • Tlamatlama section o Sagittarius Street, Scorpion Street, Virgo Street, Taurus Street, Leo Street, Zodiac Street, Gemini Street, Aquarius Street • Tlamatlama ext o Nasa street, Voyager Street, Makgalane Street, Soyus Street • Maokeng section o St Lucia Street, Kiteve Street, Zinave Street, Luangwa Street, Golden Gate Street and Miko Street • Tsenelong section o Kutse Street, Luangwa Street • Tsenelong ext o Italia Street, Kalahari Germsbok 34



Temong section o Caprivi street, Bazaruto Street, Maa Street, Yoruba Street and Turunku Street • Temong ext o Golden Gate street, Kitara Street, Kongo Street, Pate Street, Ongamu Street • Leboeng section o Teke street, De Hoop street, Iringa Street, Kanuri Street, Peakock Street, Pheasant Street 8. Streets that need pavement • Mandara Street, Letsiekarana Street, Kakong Street, RTJ Namane Drive, Skeletong Coast Street, Wilderness Street, Columbia Street. 9. Streets that need speed humps • George Nyanga Dive, Mandara Street, Skeleto Coast street, Wabai Street, Lefini Street, Lukusuzi Street, Luba Street, Lunba Street, Thato Street 10. Streets that need storm water drainage • Asteroid Street – Tshepo Section • Ethiopia Street – Makhulong Section • Marko Street – Tsenelong Section • Columbia Street – Tlamatlama Ext. ______________________________________________________________________________ WARD 08 Ward Councillor

J. Mngomezulu

Needs identified

ROADS AND STORM WATER STREET 1. Magubane Street 2. Mvela Street 3. Mbela Street 4. Ramafo Street 5. Langa Street 6. Mkondwane Street 7. Twala Street 8. Mngoma Street 9. Mhlabeni Street 10. Mkhwanazi Street 11. Mathebula Street 12. Masimango Street 13. Khanyile Street 14. Khambula Street 15. Noga Street 16. Mabulekwa Street 17. Mthethwa Street 18. Mnisi Street Monjane Street 19.

SECTION Inxiweni & Isiziba Inxiweni & isiziba Inxiweni Inxiweni Isiziba Inxiweni Isiziba Inxiweni Emmangweni Emmangweni Emmangweni Inxiweni Inxiweni Inxiweni Isiziba Isiziba Emmangweni Emmangweni Emmangweni 35

20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27.

Shabangu Street Ratsikopa Street Dibodu Street Tunisia Street Seku Street Khumalo Street Mfolo Street Mnibi Street

Emmangweni Inxiweni Inxiweni Inxiweni Inxiweni Isiziba Isiziba Isiziba

SPEED HUMPS Street Name

Section

1. 2. 3. 4.

Emmangweni Emmangweni Emmangweni Emmangweni

Baans Street Twala Street Mampuru Street Baduza Street

WALKWAYS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Extension of Brian Mazibuko Street @ Inxiweni and Isiziba Section Extension of Brian Mazibuko from Emmangweni to Emfihlweni Mampuru Street at Emmangweni section Twala Street at Emmangweni section Cnr Mehlulo & Baans street Ngema Street at Inxiweni section Isiziba Street at Isiziba section

ADDITIONAL IDP PRIORITY NEEDS Needs 1. Housing development 2. Upgrading of sewer networks 3. Drainage system for underground water 4. Water pressure & supply 5. Sports centre 6. Library 7. Tourism 8. Electricity

9. Waste management 10. Recreational facilities 11. Extension of clinic hours 12. Skills development project.

Area/Location Madela Kufa 2 Enxiweni, Emmangweni & Endulwini section Endulwini, Isiziba & Enxiweni section Emmangweni section Emmangweni section Enxiweni section Emkhathini section (Thami Mnyele Heritage Park) - Maintenance of street and high mast light through the ward. - Reticulation of indigent houses. Thought the ward Madela Kufa 2

________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 09 Ward Councillor

E.Tekane

Needs identified 1. Moteong Section Priorities • All roads must be tarred with the following priority order: o Kgano Street - completion form Kerstel to RTJ Namane o Gedezi Street- from Kerstel to RTJ Namane, o Landa Street - from Spoonbill to Kerstel Street o Kgaka Street - from Kerstel to Spoonbill Street, o Kgwale Street - from Kerstel to Spoonbill Street o Koti Street - from Kerstel to Spoonbill Street, o Lephoi Street,Turkey o Crescent Street, o Lenong Crescent Street, o Window Street • Traffic lights at RTJ Namane and Sparrow needs attention. • Upgrade storm water construction on all roads. • Walkways needed at Kerstel Street from RTJ Namane to Limindlela Station. • Portion one of 605 sites Moteong opposite Caprivi to be retainable, and developed for soccer field. 2. Teanong Section Priorities • Gravel roads development priority sequence: o Kakongo Street- from George Nyanga to Mmapheke o Mot Street - from RTJ Namane to Letsiakarana o Kanen Street - from RTJ Namane to Letsiakarana o Iringa Street- from George Nyanga to Mmapheke Street o Pheasant Street- from George Nyanga to Pekwa Street o Kanem Street- from RTJ Namane to Letsiakarana o Dongola Street- from RTJ Namane to Letsikarana o Peacock Street- from George Nyanga to Pekwa Street o GumanyeStreet- from George Nyanga to Mmapheke Street o Brava Street- Tarring and storm water Ext 05 o Kokomere Crescent- from Letsiakarana to Letsiakarana o Burno Street- from Brava to Kokomere Crescent o Mmapheke Street- complete from Letsiakarana to Lefaloa Crescent o Lefaloa Crescent-from Mmapheke to Mmapheke • Storm water construction and gravel roads. • Walkways - Mmapheke Street from Letsiakarana to RTJ Namane • Street lights at Swazi Inn Corridor, George Nyanga Drive • Small business development centre from Andrew Mapheto to Letsiakarana Swazi Inn. 3. Leboeng Extension 05 • Road and storm water construction at Khoi Street, Merca Matamba Str,Teka Street, Kasenje Street, Mandika Street, Yao Street, Chobe Street, Edu Street. 4. Lekaneng Section • Storm water construction on all the roads - Impangela Street - from Nonyane to Fish Eagle Street, Hummingbird Street - from Nonyane to Fish Eagle Street, Lovebird Street - Road and storm water construction, Falcon Street - from wall to wall, Maopie Street, Kopanisi Street, Crow Street, Cuckoo Street, Doves Street, Dlanga Street, Gwababa Street. • Walkways - Hummingbird Street

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• •

Speed calming humps – Vulture Street – Towards Vulture Street Streetlights and electrification at Lekaneng Ext.

5. Mpho Section • Impangela Street. - New roads development • Hummingbird Street • Falcon Street - over Andrew Maphetho Drive- wall road and storm water construction 6. Welamlambo Section • The following gravel roads development in priority sequence: o Djibouti Street - from Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula to Algeria o Ghana Street - from Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula to Algeria o Zimbabwe Str. - from Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula to Algeria o Sierra Leon Str. - from Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula to Algeria o Malawi Street- from Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula to Algeria o Congo Street - from Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula to Algeria o Gabon Street - from Swaziland to Algeria, Mali Street-from Zimbabwe to Ghana Street 7. Walkways Priorities • RTJ Namane Drive – Moteong Section Left side from Spoonbill to Kerstrel Str, Mmamasianoke Street – Motsu Section from Caprive, RTJ Namane Drive to Nokeng Bridge Right hand side, Kerstrel Street – Motheong Section form Lerato Shopping complex to RTJ Namane Drive, Seagull Street – Mpho and Lekaneng Section from Andrew Maphethu Drive to Lekaneng Ext Bridge, Robin Street – Mpho/Lekaneng – both left and right sides from Seagull Street to Bojelong Primary School, Fish Eagle Street – Lekaneng Section from Seagull Street to Andrew Maphethu Drive Hal, Zephenia Msebenzi Mathebula Street – Welamlambo Section Right hand side from Benin Street to Brian Mazibuko Drive, NOTE – Tarring of Algerial Street Welamlambo Section left a portion adjacent house No. 1 Cnr Algerial and Zephania Msebenzi Mathebula Street BE PAVED, Mapheeke Street – Teanong Section from RTJ Namane Drive to Letsiakarana Street, Swaziland Street – Welamlambo Section from Benin to Algeria Streets, Pekwa Street – Motsu Section from Mmamasianoke to Letsiakarana. 8. Walkways Development Priorities on Untarred Roads • Humming Bird Street-Mpho Section from Nonyana to Robin Street. Walkway pedestrian corridor from Kgano and Nkoro to pedestrian Bridge over Andrew Maphethu Drive, Nkankani Street - Motsu Section from Mmamasianoke to Letsiadarana Streets, Kanem Street – Teanong Section from RTJ Namane to Letsiakarana Street, Amot Street – Teanong Section from RTJ Namane to Letsiakana Street, Lerubisi – Motsu Section from Mamasianoke Street to Ext 05 Ivory Park border line. 9. Storm Water Development / Problems Priorities • RTJ Namane Drive – New storm water infrastructure construction from Mehlareng Stadium to Kestrel Street, Reconstruction of Storm Water Infrastructure at Mmamasianoke Street, Storm Water problem – Sparrow Street Moteong Section – BLOCKED, Weaver Street Lifateng Section untarred, New Storm Water Infrastructure Development, Kgano Street – untarred, new Storm Water Infrastructure Development, Ilanda Street Moteong Section - New Storm Water Infrastructure Development, • Amot Street Teanong – Untarred - New Storm Water Infrastructure Development, Kanem Street Teanong Section - New Storm Water Infrastructure Development, Kokomere Crescent – Teanong Ext 05 - New Storm Water Infrastructure Development, Fish Eagle Street – Lekaneng Section - New Storm Water Development. 10. Lifateng Section • Gravel roads developments in following priority:

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• • • • • •

• Weaver Street- from Derstel to Sophia town Erf 473, • Shoebill Street, • Raven Street, • Ndzeyani Street, • Mogale Street , • Honey bird Street - from Skywalk to Kgwale Street, • Secretary Bird Str – complete from Sparrow, • Flamingo Street, • Alican Street, • Ostrich Street, • All gravel roads development at erf 473 Sophia Town • Lifateng Section Storm water constructions on all roads Sport ground site 575 lifateng Section must be aligned to Seotloana Primary and fenced for school soccer field and community. High mast light erf 473 Sphiatown Lifateng Street lights not working at Erf 11 Lifateng Manzini Speed calming humps - Skywalk Street Stop sign at Skywalk and Sparrow Streets Park development below Honey Bird Street towards stream to Buhleni Park

11. Seotloana Section • Road development priorities as noted • Mpangela Street- from RTJ Namane to Legodi • Skhova Street- from RTJ Namane to Mmamsianoke • Tale Street- from RTJ Namane to Mmamsianoke • Legakabe Street- from RTJ Namane to Mmamsianoke • Storm water construction on all roads • High mast light site 753 Seotloana Section next to Buhleni Park 12. Motsu Sesction • Swan Street, Lerubisi Street,Thekwani Street Crescent ext 5,Nkankani Street, Duck Street, Goose Street, Peacock Street, Pheasant Street, Murubisi Street ext 05,Sehudi Street, Phakwe Street,Theko Street • Sport Centre development at site 488 and 487 Motsu ground • Housing development at site 1773 Motsu • Extension 5 between Motsu ext 5 and Teanong ext 5 housing development at site 2256 Motsu extension 5 between Motsu ext 5 and Ivory Park 13. Walkways • Mmamasianoke Street from RTJ Namane to the bridge • High mast lights Motsu ext 5 Thekwani Street • High mast lights in Motsu section inside household property not working, need rezoning. • High mast lights not working regularly • Streetlights electrification • Thekwani Street Motsu Ext 5 • Sehudi Street Motsu ext • Phakwe Street Motsu ext 5 • Theko Street Motsu ext 5 • Murubisi Street from Mmamasionoke to Ivory Park cross border. • Rezoning – high mast light at 320/321 Duck and Motsu Street.

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Park development - Motsu overgrown grass, river stream area below and alongside Murubisi Street.

14. Housing • Subsidy housing development - Motsu ext. open field, Site 1775 and 1774 between Motsu ext 15. Sport Facilities • • 16. Parks • •

Sports centre - Site 487 and 488 Motsu Indoor sport facility - Indoor Swimming pool

Buhleni Park Maintenance Kalkspruit from Lifateng site 519, Moteong, Motsu park development between Swaziland, Mali, Ghana and Zimbabwe Streets Welamlambo - Park Development

17. Economic Development • Swazi Inn - small business development; stalls provision and allocation • Public toilets development • Regulation and registration of Street traders • Waste removal system • George Nyanga - small business development; stalls provision and allocation • Street trader regulatory measures • Limindlela small business development; provision of stalls 18. Education • Primary Schools Development/provision • Motsu Ext, Erf 1773, Erf 2256 ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 10 Ward Councillor

M. Sehwana

Needs identified 1. Housing • Formalisation of informal settlements. • Sanitation and water in informal settlements. • Consideration of back yard houses. • NCP Hostel to be taken by Council, and build Primary school. 2. Roads • • • •

Inhambane Street Colourbar Street Benguela Street Walkways - Gweru Street,Tniteng Passage, Nakuru Street, Lusaka Street

3. Bridges • Overhead bridge from Vusimuzi to Ethafeni (very urgent). • Overhead bridge from Tembisa Plaza • Overhead bridge from Thiteng

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4. Electricity • Removal of old (non-functioning) electricity boxes at Kgatlamping Section and Thiteng. • Informal settlement to be provided with electricity (temporary or permanent) 5. Maintenance • Greening and fencing of 3 parks -,Esangweni Park, Moedi and Kgatlamping ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 11 Ward Councillor

B. Zitha

Needs identified Reconstruction of Lawrence and Phokanoka Drive. Maintenance of roads (potholes) Overhead bridge between Umfuyaneni and Tembisa Plaza. Improvement of storm water drainage. Review of solid waste removal. Development of Kwazini secondary school. Development of roads - Umfuyaneni,ext and Eisi Gongweni. Development of informal settlement Development of swimming pool around Intwe area of Tswelopele sports field Building of a community centre Construction of road - Kayelitsha-Mtambena Construction and cleaning of storm water Paving passages and small roads at Mfuyaneni RDPs and Khaye Litsing Lavorence Phokanako Street, that links Kanana and ext JHB-Metro, to be constructed (roads) Upgrading of Shower System around Mnanjaneni and Entshonalanga Out facing of two roomed houses around Umtambena and Mfuyaneni Overhead bridge needed at Andrew and Mapheto -Tembisa Plaza Nadia Street needs reconstruction Development of informal settlement at Zumneube Viuage in Umtuambeka and Kito K3 ext11 Meube informal settlement 20. Construction of Street at Esigongweni and Umfuyaneni Ect 5 Nemalaya Street 21. Renovation of Kwazini High school 22. Construction of a cross bridge N.C next to B.P Garage 23. Improvement of sewerage system at Umthembeka to Mfuyane next to Kaal Spruit 24. Improvement of electricity supply and network 25. Construction of side walks 26. Improvement of recreational facilities at Umfuyaneni and Ndayeni 27. Thembisa West • High mast lighting, Street lighting • Road maintenance, traffic calming measures, pedestrian facilities • Sewerage upgrade • Tourism, natural environment, park maintenance, • Upgrade and maintain clinics, facilities for the disabled, the aged and youth • Safety and security, visible policing, building of police station around Tembisa • Housing development, multi-purpose centre • Sports facilities, solid waste removal NB: this matter is of urgent importance ______________________________________________________________________________________ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

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WARD 12 Ward Councillor

D. Sepirwa

Needs identified 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Building of a Clinic to relieve the congestion that currently exists with the small clinic. Complete Water Meter Installation Project for the remainder of the Phomolong properties Electricity for 400 New Houses built on erfs 2579, 3461, 3748, and 3781 in Phomolong. Upgrade Storm Water and Sewer services in Phomolong Install Robots at all entrances to Phomolng as well as speed humps and speed cameras along Andrew Mapheto Road. 6. Create, grade and build Sports Grounds for all sporting codes, including informal football grounds. 7. Paving of Freedom Street 8. Streetlights along Modderfontein Road towards Mayibuye shopping centre (Mama She). 9. Reseal the potholes in Dunlop Street in Chloorkop. 10. Design and build proper hawkers’ facilities in and around Mayibuye Shopping centre. 11. Create, grade and build proper sports grounds, particularly for football and gymnastics for Commercia 9 (Friendship Town) ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 13 Ward Councillor

A. Hunter

Needs identified 1. A traffic signal system to be installed at Andrew Mapheto and Inauguration Streets at Phomolong. There was an accident at this intersection on 2 November 2006. Two school girls where killed and 21 others injured. 2. Concrete palisade fencing to be erected on Spoorweg Road in Kempton Park West and Chloorkop Road in Kempton Park West. These roads are within the boundaries of Ekurhuleni and not part of the Provincial Road M39. With the M39 (Zuurfontein Road) being a main road and handling excessive vehicle load, the crossing by foot between the two sides of Kempton Park West has resulted in numerous fatalities in this area. There is a pedestrian bridge across this road that is not used because it is easier to cross the M39 on foot. With the palisade fence erected, it will then force the pedestrians to use the bridge and lives will be saved. 3. Bergriver Drive must be reconstructured from the intersection with Kwartel up to the M39 (Zuurfontein Road). This road is now a major feeder road from the residential areas to the M39 and does carry excessive traffic. A further problem is the storm water management along this road. With new housing developments taking place, not enough attention was given to the control of the storm water. The floods during the latter part of 2005 showed that the storm water management was deficient. Storm water is collected on Orange River Drive, this then flow through Kildere Lofts housing development into Bergriver and then over the road into Marmanet retirement village. The floods caused major damage to Marmanet retirement village. The request is to do this development in two stages. Stage 1 would be to implement the storm water management plan and stage two would be to rebuild the road. 4. High mast lighting (Apollo Lights) in Phomolong. Streetlights. None exists and this results in high crime. 5. The Streets in Phomolong (Ward 13) that are not tarred must be upgraded and tarred. This will also assist with the storm water management. The naming of these Streets is not consistent with the Street maps and the actual situation. 6. Electricity supply in Phomolong and Birch Acres Extension 23 to 32 is not sufficient. The electricity outages place a burden on the residents, as they cannot rely on constant electricity throughout the year. The supply is especially problematic during the winter months. Backup supply to be routed to these areas and upgrade of the supply is required. 7. A community hall is required in Birch Acres Extension 23 to 32. A sports field linked to this community hall is also required. Library facilities also to be included. 8. Taxi rank is also required in Birch Acres Extension 23 to 32.

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9. In all suburbs of Ward 13, erect signs restricting vehicles over 3.5 tons from entering the areas. 10. A traffic study to be conducted in Ward 13 to establish the viability of using traffic circles to increase the traffic flow through the residential areas to the main roads. Budget for these traffic circles to be implemented in five roads. Traffic calming must be investigated and budget for at least 10 (ten) sets of speed humps. The locality of these speed humps will be discussed with the affected communities. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 14 Ward Councillor M.I.T. Mahlangu Needs identified 1. Roads •

All Untarred roads within the Ward have to be tarred

2. Priority roads • Abidjan Street, Angola Street, Nigeria Street, Mozambique Street, Conakry Street, Sepeng Street, Eritria Street, Chad Street, Africa Borwa Street, • Pointe Noire, Molefe Street, Mtyoki Street Cameron Street, Sychelles Street • Renovation of the facility/clinic/pay point 3. Pedestrian facilities • Pedestrian facilities have to be erected in all tarred Streets within the Ward. 4. Electricity • Remove Street lights and replace with high mast lights. • Electrification of all indigent households within the Ward. • Renovation of erf 150 Inxiweni and utilisation of the building as a community centre. 5. Other • Installation of a storm water system along Brian Mazibuko Drive. • Construction of a pedestrian bridge and a link road between Thafeni and Vusimuzi sections through St Hellen Street. • Opening of the road between Lydia Street (Birchleigh North) and Essellen Park. • Erection of a fence along the railway line between Isivina and Welamlambo section to decrease the rate of suicides. • Essellen Park link road to Emmangweni section. • Essellen Park, electrification of the area phase two. • Extension of Thafeni clinic. • Cutting of grass at Birchleigh, Essellen Park, Thafeni, Mfihlweni Siphethweni etc. open spaces continuously. • Upgrading of sporting facilities (e.g. grounds Thafeni, Isivana, Essellen Park) • All roads to be graded and tarred; worst ones must be graded, as a temporary measure. • Storm water system at Algeria Street • Cleaning of Emfihlweni cemetery. • Installation of Street lights/ Sam Molele west, along Essellen Park. • Building of humps on all the roads that have been constructed. • Paving of a passage at Isivina/Algeria. • Kerbing of unpaved roads e.g. Ililiba, Isiphethweni. • Maintenance of roads. • Renaming of Streets and numbering of houses. ___________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 15 Ward Councillor

J. Roos

Needs identified 1. Roads Resurfacing • Lesley Street - Birchleigh • Quinine Street - (nearest corner Veld Street- Glen Marais) • Lechwe Street - Nimrod Park • Koedoe Street - Birchleigh • Anemoon Road - Glen Marais • Pretoria Road to be doubled urgently. 2. Traffic calming • Cactus and Partidge Avenue • Due to the increase of “Enclosed Areas” feeding this intersection, and the location of the retirement villages and old age homes. 3. Pedestrian facilities • Besem Bos Street – Birchleigh (near station) 4. Construction of speed humps • At all schools and crèches, Maroela Street (nearest corner Silverleaf Street- Hoerskool Birchleigh) 5. Public transport • Taxi lay-byes and shelters • Monument and Dan Road - Glen Marais • Monument and Anemoon - Glen Marais 6. Storm water management • Corner Koppie and Tugela Streets - Glen Marais. • Veld and Koring Street - Glen Marais 7. Electricity • High mast to be installed at intersection of R25 (from Kempton Park to Babsfontein) and 9th road (coming from Marister/Bredell to Elandsfontein.) 8. Safety and security • Satellite that was donated to Council - should be utilising it. 9. Illegal dumping -Throughout the Ward. ______________________________________________________________________________ WARD 16 Ward Councillor

R. Hunter

Needs identified 1. Pedestrian facilities • Besem Bos Street, near Van Riebeeck Station.

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2. Storm water Management • Kempton Park West and Van Riebeeck Park. 3. Safety and Security • Pallisade fence on R25 from Casa Caritas in Van Riebeeck Park to Edleen Extension 3. 4. Roads (new and resurfacing) • Slipways at intersection c/o C.R Swart Drive and Rienert Avenue. • Pretoria Road needs to be doubled urgently. • Elgin road needs to be doubled – as well as the part under the railway that links with Pretoria Road. This intersection is experiencing major traffic congestion as this is the main route to Tembisa. • Slipway at Georgina Street and Soutpansberg Road. • Most of the roads need resurfacing, as they are older than 20 years. • Slipways Rienert Avenue (North) into R25 and CR Swart Drive – synchronising of traffic light to improve the flow of traffic during peak hours. • Upgrading of all intersections of streets joining up with Pretoria Road between Sir Pierre Van Rynefeld High School and the Ekurhuleni West College (Partidge). 5. Traffic Calming • Speed humps to be erected around all schools in Ward 16 • Speed hump to be erected along Soutpansberg Avenue, beyond Klapper Street in a northern direction. • Speed humps or traffic lights at schools are needed.

• Traffic light should be erected and speed humps installed at the entrance of Avion Park in Highveld Road, it is not only a family health and fitness centre anymore for the last three years a private school are being operated from this premises ± 500 scholars. Motorist are speeding and not adhering to speed limit. • Intersection Highveld Road and Du Plessis Avenue near Kreft Laerskool has become a problem as well, motorists don’t adhere to the four way stop and it is dangerous for scholars to cross the road. My proposal will be either a four way robot or a traffic circle.

8. Electricity • A high mast light at the traffic circle - intersection Rienert Avenue and Okkerneut road - this is a dangerous circle, drivers cannot see it at night and many accidents occur here. 9. Public transport • Taxi lay-byes and shelters at Technical College in Pretoria Road. 10. Parks • Several parks need palisades • Signs should be put up to discourage residents from using parks as their private race tracks, braai areas and toilets. 11. Environment • The rest of Swartspruit should be upgraded and rehabilitated. __________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 17 Ward Councillor

A. Sauls

Needs identified 1. General Needs Identified

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• • • • • • • • • •

Roads need major repair and/or resurfacing with suitable sidewalks for pedestrians General maintenance of road signs and markings General maintenance of visible, well-positioned Street signs Maintenance of stolen manhole covers and cleaning of storm water drains Regular, on-time general grass cutting and clean up, especially around schools and other public places Rodents are invading residential properties owing to poor cleaning standards Effective safety and security measures to reduce criminal activities as well as poor road user behaviour Maintenance of traffic lights and painting General maintenance to Street lighting, especially where trees could negatively impact on the effectiveness of Street lights General greening of the residential areas

2. Cresslawn • Traffic calming Rigger, Sycamore and Steel Roads around Cresslawn Primary School with welldemarcated learner road crossing points with highly visible Street signs warning motorists of learners • Park needs attention - removal of Blue train, this is used as a dumping facility, with general greening of the park 3. Croydon • Traffic circle - Serena and Major Millar Roads, to ensure free-flowing traffic • Effective, visible 24/7 safety and security measures • Truck restriction measures to reduce the over 5 ton trucks driving through Croydon; this could be achieved by having a height restriction over access roads 4. Elandsfontein • Traffic calming in Hattingh Street in front of Secondary School • Traffic calming in Blesbok and Zebra Roads • Highly visible, well-demarcated pedestrian crossing - Barbara and Zebra Roads • Highly visible, well-demarcated pedestrian crossing - Barbara and Olifant Roads • Park needs attention to ensure proper playing facilities for children with some greening • Taxi Rank and related retail facilities development • Clinic to be outsourced to the community • Sports facilities for local sports bodies • Water leakages need urgent serious attention • Effective 24/7 safety and security measures 5. Ester Park • Electricity meters upgrade 6. Klopper Park • Traffic calming Murmel Street in front of Klopper Park Primary with highly visible learner crossing points and road signs warning motorist of learners • Safe crossing facilities over Barbara/Isando Roads for primary school learners that walk from Elandsfontien to Klopper Park Primary school, highly visible road signs warning motorists of learners • Clinic needs upgrading to 5 day medical and preventative services to community, with related HIV/AIDS facilities • Regeneration of Swimming Pool with community involvement and project • Regeneration of Hall and related facilities with community involvement and project • Regeneration of Library with community involvement and project

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Regular, on-time general grass cutting and clean-up of the environment

7. Sunnyridge • Regular, on-time grass cutting and general cleanliness • Develop visitors’ parking at the Solheim senior citizens’ institution by changing the grass areas on Orient Street with speed calming measures • Introduce a 3-way Stop intersection on the corner of Orient and Neptune Streets. 8. SunnyRock • Urgent upgrade and/or maintenance of power grid/infrastructure 9. Woodbrooke • Urgent upgrade and/or maintenance of power grid/infrastructure 10. Rhodesfield • Traffic calming on Gladiator road between Fury and Catalina roads in front of day care facilities with clearly marked road signs warning motorists of drop-off and collection of crèche attendees • Traffic calming on Gladiator Road at Fury Road for Laerskool Kempton Park learners with clearly marked road signs warning motorists of learners crossings 11. Kempton Park CBD Maintenance and Upgrade • Revitalised CBD business district to ensure vibrant business sector servicing the various business needs • Informal trade need organised business facilities with the related resting/relieving facilities • Taxi rank and upgrades of infrastructure surrounding Kempton Park station • Effective, visible 24/7 safety and security services to ensure a crime-free CBD • After-hours parking facilities for developing night life • CBD is the gateway to the international markets and communities. Many tourists, businessmen and airline staff may need short term resting/refreshing facilities. The CBD may offer such facilities and accommodation • Highly diverse businesses and communities exist in the CBD; tourism must be encouraged to the CBD by way of cultural attraction, notwithstanding the fact the Kempton Park is the birth place of the strong advance of the South African constitution; democracy was born in Kempton Park. • Poor water drainage onramp to Pomona Road from under the bridge opposite the airport freight buildings, and general storm water management • Roads infrastructure in serious need of resurfacing and general maintenance, including pedestrian sidewalks • Maintenance of road markings and signs • Upgrade of highly visible, well-positioned Street names • Regular, on-time cleanliness of the CBD environment, possible after hours cleansing to ensure a clean city • General greening of CBD • Highly visible, well-demarcated pedestrian crossings from Kempton Park CBD to Station and Taxi rand 12. Isando and related Industrial districts • Isando and Barbara Roads, currently extremely important motorways in transporting goods in and out of Isando and related industrial areas, are in dire need of major reconstruction and/or rehabilitation; roads must withstand the higher tonnage of new trucking designs • The roads infrastructure of Isando and related industrial areas are in serious need of reconstruction and rehabilitation. • Electrical grid is overloaded and under-maintained, major upgrade to electrical grid is needed.

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• • • • • • • •

Street lights, especially in Barbara Road area, are in need of major upgrade Poor water drainage in Barbara Road Regular, on-time general grass cutting and cleanliness of the environment industrial areas of Isando Informal traders need organised trading environments with related resting/relieving facilities Taxi drop-off and collection points in various Streets almost similar to the old bus shelter with some protection against the weather Improved pedestrian sidewalks General greening of open spaces with resting and or some sporting facilities for workers during breaks Effective 24/7 safety and security

13. Spartan and related Industrial districts • Electrical grid/substation replacement owning to Gautrain Rapid Rail Link development in Fitter Road, Spartan • Poor water drainage at corner of Derick and Kelvin Roads • Crumbling road infrastructure which could be negatively affected by the Gautrain Rapid Rail Link Development needs serious urgent reconstruction and or rehabilitation, roads must withstand the higher tonnage of new trucking designs • Spartan Clinic in need of general maintenance, staff shortages need addressing and medical supplies shortages need serious attention • Regular, on-time general grass cutting and cleaning of the industrial environments of Spartan industrial districts • Informal traders need an organised trading environment with related resting/relieving facilities • Taxi drop-off and collection points in various Streets almost similar to the old bus shelters with some protection against the weather • Improved pedestrian sidewalks • General greening of open spaces with resting and or some sporting facilities for workers during breaks • Effective 24/7 safety and security 14. O R Tambo international Airport • Drop-off and collection of air travellers needs serious attention, high levels of congestion exist at various intervals 15. Gautrain Rapid Rail Link Project • Development of the project impacts on the SPCA, new suitable facilities is needed for the SPCA • Business will be negatively impact by development, especially with road closures and utilities redirecting, effective management is needed to ensure minimal production loss to business. • Road infrastructure will be affected by construction vehicles, management of the road infrastructure will need effective management. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 18 Ward Councillor

J. Anticevich

Needs identified 1. Electricity • Elma park - revamp of feeder cable. • Sebenza - theft of material in sub stations a problem. • Infrastructure upgrading needed, e.g. more demand on electricity through townhouse complexes etc. • Low voltage distribution kiosks needed.

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2. Street and high mast lighting • Upgrading needed in• Illiondale • Isandovale • Edenglen 3. Roads (new/resurfacing) • Urgent attention needs to be given too Palliser road o Cunningham road. 4. Traffic calming measures • Urgent attention needs to be given to widening the following roads• Lawrie road • Palliser road • Baker road • Widen off ramp from Mannie road onto Baker Road, Isandovale. • Revamp Hurley road/ St Johns Road intersection, Hurleyvale. 5. Pedestrian facilities • Robot at Van Riebeck Road and Horwood Road intersection especially for pedestrian crossover, needs urgent attention. 6. Storm water management • Lawrie Road Illiondale is a problem. • Bridge in Venda Road Sebenza needs attention 7. Public transport • Upgrading and resurfacing of the three taxi ranks- CBD, Eastleigh, Illiondale • Bus service from CBD to Greenstone Centre. 8. Economic development projects • Assessment project to revitalise CBD needed. 9. Natural environment • Van Riebeck Road CBD - plant trees/shrubs down middle of road • Plant trees along Minuach Road to block out freeway and the pollution. 10. Pollution 

Set up plan to avoid littering in Van Riebeck Road in CBD.

11. Facilities for the aged and the disabled • Ramps needed in public facilities. 12. Emergency services • Emergency numbers to be updated and displayed on Street pole boards. 13. Safety and security • Speed trapping needed in – Terrace road, Boeing Road, Hurleyvale rod. 14. Parks

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• •

Horwood Farm – re-grade roads, clean dam, ongoing maintenance and security needed. Illiondale bird sanctuary - needs cleaning.

15. Housing development • Rethink rezoning for business rights and townhouse complexes. 16. Multi-purpose centers • Maintenance needed at J.A Du Plessis hall. 17. Cemeteries • Upgrade security such as fencing and guards. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 19 Ward Councillor

B. Naylor

Needs identified 1. Road resurfacing - 4th grade roads in Edenvale are between 30 to 40 years old, and have never been resurfaced over their lifespan. Every surburb has roads that are crumbling, so cannot be specific. 2. Water - continuous pipes or valves burst. At the moment ,Terrace Road is having a spate of bursts. 3. Electricity, as per previous lists - some refurbishment is taking place at the moment, but will not solve all our problems. 4. Crime - a steep increase in crime – particularly house-breaking in Marias Steyn Park. Need for visible policing. 5. Traffic flow. Every year this is on our list. Ad-hoc changes are being made but a complete traffic study is urgently needed. 6. Town planning. Define CBD and stop random office development along so-called activity spines. 7. Local IDP as a result of public meetings in 2003 to be adhered to. ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 20 Ward Councillor

M. Clarke

Needs identified 1. Traffic calming measures • Pedestrian facilities (paving and sidewalks) Van Buuren – between Park and Nicol. The sidewalks on either side Van Buuren Rd had beautiful gardens. To be cleaned and maintained. Cleaning up of Smith Street alongside them. Islands along centre of Smith gardens in a terrible state. Storm water management – Drains need cleaning and construction - Van der Linde and Boeing Road West Bedfordview. Unblocking and cleaning of storm water drains in the entire Ward. They never get cleaned, resulting in flooding during the rainy season. Roads – new and resurfacing – Completion of Rong Rd.. Upgrading of North Reef Road between Germiston and Riley Roads Townsend and Van Buuren Rd. • Natural Environment – River bank erosion Morninghill. Cleaning of the Jukskei River Morninghill. Parks – Gilloolys. Cemeteries – Primrose. 2. Roads • Van Buuren Road needs upgrading in front of the News Café and the upgrading of the ring road is not urgently needed. • Arterial Rd needs upgrading and re-surfacing • Daws Road needs upgrading and re-surfacing. • Banksia Road needs upgrading and re-surfacing • Ixia Road Wychwood needs speed humps. Quite residential area, speedsters cause havoc in area. • Cydonia Rd needs permanent speeding camera and upgrading of intersection. • Geldenhuys Rd Wychwood needs the intersection to be redesigned between Graham and Geldenhuys Roads. • Kloof Rd and AG De Wit Drive Bedfordview - need robot on intersection - very dangerous. • The widening and tarring of Kelly Lane. • Ferguson Rd - I have requested the project be put on the TurnKey project. This Road needs redesign. widening and resurfacing. Hope Huges Road needs re-surfacing. The roads on the whole need major maintenance to them. The ring road on Riley and Concorde needs upgrading and relooking at.. The re-surfacing of Scots Way and Hill Terrace. 3. Road markings • All road markings in the area of Bedfordview, Malvern East, Wychwood, Dania Park, Primrose Hill and Simmerfield need to be re-painted - in a very bad state. 4. Traffic signs • All traffic signs in this Ward need to be looked at, there are many signs that are half broken and have not been maintained. 5. Paving, sidewalks and gardens •

All sidewalks need to be maintained and cleaned up. Simmer Field Malvern East and Wychwood pavements are in a terrible state - need upgrading. Civic Centre Bedfordview - all gardens around the Civic Centre need to be cleaned up and maintained - they are in a terrible state. Parks – All parks need to be cleaned up and maintained in the entire ward. Park on Van der Linde Road and Geldenhuys Road in terrible state, a haven for squatters and criminal activities. Geldenhuys Road and Mullins – Spare Connection have upgraded that area very nicely with their new building - they have planted palms on the side walks and now need Council to pave these side walks. The Civic area in Bedfordview needs serious upgrading - the gardens are in a terrible state. I see that R100 000-00 has been allocated to the upgrading of the Civic Centre - please ensure that this is on the

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budget. Islands in the roads are not being maintained after the Metro spent money on them upgrading them. Maintenance all-round needs to followed up. A community hall should be erected on the property next to library so that community activities can take place there, eg. Judo, dancing, kick boxing, scouts ect. 6. Infrastructure •

This is probably the biggest problem in my Ward. I have daily queries on leaking water pipes, leaking sewerage and electricity supplies that have been stopped. I simply feel the funds that have been budgeted for in this area are not enough to upgrade the infrastructure. Residents in my Wards always ask why, when they pay a huge amount of rates, there are always problems with infrastructure. We need to assess the problem - this is a matter of urgency.

7. Hawkers •

We need to demarcate three areas where hawkers can trade.

8. Cemeteries - Primrose • This cemetery needs the following upgrading; Renovating of two waiting rooms in the building. Upgrading of roads inside the cemetery - potholes cracking. Drainage needs to be looked at. Renovating of office toilets and gates. Painting of the entrance walls. Painting inside and outside. Tiling office and toilets. Renovating the storeroom. Fix roof that is leaking. 9. Gilloolys •

Gilloolys gardens need upgrading - not looking good. All walkways brick paving lifting and needs to be seen to. The toilets need revamping - many broken toilets. Guard house needs to be rebuilt - looks like a broken shack. Perimeter fencing needs fixing.

10. Bedfordview testing station • Testing station needs upgrading, no perimeter fence security - very bad as there are continuous robberies there. Offices need to be renovated and gardens need to be upgraded so that these offices look attractive. They are a mess at the moment. 11. Service delivery centres • A full functional service delivery centre needs to be constructed in the Bedfordview area. 12. Staff and vehicles • The staff and vehicle shortage in the Metro hampers productivity. Every aspect needs to be looked at to get the job done. 13. Bradford Estate - collapsing bank of steam I have been advised of the following: • Detail planning. A multi-disciplinary specialist team of consultants will be appointed during the 2005/2006 financial year to prepare a technical social economical ecological and institutional sustainable plant for this watercourse. The necessary negotiations and contractual agreements will also be done during this phase concerning the obligations of various stakeholders. • Detail design and possible implementation of the project for the 2006/2007 and 2007/2008 financial years. Consultants will be appointed to the preliminary design, design tendering process and supervision and management of the implantation project. Please make sure this project has been budgeted for. 14. Storm water and drainage roads - Atkinson Place

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The project sent to me in a letter dated 3/12/04 re Atinkson Place, from the Roads Department, and attached report from SRK Consulting, needs to be identified and budgeted for.

15. BILL STEWARD NATURE RESERVE • Safety in this reserve is a major problem. Cases of rape and murder have happened and complaints of criminal activities in the reserve were received. Security patrols must be increased to this area. • This is a sensitive nature area that need to be protected. It contains very rare fauna and flora, and ecological diggings have been found in the reserve. • It is requested that the reserve be fenced in with proper access control. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 21 Ward Councillor

T Campbell

Needs identified 1. Palisade fencing Hattingh Park – Primrose 2. Street calming circles or speed humps; • 4th Avenue - Marlands • Cnr 2nd Avenue and 3rd Street on S bend – Marlands • Cactus Road, on S bend – Primrose • Acasia Road – Primrose • Churchill and Ash Street on S bend – Primrose • Armada Road – Rustivia (with a height restriction) • Beaconsfield Road, at Primrose Primary needs to be shifted into correct position 3. Pedestrian Robots for Primrose: • Rietfontein Road opposite the ABSA Bank Pedestrian Robot • Rietfontein Road opposite Words of Wisdom and Eastern Pharmacy, Pedestrian Robot 4. Solid Waste programme for waste collection twice weekly at Makause informal settlement 5. Upgrading of Rietfontein Road business district, Primrose - all sidewalks to be relaid and parking bays to be repainted. Urban renewal needs to take place in business district 6. Placing of dustbins in Rietfontein Road, Shamrock Road, business district Primrose 7. Upgrading of sewerage pipes in the entire Ward 21 8. Wannenburg Clinic to be upgraded and relocated to a more accessible area near the Library, Old Aged homes, Taxi routes and Police Station 9. Upgrading of roads, markings and signage of roads in Ward 21 10. Water meter audit to take place on faulty water meters and electricity meters 11. A community hall is a great need in this Ward; there are no halls for the use of the public 12. Upgrading of Rates building, Sunflower Road, Primrose ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 22 Ward Councillor

J. Louw

Needs identified 1. Budget allocation for Dayan Tennis Club • Hard court resurfacing (4 courts) • A huge drainage problem • Poles and fencing of courts, and painting of the poles 2. Infrastructure Services- Outstanding projects per Capsys Ref no.

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• • • • • •

959 - K90 Rietfontein Subway 1198 - North Rand Road 1341 - Springbok at Jones 955 - Witfield Flood Plan 1383- Kelly Right Turn 1804 - Main Sewer Bardene

3. Roads Infrastructure. • Berryl Street access to Bell Equipment • Parking Volle Evangelie Kerk Boksburg North • Road resurfacing - Kettles Street Ravensklip. • Road rebuild/ construction Stein Street Ravensklip. • Road resurface: PitoutStreet. StaatsStreet, VrystaatStreet. RoweStreet, Ravensklip, Jetparkroad Elandsfontein, Innes road Jet Park, Patrick Road Jet Park, Kelly Road Jet park. Intersection Elizabeth/ North Rand Road. • Resurface of Olivia Street Beyerspark in front of ST. Frances Care Centre, as well as upgrading of pavement and speed calming in Olivia Street. • Pedestrian crossing in front of St Frances Care Centre. • Widening of North Rand Road from Rietfontein to Pretoria Road. • Widening of Ridge road from Trichard road to Elizabeth. • Kerbing in Leith Road Bartlett. 4. Sport and recreation. • Boksburg North swimming pool - upgrading of infrastructure including Heating System • Centenary Hall Boksburg North - re-vamp, upgrade. • Construction of retainer wall for fountain and park development in StienStreet Ravensklip. 5. Street lights Upgrade. • O Hare Street Jansen Park. • Yaldwin Street Jet Park. • Scholtz Street Witfield. • Edgar Street Witfield. • Quantril Street Witfield. 6. Street calming measures • Findel Road Witkoppie Ridge. • Diaz Road Witkoppie Ridge. • Buffalo Road Witkoppie Ridge. • Allouette Road Witkoppie Ridge. 7. Water pipe infrastructure is very old in ward 22 and need upgrading as well as new installation. 8. Electricity - engineers need to plan to upgrade infrastructure -- too technical to give detail. __________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 23 Ward Councillor

A. du Plessis

Needs identified 1. Build library in Bonaero Park at Clinic grounds (plans already done).

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2. Take into account the present rate of developments, then project this into the next coming 10 to 20 years, and start implementing upgrade plans for services to this ward on a 3, 5, 8, 10, 15 and 20 year programme, plus the maintenance and sustainability thereof into the future. 3. Bonaero Park requires a parking facility (taxi rank) for the 15-20 vehicles that transport the scholars to Bonaero Park Primary School on a daily basis. They park all over the suburb at present, with no ablution facilities. 4. Stormwater drainage problems: • Corner of Calvina and Vryburg Streets Brentwood Park. • All storm water from ACSA • Atlas Road culvert underneath to Clearwater Estates northern boundary. • Low lying properties in Atlasville, Falcon, Toekan, Cockatoo, Venusand Goud Streets. • Great North Road and Louisa Road • A trench exists along Caravelle Road, Impala Park, which is very often overgrown. Is this trench serving any purpose for storm water drainage and can a pipe is installed? • Serious storm water drainage problems on Great North Road, western side in front of ANZAC, reinforcing on the corner of Great North Road and number two becomes Stanley Road on the opposite side of Great North Road. This factory is constantly flooded every time it rains, as there is insufficient drainage of storm water due to Great North Road having been built so high up. Serious storm water drainage problems on Great North Road, opposite Caravan sales on corner of Louisa and Great North Road. 5. Auret Road in Brentwood Park is receiving a lot more traffic due to all the townhouses developments and consideration must be given to closing it off at one end - preferably on High Road. 6. Roads that need upgrading. • Auret Road, Brentwood Park • Van Wyk Road, Brentwood Park • Road Number Five, Brentwood Park • Constantia Road, Pomona • Maple Road, Pomona • Elgin Road, Pomona • Deodar Road, Pomona • There seems to be no progress on the upgrading of these roads, yet numerous commercial developments are being approved. Already these roads do not cope adequately with the heavy vehicles utilising them on a daily basis. 7. Speed Humps/ Traffic Calming Measures. • Calvinia Road and Vryburg Road – Brentwood Park Laerskool 9 (still waiting after 3 years - already approved) • Venus Street - Atlasville, at Ashton College • Stokroos Street - Northmead between Mimosa and Celia Nestadt Streets. • Mirabel Street leading into Porta Amelia Street, Bonaero Park. 8. Taxi Rank to be built on Vic Reece Park, Great North Road next to Sentra Shopping Centre, Brentwood Park hundreds of commuters have no shelter or ablution facilities. 9. Street lighting on Brentwood Road to be upgraded 10. Brentwood Road to be upgraded 11. Renew Street names and signs in Impala Park and Atlasville 12. Tree prunning cycle to all suburbs once a year

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13. Playground equipment in parks • Corner of Swellendam and Hope Town Streets Brentwood Park • Flamboyant and Lantana Street Northvilla • Buks, Williams Park, Impala Park. 14. Illegal dumping • Serious problems throughout the Ward, specifically: a. open piece of property between Atlas road, Brentwood road and Finch Road, Atlasville b. Busschau Road, Caro Nome c. Road number 3, Brentwood Park d. Road number 5, Brentwood Park e. Venus Road Atlasville 15. Needs for Bonaero Park Clinic • Wheelchair • Mounted bench on the outside of the clinic wall • Extension of the drug storeroom • Relocation of palisade fence • Electronic automated gate • Painting of clinic • Security gate for workers room, front and back doors • Glass window at the waiting area • Polycomp teller system • Music in waiting area • It has been a request that a permanent ambulance service be allocated to this clinic as patients very often wait more than one hour for an ambulance 16. With reference to poverty alleviation, I request that the one orphanage and three havens for homeless people be given a reduction on their water, electricity, sanitation and refuse removal accounts. They are • Beula Children’s Village situated in Second Avenue, Bredell • Manger Mission situated on High Road and Lennox Road, Nortons Home Estate • Nu-life Ministries situated on High Road, next to Fairwinds Caravan Park. • Elim Havens situated on Da Costa Road, Bredell. 17. The Blaauwpan Dam sale issue as well as the Africa Hall of Fame issue also to be addressed and resolved. 18. Public safety • The traffic light intersection on the corner of Great North Road and Brentwood Park Road urgently requires a turn right arrow facility when travelling along Brentwood Road from west to east, wanting to turn right i.e south, into Great North Road. Numerous serious accidents have occurred at this intersection. • A traffic light needs to be installed at the corner of Celia Nestadt and Calvinia Roads especially now that a new shopping complex and a gym are being developed on the southern side of Celia Nestadt. • A traffic light needs to be installed at the corner of Mimosa and Stokroos Streets. 19. Sports, Recreation, Arts & Culture • The Jukskei facilities at Buks Williams Park in Impala Park need to be cleaned out and replanted with lawn as they are no longer functional. • The bulding and facilities at the Buks Willian Park/Lapa in Impala Park require painting.

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• • •

The recreational hall on Elizabeth Road in Impala Park needs urgent attention where the building has been damaged due to subsidience of the soil. The one facility being used as a clinic is not acceptable. The access road into the Bonaero Park soccer facility needs upgrading. The park along Star Street, Atlasville, is constantly being abused by Quad Bikers and other vehicles. Bollards must be installed along the Street as well as on the western side along Nightingale and Cockatoo Street. The lamp posts and lighting also requires regular maintenance and repair.

20. Solid waste • The satellite dump for garden refuse in Impala Park is in serious need of upgrading and maintenance as well as high quality management. The very large skips are also not very “friendly” and are too high to reach. 21. Environmental issues. • Sustainable development for any smart and developmental city is not only about developing residential and commercial infrastructure, but also about conserving the environment. Cognisance must be taken of our rapidly dwindling natural eco systems within our Metro, especially around the O.R Tambo International Airport. Our environmental development department is critically understaffed with insufficient, expertly qualified personnel and equipment, thus resulting in delayed responses to developments. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality should also look into the possibility of purchasing additional wetlands and eco-sensitive areas, i.e. Parkhaven and Caro Nome. We should become renowned for being the ”Smart, Developmental Green City”, that the people and businesses want to settle in, rather than the smart city that developed too fast to cope with sustainable resources, and that people and businesses merely pass through, to greener pastures. 22. Roads and traffic calming measures • Traffic calming measures should be considered at these points: Daeraad & Carp, Carp & Carp, Louis Botha & Marco Polo, Templehof & Louis Botha, D.F Malan & Louis Botha, Logan & Louis Botha, Caro & Marignane, Caro & Geldenhuys, Dalcross & Mirabel, Mirabel & Lanseria, Mirabel, Porto Amelia, Malpensa, Bonaero Drive, J.B.M Hertzog, D.F Malan, Bonaero Park General. 23. Land use • There should be an enforcement of development, upgrade, protection, and control in Bonaero Park Extension 3. 24. Transportation • Lack of public transport - reintroduce an affordable (subsidised) public bus service using low capacity vehicles i.e. 29/30 seats. High frequency during the hours: 06h00 to 08h00 and 16h00 to 20h00. Low frequency from 08h01 until 15h59. No service after 20h00. 25. Parks and recreational. • Mirabel - removal of blue gum trees and replace with indigenous trees, in line with the ministry of environment requirements. The existing trees are thirty plus years in age and are a constant danger during stormy weather. • Blaauwpan - total rehabilitation of the only park in Kempton Park offering fishing and picnic sports. Upgrading park roads from dirt to full tar with the introduction of traffic calming devices. • Bonaero Park Road verges, side walks and public parks -introduce a planned maintenance structure that is achievable. This plan to incorporate the trimming, pruning, and replacement of trees within the suburb. Most trees are thirty years old and will die from natural causes during the next few years. • Bonaero Park Soccer Field - repair and replace fencing and entrance gate, changing rooms and tennis courts, upgrade the roads from dirt to tar. Introduce proper car parking space.

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26. Storm Water Drains. • All storm water drainage in Bonaero Park needs repairs. Flooding at the corner of Aldergrove, Arlanda and Aeroparque during rainstorms. • Water collects at Caro and Marignane during rains and is very slow to drain away. • At Bonaero Park ext 1, numerous storm water drain covers are either broken or missing along Mirabel Street, Harewood, Essendon and Eldorado. 27. Sewerage • The current sewerage (health hazard) pump is situated at the Blaauwpan and the corner of Essendon/Eldorado Street often leaks raw sewerage. These pumping stations are thirty years old and during the rainy season can barely cope with the demand made of them. The introduction of new housing developments within the suburb has stretched the capacity of the pumps beyond their designed capacity. __________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 24 Ward Councillor

B. Robinson

Needs identified 1. General • The Ward is becoming very popular for townhouse developments. The infrastructure services are not designed for these developments. • An urgent requirement is that all infrastructure should be upgraded to accommodate the vast amount of developments. 2. Albert Luthuli Park • Electricity for all the houses (Ext 4.), Informal soccer field. • Clinic,Taxi stand, Maintenance of all roads, Streetlights / Street names. 3. VAN RYN Agricultural Holdings • Upgrading of Putfontein Road, Maintenance of all roads. • Storm water construction, Traffic Signs. • Upgrading of Cloverdene Street, as it is becoming very busy. 4. Crystal Park • Upgrading of Clinic. • Maintenance of all roads. • Investigation into water pressure and supply. • Upgrading of access roads. • Investigation of infrastructure and services for new township development to the East. 5. Fairleads Agricultural Holdings • Upgrading of roads. • Street lights. • Upgrading of Eva Road, as it has become very busy. 6. Slaterville Agricultural Holdings • Upgrading of roads • Upgrading of Wattle Road, because it has become a very busy road.

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7. Valkhoogte X5 (Country view) • Fencing of all pans because of environmental sensitivity. • Maintenance of tar roads. 8. Rynfield (Council of the care of the aged) • Construction of walkway and crossing for Ryn Park 1, 2 and 3. 9. Rynfield Agricultural Holdings • Urgent upgrading of Vlei and Uys Street. • Streetlights • Upgrading of all roads. 10. Benoni Small Farm • Upgrading of all roads. • Robot at corner of Elgin and Glen Gary Road (Benoni Road) • Street lights. • Investigation of natural flow of rainwater. 11. Benoni North Agricultural Holdings • Upgrading of roads. • Street lights. • Investigation of Celia Nestadt Road, and possible upgrading. • Investigation of traffic patterns through the area. 12. Northon home estates • Upgrading of all roads. • Investigation in the traffic density of High Road, and the upgrading to accommodate high traffic usage. • Street lights. • Upgrading of electricity distribution. • Upgrading of Spatial Development Plan. 13. Bredel Agricultural Holdings • Upgrading of all roads. • Construction of informal Industrial Park. • Urgent upgrading of electricity distribution. • Street lights. • Clinic (new). • Community Hall. 14. Pomona townships • Upgrading of all the roads. • Investigation and upgrading of all access roads to accommodate new developments. • Upgrading of all services to cater for new developments. 15. Pomona agricultural holdings • Upgrading of all roads • Electricity upgrade to system • Upgrading of northern part of Pomona Road • Creation of informal Industrial Park. __________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 25 Ward Councillor

G. Mofokeng

Needs identified 1. Mayfield1, Mayfield 6, Mogoba and Masakhane • Proclaiming, layout plan to be finalised by Province – speed up • Street lights, water, toilets, sewerage, storm water drainage, roads, grass cutting and waste removal • Houses, playgrounds/sports facilities, multi purpose centre, shopping centre • Clinic and ambulance, police station, fire station, hospital, mobile clinic every week • Library, post office 2. Mgababa and Varkfontein • Old houses to be renovated • Sewerage drainage, water and toilets • Electric and high mast lights • School renovations and toilets • Clinic and ambulance 3. Ext 12, 5 and 6 • Tarred roads, Street names, toilets, houses and old aged homes • High mast lights and Street lights, Eskom electricity cable to reconnected, storm water drainage, manholes to be maintained, swimming pool, sewer line to be maintained • Graveyard to be upgraded, Eskom power station to be upgraded, ambulance and mobile clinic every week 4. Makhulu Plaas • Tarred road, Street names, ambulance and mobile clinic every week, storm water drainage • Old farmhouses to be renovated, toilets, hospital and clinic (mobile) every week, police station, post office, taxi rank and public transport. 5. Petit, Putfontein and Bapsfontein • Gravel roads to be tarred, Street and traffic lights to be installed • Gumbi road to be completed, unutilised building to be proper utilised • Agricultural land to be made available • Street lights, culming measures to be installed at Luri road and Du Rant road. __________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 26 Ward Councillor

M. Zwane

Needs identified 1. Etwatwa ext 35- Combizza- Harry Gwala • Water, sewer, Street lights, tarred roads • There are only ten communal taps to supply the whole area; urgent help is needed concerning this matter. 2. Emergency services • Police, ambulance, and fire fighters do not enter this area as there are no roads and Streets

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3. Roads and storm water management • The whole Ward needs storm water management attention. There is urgency for preparation of gravel roads within the Ward. During rainy season, there is a lot of soil erosion and this causes many portholes to the extent that emergency vehicles cannot enter into these Streets. Residents are forced by emergency officials to come nearer to the Streets, which for some are more 3km away, and this makes it very difficult for our community to get services. 4. Streets • We need to prioritise Street names as these also affects services, as people are not able to locate these areas. 5. Ward description • This Ward is characterised by informal houses for low-income groups as well as large informal settlements. The Barcelona clinic is situated in this Ward and the area is very densely populated with few formal layout plans in existence. 6. Needs identified • Electricity, Street and high mast lighting, roads (new resurfacing), sports facilities • Water supply, sewerage, clinics, emergency, housing development, poverty alleviation __________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 27 Ward Councillor

G.Kriek

Needs identified 1. One aspect that does need more attention is the basic infrastructure, namely the provision of electricity, water and sewerage. 2. With the increase in densification through townhouse development and sub-divisions, added pressure is being placed on these services and a plan needs to be implemented to ensure that water pressure remains at acceptable levels and that the electricity supply is secured. 3. Further, road maintenance remains essential to ensure that the cost of repair in the long term is kept as low as possible. 4. Rynfield, Airfield, Morehill parks must be cleaned 5 times per year (grass cutting). __________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 28 Ward Councillor

S. Grolman

Needs identified 1. 2.

3.

Potholes- all over the ward Traffic calming measures - I was advised that speed humps would be built in King Street, Westdene, Benoni. That was a year ago and still nothing has been done. These speed humps had been budgeted for and passed as necessary - we are still waiting. Noise pollution - taxis make a great amount of noise pollution (blowing hooters, loud music etc.) from 5 am all day outside Cameron Mews and Cameron Court, from Harper Avenue, up Kimbelton Street to Amphill Avenue. This must be stopped.

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There are houses in Farrarmere Gardens which do not have water metres, these include: Stamvrug street, Lionear Street and Flax street. This area is a low cost housing area and many of the people are pensioners and are not benefiting from the free basic services as they are paying a monthly flat rate of R30.00 for water as there are no metres to be read. STORMWATER PROBLEMS There are problems with the run off stormwater from Uys Krige Street down to Homestead Dam. It appears that with all the townhouses being built in the Farrarmere area that the stormwater infrastructure in not coping and when the water runs downhill there is a problem. At the same time the residents in the said area are complaining that when it rains that the sewerage systems also overflow.

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COLLAPSED SEWERAGE SYSTEM The infrastructure in Farrarmere Gardens appears to have collapsed in the following areas: Stamvrug Street, Lionsear Street and Flax Street. The residents in these streets are continuously having blocked sewerage problems which are unable to be repaired permanently. ABANDONED HOUSES There are numerous abandoned houses. The owners appear to be unable to be contacted and rates etc are owed to the Metro. These houses are overgrown and together with illegal dumping are becoming a rate haven and health hazard. The details can be obtained from the Rates Department and the EMPD. There are about six such houses in Balfour Street. Benoni South with squatters who are using the area under the railway bridge as their ablution area. There are two houses in Western Extension that have been burned and need to be demolished or rebuilt for the same reason. NOTICE ON ROBOTS Beggars, selling and crime at the robots are high because of the people swarming around the intersections. In Kempton Park there are notices on all the robots stating that this behaviour is illegal and the problem there appears to be under control. Please could this be done in the Benoni area and throughout the Metro. Possibly a bylaw needs to be put in place however we would appeal that this be done in Benoni asap as a precedent has been made in Kempton Park. ILLEGAL DUMPING EVEN OF BUILDING RUBBLE. Open spaces especially around Farrarmere Gardens and opposite Benoni SPCA in Kelin Street Lakefield – there are no “No Dumping” sighns. Possibly a meeting/ forum with the developers and contractors needs to be held as this problem appears to be getting worse. RESURFACING OF ROADS Some roads have deteriorated badly in the ward and include:Oak street at the intersection of Village Road Farrarmere – potholes have potholes. The road between Main Road and Lakefield Road Lakefield, past Planet fitness gym – the potholes have potholes. Parts of Main Road Farrarmere are cracking – this is a main road. Bailey street parking area outside the Bayley street shops – area very uneven. BENONI RATES HALL/ LIBRARY/ ADMIN BUILDINGS AND BENONI TOWN HALL The buildings are diryt. The area around the buildings is full of bird droppings and litter and certain areas smell of human excreta. The gardens are overgrown and unkept. The grass is not cut regularly. TITLE DEED HAND OVER There are only about twenty people living in the low cost housing area called Farrarmere Gardens who have received their title deeds. There are about another 100 houses there. Tow years ago the people were told that this situation was at an advanced stage. Please could this be investigated? WATER PRESSURE IN THE BENONI AREA. The water pressure in the area is very poor. We have been told that the water infrastructure needs to be replaced; the water pressure has been turned down to prevent pipes bursting. Fire hydrants with too little pressure could become a problem during fires. Areas where there is a lot of people traffic get blocked toilets as the cisterns are unable to fill up in between usages. This could develop into a disaster in terms of fire and a health hazard in terms of sewerage spills. METAL LITTER BINS FOR THE LAMP POLES. People are littering because of the shortage of litter bins. The bins possibly should be metal as people put cigarettes into these facilities. There has been no response to the requests therefore accumulates around the poles on the grass. REFUSE REMOVAL FROM BINS IN PARKS AND OTHER PUBLIC AREAS Bins are provided in some areas but are not emptied before and after weekends especially when there is a long weekend eg. Xmas, New Year and Easter.

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HIGH MAST LIGHTING The low cost housing area, Farrarmere Gardens is very dark and there is a lot of open undeveloped land around the area. Could high mast lighting be considered for the safety of the people and to prevent illegal dumping as this is occurring at night? ALLIEN TREES The open land around Farrarmere Gardens has numerous alien trees in the open land. They are cut from time to time but the stumps are not poisoned and removed and they grow again stronger and bigger. From time to time there are squatters living amongst the trees. It has been reported that these trees provide cover for drug transactions. GRAFFITTI Please could the graffiti be removed/painted over at the Benoni Town hall, the ablution facilities at Homestead Lake and the fountain at the corner of Triekieve and Main Road Farrarmere. PRUNING OF TREES ON THE PAVEMENTS. The trees throughout the ward are obstructing the street lights at nigh, some areas have been attended to when crime was reported and evaluations were done concerning the quality of light in the area. HERRITAGE STATUS OF FARRARMERE GARDENS/ GOVERNMENT VILLAGE An application was done for this. Please could we know how far this has gone as there is already one house that has been demolished and two houses were built in its place? There is already an electricity problem as it appears that the developer took the electricity from the house next door and now there is insufficient power for the three houses. HAWKERS AREA IN CBD The hawkers are covering the pavements and are area for them to operate is needed. An area like the Durban Indian Market could possibly solve the problem. There is land in the CBD between Bedford and Howard avenue, and between Voortrekker and Rothsay streets. SUBSIDING OF GROUND There is possibly unstable ground in Farrarmere Gardens as some of the houses have subsided ie. 16A Stamvrug, 6 Stamvrug and 6 Alida Close. LITTER Picking up of litter at the Benoni Town Hall and the CBD is needed. What happened to the EPWP we have many unemployed people in the ward and they could be used to do this and help their economic status at the same time. SCHOOLS There is a need for another high school in Benoni. The primary schools do not have enough feeder high schools in the area. The abandoned school in Liverpool Street Benoni South could be refurbished and used at a school again. The position of this school is also good as it is near to the station and the taxi ranks. I understand that this old school is a heritage site but that does not mean that the area should be used for its original purpose. With all the development in Benoni as well as children being bussed into the schools in the area, the schools are not coping and we will possibly need another primary and two high schools in the area. SPORT FACILITIES There is a need for areas to be cleared for the use of soccer trainers in the ward. An area is needed in Farrarmere Gardens behind the halls and another one is needed near town. Requests have been put in for the clearing of the old soccer field at the Liverpool Street School. It would be suitable and accessible to the children from the CBD and Western Extension Area. At present the children are trying to train on the ground around the Benoni Town Hall. The open land is not being used and could provide areas to encourage our young sportsmen and women of the future.

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WARD 29 Ward Councillor

E Motara

Needs identified 1. Housing • Upgrade the hostel. • RDP houses needed – informal settlements 2. Roads • Maintenance of roads i.e. potholes, road signs and roads markings. • Upgrading of Reading and Styx roads. 3. Speed humps requested in the following Streets o Wattville o Mabuya Street, opposite Solomon Motlana School. o Dube Street, opposite the park o o o o

Actonville Mayet Drive, opposite Actonville Primary School Moodley Street Wynberg Street , near William Hills School

o o

Mckenzie park Weaver Avenue, opposite the park

4. Traffic calming measure • Traffic circle at the cnr. of Parow and Knysna Streets 5. Storm water drains • Poor state of the drains at the Streets mentioned below causes heavy flooding during the rainy season. Upgrading is urgently needed. o Wattville-Kekana Street o Actonville-Styx Street, Birmingham Road, cnr. Patel and Kapitan Street, cnr. Surtee and Kapitan Street, cnr. Mayet Drive and Soma Street, cnr. Mayet Drive and Chetty Street. 6. Electricity • Wattville o Area known as Rooikamp - upgrading needed as residents experience constant power outages. • Nestadt Industrial Area Dunswart o Power outage causes business loss. • Actonville i. Council flats high mast or equivalent 9. Parks • •

Wattville o Rehabilitation of park at Mabuya Street Actonvillle o Fencing of Ellis Street Park adjacent to Benoni Primary School o Playground equipment to be installed in parks o General upkeep of parks

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10. Land •

Actonvillle - dire need for a youth centre and a centre for the senior citizens

11. Economics • Flea market to be established for informal traders. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 30 Ward Councillor

K.E RAMEGO

Needs identified

1. All the Streets in Wattville have potholes and some of the Streets need to be tarred 2. Tamboville Streets, namely Abe Nyalunga, Riba and WCRC, have not been touched since 1995 3. There is storm water drainage which is not attended to at Nobhadula and Mamkeli Streets though the Councillor reported that to Moss Maliba in 2006 4. All the parks in Wattville have long grass and that also was reported to the Parks Dept. - to date nothing has happened. _______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 31 Ward Councillor

K Noonan

Needs identified 1. Street Lights • Area Tamboville; Geluksdal; Withok Estates – Extra high mast lighting needs to be installed in the above areas; The residents have requested this, as the areas are very badly lit. • Street lights needed along Gerrie Swart Drive between Barry Marais and Rangeview. • High mast light on the corner of Umkumaas and Augrabies Streets in Dalpark X 6 2. Roads to be tarred • Areas o Minnebron (entire) o The state of the roads is a disgrace. The situation needs to be attended to with immediate effect. I have been inundated with complaints regarding the number of potholes in the area. o Tamboville (entire area) o Leachville Ext 2 and 3 o Withok Estate (entire area) • The residents have asked that their roads be tarred for easier access. The rain causes the dirt and gravel road to turn into mud and this poses a danger to motorists. Once approved could the council them place proper and readable road signs and road names. 3. Storm Water Management and installation • Areas o Van Dyk Park – the situation is not being managed and thus is a problem. Could the council please investigates the matter and maks provisions in its budget to have the problem solved. o Tamboville – is in need of storm water facilities o Geluksdal ext 3 – is in need of storm water facilities' o Geluksdal Ext 2'

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4. Water Reticulation • Areas Geluksdal Ext 3 – Development is being done in the area but the residents are not prepared to move into their RDP housing, unless there is a guarantee they will receive proper sanitation, electricity and basis water supply. Please could the department keep me informed of the development status in order assess the situation properly and to inform the community accordingly. 5. Illegal Dumping • Area o Entire ward but particularly: o Van Eck Park o Tamboville o Geluksdale o

The situation is out of control. Please could the council either provide further skip bins or place new bins in these areas and ensure that they are removed on a regular basis. We know that residents are also to blame, as they themselves do not always use the bins provided. We need to approach this through education and by asking the department to look into providing this service to the communities.

6. Roads and Transport Department • Area o Dalpark Ext 1 o Community centre – Opposite Carnival City o The business owners have asked that the department please provide proper markings for parking. 7. SRAC Area o Tamboville – residents have asked that a soccer field and/or a sports facility be provided for the community but more particularly the youth. o Minnebron Tennis Club – The tennis club desperately needs renovating o Dalpark ext 1 – The youth in the area have no recreational facilities other than the Ten Pin bowling club and Carnival City. This is rather costly for them. They have asked that, since the Ten Pin Bowling Alley and other businesses operate on council owned land, that some space is provided from the parking area for a skateboard park or paintball facilities. 8. Long grass area • Entire ward – the long grass within the ward is a huge concern for all residents. • Residents have feared for their safety as they have to walk through open fields where the grass is too long • Motorists have complained that the long grass at intersections hinders their sight of oncoming traffic. • Illegal dumping takes place in many areas were there is long grass and the residents are concerned that there will be an infestation of rats. Causing a health problem. • Please could the department budget that grass is cut on an ongoing basis and that once cut is removed. • I must mention since my inception 01/03/06, I have received good support from Jan Sigtig in the cutting of grass Theft of electrical cables • This has been a nightmare o Withok Estate – the residents are often left in dark as cables are stolen. Could the council please attend to and monitor the situation. The residents are situated on plots and fear for their safety.

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10. Health Tamboville, Leachvill:e there are plans to build clinics within the next 3 to 4 year in these areas. However could the council please provide mobile clinics that provide a full service to the community should there not be such a service already? 11. Traffic Lights • Traffic lights are often not working. I ask that the department budget for regular checks and maintenance be done and that any problems are solved quickly. 12. Public Safety – Metro Police • Area o Tamboville o Leachville o Motorists/ taxi drivers often use the open veld leading from Tamboville to Leachville and not the roads provided to transport residents to and from work. o Certain residents are concerned for their children’s safety as they often walk through this veld. The amount of illegal dumping that takes place in this area is also a cause for concern. o 'The fencing along Tigerwood Road (Dalpart 6 and Leachville) is broken, posing a high crime and thoroughfare problem. Besides above, the rest remains same. 13. Housing • Area o Tamboville o Geluksdale o Proper housing facilities in these areas need to be completed. o A note of concern is the number of young children “begging” at Street lights. Often parents use their children as an emotional tool to get money from the many motorists travelling in the area within ward 31. o Although this is a social problem, should the council have a programme to house Street children and/or if the metro police have the power to stop parents using their children to “beg”? I would greatly appreciate your advice on this matter? ___________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 32 Ward Councillor

M.J MASON

Needs identified 1. Storm water drains must be proactively cleaned before the rainy season. 2. Leaves and branches must be cleaned off the side walks in suburbs where there are a large number of trees, these blocks drains. 3. Street names must be painted on kerb stones. 4. The mine owned ground must be cleaned and cut by the mine or the metro. 5. Lines must be continuously painted onto the roads when the paint fades. 6. Electricity departments must be proactive and must look for Street lights which are out - currently a light is only fixed if the member of the public or the councillor reports it. 7. Yield and stop signs must be replaced when flattened in accidents. This sometimes takes months. 8. All trees on side walks must be pruned regularly. 9. The Streets in the Boksburg CBD must be cleaned daily. 10. The parks in the city must be tidied up daily. 11. The municipal offices (rates hall) are a disgrace and must be cleaned daily. 12. The stadium in Jubilee road has been neglected for years. This is a major asset to all in Ekurhuleni and must be maintained.

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13. Potholes must be repaired regularly and not left. 14. The old post office theatre in the CBD is in need of urgent repairs. This facility is used often and is one of the only venues of this sort in Boksburg for live theatre. 15. The necessary infrastructure must be in place to support the envisaged Leeuwpoort 113 IR development. This to include electricity supply, storm water drainage and sewerage. 16. The town hall, Civic Centre Hall and Library Auditorium must be properly maintained and kept clean. This is not done and the public are expected to hire and pay for sub-standard facilities. 17. We require a speed hump in Cresta Road, Sunward Park opposite number 49, to stop traffic speeding down this section of the road. Learners from Sunward Park High walk down this road to the taxi rank and it is not going to be long before we have a tragic accident here. I have been requesting this for the past two years- can something please be done now? 18. Boksburg Lake is a major tourist asset to Ekurhuleni and requires attention. Pollution must be stopped, security must be stepped up and the facilities at the Lake must be repaired and maintained. There does not seem to be any proactivity any more, as there was in the “Old” Boksburg. Repairs are only carried out when issues are reported – and sometimes not even then. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 33 Ward Councillor

M MBHEM

Needs identified 1. Housing development project, No single housing project in the ward, the ward consists of the following areas: Delmas, Chris Hani, Jerusalem, Kanana, Tambo, Comet and Driefontein Informal Settlements. 2. Electricity, Billing system that reflects approximation of rates is unacceptable. 3. Multi-purpose centres community halls, The whole ward e.g. Delmore Park and Delmore Gardens , has no community halls. 4. Clinic, The whole ward does not have any clinics. The community travels long distances to neighbouring Reiger Park, Boksburg and Boksburg North. 5. Sports facility, Whole ward does not have a proper sports ground. 6. School, The whole ward does not have a school (primary and secondary) 7. Safety and security, The whole ward does not have any police or satellite station. 8. Pollution, Delmore (park and gardens) is affected by air pollution as the area is next to the mine dump. Comet and surrounding areas need dumping bins. 9. Economic Development Projects, Delmore (park and gardens) and all informal settlements are affected by the high rate of unemployment. 10. Storm water management, The whole ward does not have storm water drainage (in the rainy season children swim in the dirty/Street water) _____________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 34 Ward Councillor

D. SCHOLTZ

Needs identified 1. CIVIC CENTRE • Palisade fencing around civic centre to be repaired and painted (burglaries prevalent) • Roof to be waterproofed and painted. • All metal facias to be painted. • Upgrade of garden in general. • Section of ceiling to be repaired/councillor’s office.

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2. REIGER PARK FLATS • Replace water geysers at flats, 102 units. • Repair / replace water pipes. • Replace roof sheets. • Upgrade parks. • Allocate new area for informal traders. • Drainage system. 3. SPEED CALMING HUMPS • John Collins Street • Gerry Oberholzer Street • Goedehoop Street • Leon Ferreira Drive • Archie Jonas Road • Saint Anthony • Archie Jonas - pave side walk • Taxi Bay 2 x Archie Jonas road • Widen Middle Road (entrance into Reiger Park) from CBD • Tar Flamboom Street 4. REIGER PARK GENERAL • Replace old underground water pipes • Upgrade electrical reticulation boxes in Streets • Install prepaid meter boxes • Relocate water meters in driveways • Storm water drains - St Anthonys Road and Flamboom Street • Continue with Street names - incomplete • New Street lights required near Church and William Street and Malva Street. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 35 Ward Councillor

M Xakambana

Needs identified 1. Housing • Slow delivery of houses is a problem • Title deeds – some of the houses in Germiston Ext 9 still belong to the original land owners - Wits Gold • No title deeds in Dukathole • Yard boundaries in Germiston Extension 9 is a problem • Unoccupied buildings in Pirrowville – breeding ground for crime • Proposed inclusion of Dukathole in top 20 PTP • Disabled and pensioners should be accorded priority status in terms of housing allocation (low cost housing) • Council should play an active role in terms of making sure that, after the death of their parents, childheaded families remain in their parents houses - relatives or so called guardians tend to abuse them • Transfer of houses in Purrowville to the occupants • Housing status quo -Ulan and Good Hope • Maintenance of Dukathole houses

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2. Education • No high school in the ward, only one school - Dukathole • School bus to ferry kids to various schools - Reigerpark, Katlehong and Elandsfontein • Dukathole only using two languages - English and Afrikaans 3. Economic development • Shortage of skills • Unemployment rife • Emerging contractors in the Ward not given opportunities when there are Ward projects • Local labour not always employed in Ward projects - contractors come with their own workers 4. Transport • Kutalo railway station closed • Formal Taxi Rank - Germiston Extension 9 • Shelter in informal Taxi Ranks - Good Hope and Esibayeni (next to Delmore Station) 5. Roads • Grading of main entrances to informal settlements • Surfacing and re-sealing in formal areas • Speed humps • Street Names - Pirrowville 6. Solid waste • Mass containers removed late - council informed us of the shortage of trucks to remove refuse • Refuse spilled by collectors left in the Street • Shortage of mass containers in informal settlements 7. Water • Lack of taps in informal settlements • Water leakages - taps • Water leak - Institute Street - Pirrowville, reoccurring constantly • Drainage - informal settlements • Storm water drainage - formal areas 8. Health • Running water • Mobile clinic in informal settlements • Upgrading of Dukathole clinic to include Ante Natal Clinic • Increase of HIV/AIDS in the Ward 9. Public safety • Visibility of SAPS poor • Late response when crime is reported • Increase in smash and grab - corner Knights and Lower Boksburg Roads. • Highjacking of goods trains in Ulana. Good Hope, Dukathole and Germiston ext 9 • Cable theft (trains) 10. Electricity • High masts for informal settlement and open spaces • Illegal connection 11. Sanitation • Some toilets not functioning in Dukathole - public/ communal • Maintenance of public/ communal toilets in informal settlements 12. Recreational facilities • Upgrading of soccer grounds in Dukathole • Grading and preparing of playing grounds in informal settlements ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 36 Ward Councillor

C Patterson

Needs identified 1. SECTORS VACANT, MATTERS OF CONCERN, CHALLENGES • Heriotdale, Gosforth Park, Elanshaven, Jupiter, Simmerfield, Airport Park, Denlee, Webber, Parkhill Gardens, Lambton, Mimosa Park, Tedstoneville, Delville, South Germiston, West Germiston, Georgetown, East Germiston, Germiston CBD, Driehoek, Industries East, Wychwood Ext. • Street maintenance, calming and speed humps. • Cleaning of vacant stands throughout the ward • Graceland Housing application • Monitoring / Inspections of food stalls - Dekema Street • Metro Rail - Total neglect of rail line running through Germiston. Painting of Buildings, fixing fences, cutting grass & trees • Street name boards and road markings - All over Germiston and Germiston CBD • Islands and pavements in City Centre need upgrading & cleaning • Speeding of vehicles in Parkhill Rd & Denlee Area • Derelict and half completed buildings in ward 36, and illegal occupants to be removed • Pruning of trees on pavements • Ward Health and Social Development. • Ensuring that roads & Streets are maintained. • Library and Clinic for the community • Ensuring a smooth running Ward Committee • Implementation and enforcing of the By-laws • Encouraging development • Uplifting the City • Cleaning up Germiston • Returning pride to city • Encouraging investment ________________________________________________________________________ WARD 37 Ward Councillor B Haipel Needs identified 1. HIGH PRIORITY! • • •

• • • •

Sufficient Funds for review of LSDF Area 8 as requested by Ward Committee and forwarded to Council. Funds for the erection of a pedestrian bridge across Ring Road West at the level of the Union Hospital. This area is extremely dangerous as pedestrians climb over embankment and cross the Ring Road to catch taxis. Urgent funds are needed for the upgrading and landscaping of the whole CBD (Boulevard) area from Northern entrance (Dion and SARS) as far as and including Newmarket Development and Lemon Tree Centre, seeing that this area is one of the first areas where approval for consultants to do a study on urban regeneration has been approved. I have been in discussions with the developers of Newmarket who are investing R1billion in this area and would like to see this whole area turned into a vibrant CBD. (The fountain in Boulevard needs to be demolished or turned into a podium for music recitals) There is a desperate need for upgrading of water and sewer network in New Redruth and Alberton North (Water pressure cannot be increased in Alberton North due to the age of the pipes lower down, which would burst) At least R500 000.00 for storm water at the new SARS building As per Letter Ref 16/3/4/3/11 – RTCW 55/2004, money has been promised on this budget for a Wall extending from the Shell Garage at Ring Road West to Fore St. Money for consultants to do a study of the parking requirements in Alberton North.

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• • • •

Widening of Bodmin St and building of traffic circles Building of new Du Plessis St Taxi Rank and demolishing of old Rugby Pavilion next to Ring Road Erection of fence at end of Primrose St South Crest bordering R59 Planning for the promoting and requesting of proposals for the development of the empty land in front of Council Buildings in Alberton. 2. OPERATIONAL • Already requested and half done: Lights along Heidelberg Road between Black Reef Road and Leondale. • Resurfacing of roads throughout Ward 37 and road calming measures (in consultation with Councillor) • Paving of pedestrian facilities/sidewalks etc in Ward 37 (in consultation with Councillor) • Upgrading of Electrical Substations, especially Truida St. sub which often causes black-outs. • Finalisation of eviction of illegal residents of Informal Settlement in Alberton North and cleaning of area. • Finances for Contractor for the ongoing Cleaning of the Alberton Boulevard • Finances for Contractor for the ongoing Cleaning of the area between Ring Roads • Funds for new equipment for Parks • Funds for new equipment for Solid Waste • Funds for maintenance and further upgrading of Alberton Dam. • Secure Council property from Redruth St to North Eastern side of Ring Road West / corner Fore St., or sell the unused portion and secure Sub Station situated in one corner. Vagrants sleep here! (Consult with Councillor) • Secure Council property at old Piet Fick Rugby Stadion. • Maintenance of Taxi Ranks • Maintenance and cleaning of all Parks and open areas especially the Natalspruit in CBD area. • Consultation process for removal of hawkers and Illegal traders in Boulevard • Funds for removal of Illegal Dumping • Funds for removal of illegal advertising signs ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 38 Ward Councillor M Ansett Needs identified 1. Roads • Walkway paving at Meyersdal – the length of Blue Crane and Kingfisher, Brackenhurst – the length of Vermooten street, Brackendowns – Andries/Bracken Gate to Vaal street • Traffic speed limit signage to be upgraded • All roads needs upgrading to be able to handle the heavy traffic • The residents of Kamferbos street have paid a heavy price for living opposite Bracken High School. The road should be a one way street and the half walkway on the school side is next to the school fence therefore the mess on the roadside belongs to the council not the school and should be turned into parking and the road markings and speed humps clearly marked. • Speed humps needed in front of the three way stop at Louisa street, McBride street Brackehurst. Cars have gone through walls along this straight road because of speed and careless driving. Traffic speed limit signage to be upgraded. 2. Storm water/drainage and Sewer • Urgent upgrading of stormwater at the following: Between Hart and Hennie Alberts street. Ground water runoff from Meyersdal causes overflows at the lowest point in Hennie Alberts street and sewerage overflows in the centre of this busy dual carriageway are a common occurance. • With the new development in the Newmarket Park area the sewerage infrastructure needs to be upgraded as this area was , untill eighteen months ago an agricultural holdings. The roads all need upgrading to take the heavy increase in traffic. This is an URGENT matter. 3. Parks • The spruits on the Brackendowns Soetdoring/ Rooibos servitude should be cemented to stop heavy growth of plant life and refuse pile up.

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The same can be said for the spruit that runs from Hennie Albers into the Jackson street dam. This could serve as a recreational facility serving the public. 4. Jackson Street Dam • Fencing is an urgent need for the Jackson Street Dam to stop moronic behaviour and as well as night time criminal activities. This would mean a full time caretaker as well as toilet facilities and braai and play area to turn this into a worthwhile local park to serve the needs of all Albertonians. The dam to be linked to the Meyersdal Nature Area eventually. 5. Electricity • Install a second set of street lights on the Alice TO Swartkoppies Road, Brackenhurst. This stretch of road is very dark. ________________________________________________________________________ WARD 39 Ward Councillor R. RETIEF Needs identified 1. CLEAN UP OF THE WEIDEMAN DAMS IN ELSBURG • The item was brought to the attention of the Council by Councillor Naude about two years ago, but has not been attended to. It is considered urgent. 2. STORM WATER PROBLEMS AT WEIDEMAN DAMS IN ELSBURG • Properties on the south side of the Weideman Dams in Elsburg are flooded regularly after heavy rains. This problem was also brought to the attention of the council some years ago and has not being attended to. 3. DEKEMA ROAD EXTENSION TO ALBERTON. • The possibility of extending Dekema road in Wadeville to link up with Alberton has been discussed for some time. It will certainly improve access to Wadeville and should be undertaken as soon as possible. 4. N17 ON-RAMP AT GOSFORTH PARK • The construction of an on-ramp onto the N17 at Gosforth Park was shown on earlier IDPs and should be expedited. It is required to improve access to Wadeville. The off-ramp already exists. 5. MPROVEMENT OF THE SIDE WALKS IN ELSBURG CDB • The side walks in Elsburg CBD are old and should be upgraded. Money should be set aside for this purpose. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 40 Ward Councillor

M Maluleke

LEONDALE • Satellite Police Station • Grass Cutting/Cleaning of open spaces • Maintenance of storm water drains • Manholes with no leads • Sporting facilities • Youth Centre • Side walks SPRUITVIEW • Grass Cutting/Cleaning of open spaces • Unknown graves at Spruitview Gardens • Robots at Spruitview off ramp(N3) • Maintenance of storm water drains

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• • • • •

Manholes with no leads Side walks Sporting facilities High School Community Hall

MOTLOUNG • Houses • Roads • Storm water drains CROSS ROADS • Houses TSHONGWENI • Roads • Houses • Storm water drains NHLAPHO • Roads • Houses • Storm water drains ROODEKOP EXTENSION 31 • Roads • Robot at entrance from Katlehong • Street lights at entrances • Storm water drains • Side walks

____________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 41 Ward Councillor

B Nikani

Needs identified 13.

SPRUITVIEW 1.

SRAC • Multi-purpose park • Build public parks 2. Environment services 1. Maintenance of open spaces and parks Concrete refuse bins in public places 2. 3. Infrastructure service 1. Storm water drainage and side walks N3 offramp - redesign direction sign 2.

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3. 4. 14.

Built a taxi rank Community hall

LEONDALE • Environment service 1. Maintenance of open spaces and parks 2. Concrete refuse bins in public places 2. Infrastructure services 1. Storm water drainage and speed humps 2. Build a taxi rank 3. Public works 1. Build a police station

15. PHUMULA (ROODEKOP EXT 21/22) • Environment services 1. Maintenance of open spaces Concrete refuse bins in public places 2. • Infrastructure services Storm water drainas and side walks 1. Roads construction and maintenance 2. 3. Electrical reticulations (332 housing units) Traffic lights at Luvuyo and Leondale roads 4. 5. Build a taxi rank 16. RONDEBULT EXT 1/2 & ROODEKOP EXT 23 • Inter-departmental Build multi-purpose council admin precinct as a CCC to have community hall, pay-point, 1. library etc • Infrastructure services o Roads construction o Storm water drainage and sidewalks o Change conventional to prepaid meters o Upgrade sewer infrastructure o Build a taxi rank interlinked to a proposed rail transport station o Erect traffic lights at Heidelberg and Keratanela roads • SRAC o Build a multi purpose sports center o Build informal sports grounds and parks 17. KLIPPOORJIE/BUHLE PARK • Housing 1. Build houses for Roodekop informal settlement and neighbouring farm labourers at least 1000 units • Infrastructure services o Roads construction and maintenance o Storm water drainage and sidewalks o Build a taxi rank linked to the proposed transport station • SRAC o Sports facilities, library and parks • Health o Build a clinic

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______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 42 Ward Councillor Needs identified

C Bennetts

1. Roads • Tar roads in Egoli Village • Upgrading of Voortrekker Street • Upgrading of Elsburg CBD pavements and islands • Road calming measures needed at the intersection of Rondebult Street and Kingfisher Street 2. Speed humps • Speed humps on Sarel Hattingh road 3. Electrification • Elspark ext 7 & 8 • Egoli village 4. Traffic lights • Traffic lights at the intersection of Heidelberg Road and Bloemhof Street 5. Water problem • In Elspark residents experience continual problems with water pressure • Excessive bursts of water pipes result in massive water losses, inconveniencing residents and causing unnecessary expenditure to the council 6. Sports facilities • These are needed at Elspark, as is proper fencing to reduce vandalism, additional toilets and change rooms 7. Infrastructure • Maintenance of overgrown vacant stands. These are regarded by S.A.P.S as ‘Hot Spots’. The situation is absolutely disgraceful • Maintenance of road markings to enhance safety • Clean up of area. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 43 Ward Councillor

T Phaleng

Needs identified 1. EMM prepaid system • Conversion from conventional electricity meter to EMM prepaid electricity system at Dawn Park, Windmill Park ext 4 & 8, Villa Lisa ext 1. 2. Storm water and drainage system • upgrade needed at Dawn Park ext 35 3. Extension of the water reservoir at Dawn Park 4. Upgrade of the Dawn Park clinic to provide a comprehensive primary health care service in Dawn Park 5. Paving of Gallahad Street in Dawn Park and Elephant Street in Villa Lisa 6. Upgrade of sporting facilities and playing parks in Windmill Park, Dawn Park, Villa Lisa and Mapleton ext 10 7. Construction of Basikelele Street at Windmill Park, Luvuyo Street at mapleton, Villa Lisa ext 2& 3 8. Construction of the community hall with a library facility at Dawn Park, tennis court or Dawn Park primary school 9. Installation of EMM service paypoint & prepaid electricity at Dawn Park, Villa Lisa and Mapleton 10. Township establishment with mixed development along Barry Marais Road & Rondebult Road at Villa Lisa ext 1 & Windmill Park/Dawn Park Rondebult Corridor

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Upgrade of the station & the surrounding area at Dawn Park SAPS Station Construction of a pedestrian bridge over N3 Maple ext 10 Construction of Primary school - Villa Lisa ext 2 Township establishment - Rookraal Transit Camp. Electricity supply programme in the ward. (Conversion programme, Street lighting, access to electricity, maintenance and safety). 16. The inter-ward public transport programme. 17. The consolidation of the ward indigents register. 18. The implementation of a consistent environment maintenance programme in the ward - grass cutting. 19. Dawn Park • Walkways and pavement : Gallahad Street Bouhina Street around the Dawn Park primary school • Stormwater : 7 –houses at Saffran Street 20. Villa Lisa • Walkways and pavement: paving around the Villa Lisa School • Stormwater : Primrose Street at house no. 175-181 • Tertiary road: Lama Street at Villa Lisa ext 11 ______________________________________________________________________________________ 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

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WARD 44 Ward Councillor

P Bodiba

Needs identified 1. STORM WATER DRAINAGE • Ext 5 Moisilabele and Nombhela • Ext 5Thekwana Street • Ext11 • Ext30 Nombhela Drive • Ext 30 Lefokotsane Street • Ext 16 phase 1 and Phase 2 • Ext 1 Mokgako Street • Hattingh Drive • Cintso Street • Phenius Xulu Street 2. TRAFFIC MEASURES CALMING • Redsquare and Ingolwane Ext 23 • Nombela Drive from Bierman Road to Moagi Street • Thekwane Street 5 • Mosilabele Ext 5 • Kgokgoropo Ext 13 • Mokhehle road 1 • Phenius XuluExt1 3. HIGH MAST LIGHTS • New Ext 5 (2 needed) • Ext 16 phase 1 & phase 2 (2 needed) • Ext 13 (1) • Ext 30 behind the police station (1) • Ext 6 (needed 2) 4. UPGRADING OF PARKS • Lefokotsane Rd Ext 30 • Tholoane Park Ext 1 • Paradise Park Ext 13 5. MINI DUMPING SITES • Between Ext 6 & Ext 23 • Paradise Park Moagi Rd • Ext 5 between Nombhela & Lisika Roads • Ext 1 Botshabelo Road 6. UPGRADING OF INFORMAL SOCCER FIELD • Molapo ground Ext 1 Mokhehle Rd • Golden Triangle Sports Fields • Ext 30 Intukwane Rd • Ext 5 Ground Lisika Rd • Ext 23 & Ext 6 7. SATELITE LIBRARY o Behind Tshwelopele Clinic Ext 5 8. STREET LITTER BINS • Lefokotsane Rd Ext 30 • RED Square & Thekwane Ext 5

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• Hatting Drive & Mokgako Rd Ext 1 9. TARRING • Mabunda Rd Ext 1 • Lapologa Ext 11 • Umboboyi Ext 30 10. CABBING (SITE CAP) o Mokgako Rd Ext 1 & Nombhela Rd Ext 5 11. SIDE WALKS • Mokgako Str Ext 1 • Hattigh Drive Ext 1 • Roets Drive Ext 1 • Moagi Rd Ext 1 • Dibetseo Ext 1 • Lefokotsane Ext 1 • Nombhela Between Moagi & Bierman • Thekwane Ext 5 • RED Square between Thekwane & Nombhela Rd 12. PUBLIC TRANSPORT o Metro Rail 13. PEDESTRIAN CROSSING o Phumula & Rondebuilt & N3 highway ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 45 Ward Councillor

E.L Thekiso

Needs identified 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Health and social development Garage ext 9 R.T.C.W Boksburg Finaalspan Storm water drainage Health and social Family skills centre Electricity Lights in Masianoke Street between ext 4 and 9 (which is also main Street) LED Industrial Hives Paving the area were people are doing selling / putting decent stalls SRAC Upgrading of informal soccer fields SRAC Upgrading of metro parks and regular cleaning of those parks Solid Waste Suooly of 85 LT/240 LT sheet litter bins Municipal Infrastructure Waiste upgrading of outfall sewerage RTCW Paving of side walks Masiaoke Street, Khoza Street, Kgosana, Mabaso and Samsekoati Putting calming measures on new road Building a hospice within reach of Khathorus area Regular service of high mast lights Nguni hostel redevelopment to family units RTCW Nguni hostel installation of protected prepaid electricity meters. Nguni hostel installation of protected prepaid water meters Housing - fast moving of housing list and allocation of Somalia squatter camp

______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 46 Ward Councillor

S.N Nciza

Needs identified

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1. CRIME • Social crime prevention • Rapes happen on local taxis • House breaking • Robberies from Moagi next to tavern and stadium • Transport for children to school from ext 28, irrespective of the distance • Robbery at Rest in Peace Street up to old cemetery • Information box to be placed at Metro police office precinct • Drugs in the community and school • High mast lights • Cutting weeds • Street lighting e.g. Zathu Street and more 2. ROADS • Traffic calming • Pedestrian paving • Robots at butchery e.g. Moagi & Sithohimela Street • Robots - Khokhonoka Street • Maintenance of road markings e.g. stop signs, notice of humps, potholes • Immediate attention to potholes • School patrol at Manaka Street and Sithohimela • Street that joins ext 4 and Mabuya Street for a T-junction • Street to be constructed, new roads at cnr Makgalemele and Moagi Streets 3. STORM WATER DRAINING • Construct new, and maintain old, drains 4. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TOURISM • Poverty alleviation • Employment • Incubator for SMME development • Assistance for projects presented to department in 2002 e.g. bakery, chemical manufacturing,etc 5. ENVIRONMENT • Noise pollution • Cleaning of open spaces • Illegal dumping • Long grass cutting - social hazard • Rehabilitation of parks • Planting of trees in township • Establishment of playing fields for kids where they are already playing i.e. ploughing and maintenance of grass • Mobile library • Maintenance of parks through municipal service partnership (ward 46 community) • Sports facilities for all sporting codes • Expansion of parks 6. SRAC • Sewerage maintenance • Construction of new library

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• • • • • • • •

Rehabilitation Multi purpose centre One stop public service centre Mobile library (short term) All sporting codes facilities Expansion of parks Maintenance of parks through municipal service partnership between the municipality and ward 46 community Maintenance of Civic Centre

7. TRANSPORT • Rail transport from Kwesini to Mapleton via Vosloorus • One transport between Vosloorus and Thokoza via Katlehong • Buses for public transport 8. SOCIAL SERVICES (HIV & AIDS) • Fast track family social development centre for all target groups • Food nutrition • Awareness campaign • Soup kitchen • Poorly process of application forms • Safety of the aged • Training of aged on HIV & AIDS • Family centres • Development of women and children as well as parents’ and children’s projects for this year and next year • Development of people living with disability, youth, aged and men • Prevention of teenage pregnancy • Prevention of suicide and all forms of violence • Need for community empowerment so that community can separate truth from lies • House for HIV & AIDS, soup kitchen etc. from the Nguni section, two rooms. 9. HOUSING 10. EDUCATION • Special programme to uplift the standard of education at Vosloorus Comprehensive School ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 47 Ward Councillor

M.H. Siboza

Needs identified 1. Multi-purpose hall/centre • meetings are held in open spaces • this will accommodate a clinic, hall and other ward activities 2. Clinic services • these need to be provided through a mobile clinic 3. Housing • waiting list needs to be attended to • Vumbuka informal settlement needs to be developed 4. Hostel development

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the socio-economic and structural surveys were conducted for all hostels, there is a need to follow up on the actual development 5. High mast lights • two high mast lights are needed in Inyoni and Isikebhe Streets in Namibia 6. Maintenance of parks and open spaces • these need urgent attention 7. Tarring of Streets and storm water management • Dindela(near sotho flats): Pheto, Phinzi, Pooe, Palisa, Phehla, Pheto, • Mabuya Park: Maphela, Seemi and Selema/Molokomme • Extension 28:Jwaneng,Tsau,Sehitwa,Moremi,Lobatse,Sefophe,Gaborone, Tshabong,Serowe,Mauno,Shakawe,Botswana ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 48 Ward Councillor

F Mahloma

Needs identified 1. ROADS • Ratlokgo Street next to Phumelela School • Nkati, Protea, Lebenya, Silailai, Mrarabi, Kgomotsu, Mtseki, Bohopa, Ramolau and Street between Mokoena and Mnisi. 2. STREET LIGHTS • To complete Sontonga, Sekwane, Thapelo, Mosewu and Street that separates Mokoena and Mnisi 3. WATER AND SEWER UP-GRADE • During the upgrading of water meters in Katlehong, the area of Ramokunopi East was left behind so it need water meters in all stands • It is the same at Mofokeng, where there are no meters and a sewer network is also needed 4. SPORT FIELD Upgrade the sport field at Mofokeng 5. HOUSING To proclaim Molileki ext-4 as a township 6. POVERTY ALLIEVATION ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 49 Ward Councillor

A. V Moshia

Needs identified 1. ROADS • HLAHATSI SECTION o Ramaboa Street from Nota Street to new houses o Monareng Street from rail line to Mosoeu Street o Tladi Street from Tlape to Konyana Street o Seinoli Street from Tladi to Tlape Street •

PHOOKO SECTION o Tsamela Street from Sontonga road to Poole Street o Sibi Street from Monometsi Street to Poole Street o Motsepe Street from Thubela Street to Tsamela

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o

Maja Street from Mopeli section to Thubela Street



PHAKE SECTION o Pitso Street, all ward backlog o Letsie Street o Ntseare Street o Masangane Street from Hlahatsi to Phake section



MOPELI SECTION o Sibisi Street from Mosoeu to Poole Street o Makoloahe Street from Mathe Street to Sibisi o Seleke Street from Mathe Street to Sibisi o Mosole Street from Mathe Street to Sibisi



TSOLO SECTION o Tlape Street from Konyana Street to Bohopa o Khwatlake Street o Street behind Tlape o Nkotoane Street (Backlog) o Selola Street (Backlog)



GOBA SECTION - Mathetmele from Masakhane road to Rametheng Street



GOBA AND NCEMA SECTION o Hlathi Street from Mathemele in Goba to Manzinise o Ramethene Street from Mathemele in Goba to Manzinise



MAKULA SECTION-Mofokeng Street from Mathe Street to Sithole Street



WALKWAYS o Hospital Road from Sontonga Road to Mosoe Street o Mosoeu Street from Thutong Street to Sibisi Street o Sontonga road from Hospital to Moreki Street o Thutong from Mosoeu to Sontonga road



Horseshoe shapes in Phooko section facing the following Streets to be sealed with paving bricks: Konyana Street, Sibi Street,Tsamela Street and Poole Street All horseshoe shapes in Tsolo section facing Bohopa and Senong Street to be sealed with paving bricks



2. STORM WATER DRAINAGE PROBLEM • Nota Street opposite Tshabalala Primary School • Opposite stand no 146 to 148 Sontonga road - houses flooded • Opposite stand no 474 to 478 Monometsi Street Phooko section • Corner Konyana & Sontonga roads • Poole Street from Sibisi Street to Thutong in ward 48 • Corner Bakoena and Tlau Streets Phake section 3. DEVELOPMENT SPORTS, RECREATION, ARTS AND CULTURE •

Replacement of sports facilities. Relocated from erf no 1, Hlahatsi section, to a community-proposed urgent municipal land in Phake section, between the following Streets: Mphuthi, Bakoena and Tlali ( tennis court, Netball and basketball)

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• •

The old closed landfill site to be rezoned to a sports complex and to cater for the following sporting codes: soccer, rugby, softball & cricket. Upgrading of Tsolo to a world class facility

______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 50 Ward Councillor

E Ndima

Needs identified 1. ELECTRICITY •

• • •

CREDI SECTION o 322Thokoza Primary School 321 and 349 – master lights inside water tower should please be of good quality, inside the school please link with Department of Education. o From 183 Church 348 to corner 311, Street lights very urgent. Mugging. Crime rate very high in the dark at Msizi Street. SKHOSANA SECTION - Hospital road – very busy tertiary road from stand or corner 615-593. MOTSAMAI SECTION - Clinic stand 261 - more lights around all 261 stands, especially around the outside of the clinic to light up for people walking from work inbetween the Kgolamoriti primary and the clinic. Crime also very high. TWALA SECTION - Street lights at Letsoho Street tertiary road from 357 – 381; mugging rate ver high.

2. ROADS URGENT • •





MONAHENG SECTION o Tsomane Street crossing over to Botomane Street. o Mangobe Street tertiary road, shops and school/churches. SKHOSANA SECTION o Majola Street tertiary road next to shops/public Park. o Julikazi Street next to Thulisa Primary school and school for mentally ill and disabled children. o An urgent road to be reconstructed – Mabona or crossing (potholes, no road at all) Maitsona Street over Monaheng/Skhosana/Twala sections – tertiary road stand from 187 – 226 Monaheng section o 113 -593 Skhosana section o 140 -591 Twala section MOTSAMAI SECTION -Sibisi Street – Church/crossing to rail way station o Masauldane Street o Rambisa Street o Thamane Street o Noname – from 525 – 530 & 531 – 536 o Reconstruction - Noname house no. 406 – 425 MOSHOESHOE SECTION o Noname from 200 – 239 tertiary school. o Reconstruction - Tshabalala Street from stand no 2 – 465 Moshoshoe. o Tertiary – shops and Industrial. o Mofokeng Street

3. ROADS •

• •

CREDI SECTION o Gugushe Street o Masiteng Street o Ntomo Street o Chaka Street Request for tertiary road from Credi section to no. 361 Twala also 257 – 227 Monaheng. Dump rock to be placed inbetween trees planted.

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TWALA SECTION o Ginda Street o Nkosi Street – opposite park o Ngwenya Street

4. STORM WATER DRAINAGE – URGENTLY REQUIRED •











MOTSAMAI SECTION o 261 at corner Maphike Motsamai clinic, storm water drainage required to prevent floods o 367 – 336 corner Machike tertiary shops - floods. o House no. 461 – 480 storm water drainage required, floods affecting houses at Thamane Street and Noname Street (big one, please!). o House no. 337 – 340 and 336 – 332, affected by floods. o House no. 422 – 419. CREDI SECTION o Ville Street Skhosana/Credi/Twala. o Msizi Street stands 183 – 348 o 254 298 Gugushe Street o 1 18 Letsoho Street o 231 Masiteng Street MONAHENG SECTION – NEXT TO DUKATHOLE PRIMARY o Tsomane Street - floods always affect houses no. 235 and 234 o Corner 227 Monaheng and 32 Moshoeshoe, always flooded when it rains. Storm water drainage also required for stand 203 251 SKHOSANA SECTION (STORM WATER DRAINAGE) o Ngibi Street – 274 – 333 / 282 284 o Mathabela – 271 – 273 o Jilikazi Street – stand 497 o Ville Street as a whole o Stand no. 93 o Stand no. 162 – 164 o Stand no. 364 – 619 - Mentally Disabled School. MOSHOESHOE SECTION o Stand no. 483 – 433 o Stand no. 239 – 240 Noname Street o Stand no. 224 – 255 o Stand no. 165 – 255 Mofokeng Street o Stand no. 567 Moshoeshoe Twayi Street o Stand no. 552 Moshoeshoe Twayi Street o Stand no. 524 Moshoeshoe Tsilo Street TWALA SECTION o Corner stand 500 and 473 Ginya Street o Corner stands 55 and 423 Nkosi o Corner stand 310 and 1042 Zithumane Street o Corner 566 – 117 Khumalo Street

5. SIDE WALKS • •

MOTSAMAI SECTION o 568 – 261 Motsamai clinic Moreki Street o Stand 406 – 425 Noname MOSHOESHOE SECTION

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• •

o Stand no 11 – 450 Potse Street o Stand 1 Credi 485 Moshoeshoe section Tshabalala o Morena Street o Lerutle Street o Stand no. 24 – 422 Moshoeshoe Noname o Manamela Street MONAHENG SECTION o Mogojo Street 1 – 20 o Sewe Street o Mabizela Street SKHOSANA SECTION o Ville Street o Majola Street o Sibisi Street o Hospital Road o Simelane Street o Masemula Street o Botomane Road TWALA SECTION o Ville Street, Ginya Street, Kuluse Street, Letsoho Street – tertiary road, Mabona Street – tertiary road & Khumalo Street – tertiary road CREDI SECTION -Letsoho road from 17 – 164 Credi & Mzizi Street

6. BUILDING OF HOSPICE As identified on IDP - Stand 241 hospice requested. _____________________________________________________________________________ WARD 51 Ward Councillor

S Dlomo

Needs identified 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Side walk paving at Maleke Street (starting from Kgotso to Lamula Streets) Installation of Street lights at Motheo Street. 2 High mast lights at Hlahane. Construction of storm water drainage and side walk at Monde drive. Construction of storm water drainage and side walk at Hlatswayo Street. Construction of Ramatlo and Madia - currently under construction (construction of storm water drainage must also be done for both Streets.) Construction of Nyovane Streets with storm water drainage. Construction of Puditswana Street with with storm water drainage. Construction of Mdakane Street with storm water drainage. Construction of Tshabalala Street with storm water drainage. Construction of Marutle Street with storm water drainage. Construction of Phetheni Street with storm water drainage. Construction of Gumede Street with storm water drainage. Construction of Nkabinde Street with storm water drainage. Construction of Nkabinde Street with storm water drainage. Construction of road 24 (Hlahane section) Construction of Baduza Street with storm water drainage Construction of Zwane Street with storm water drainage Construction of Zulu Street with storm water drainage Construction of Moloto Street with storm water drainage

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21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

Construction of Madonsela Street with storm water drainage and side walks. Construction of Shai Street with storm water drainage and side walks Construction of Makuba Street with storm water drainage Construction of Lamula Street with side walks Construction of Maphisa Street with storm water drainage Construction of Maitso Street with storm water drainage Construction of Moabi Street between Tshabangu and Marutle with storm water drainage Construction of Mabena Street between Pheleni and Tshabalala with storm water drainage Construction of Madlala Street with side walks Construction of Flatela Street with side walks Construction of Park between Lamola and Motheo Street Construction of Park between Mapitso and Hlatshwayo Street Area at Old Beer Hall be developed to be youth development centre Building of Tamaho clinic. The existing storm water drainage needs regular maintenance especially during rainy period. Note that due to the fact that ward 51 is mainly at the low part of the township, most of our Streets need to be constructed with storm water drainage to alleviate the problem of floods during rainy period. 37. Side walks be constructed, especially on Streets leading to schools, shops and churches. _____________________________________________________________________________ WARD 52 Ward Councillor

C L Nkosi

Needs identified 1. INFRASTRUCTURE SERVICES •

RT&CW o Tarring of 13 Streets, stormwater and sidewalks. Total 4.4 kilometers

Mpilisweni Section, Tokoza o ZIKODE STREET=0.8KM o ZULU STREET=0.2KM o MPHETHA STREET=0.2KM o MLOTSHWA STREET=0.2KM o SISULU STREET=0.2KM o MADLALA STREET=0.2KM o GABELA STREET=0.2KM o MKHIZE STREET = 0.2KM Equals 2.2KM Maphanga Section, Katlehong. o MADLALA STREET = 1KM o MASHABA STREET=0.4KM o MABIZELA STREET=0.4KM o NHLEKO STREET=0.2KM o MASEKO STREET= 0.2KM Equals 2.2KM • • •

New and upgrading of stormwater drainage at Serema Street,Mpilisweni,Thokoza Paving of all sidewalks at Maphanga Section and Nadunstria X1, Katlehong, to prevent dolomite. Concretising of the Stormwater canal.

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• •

Development of Taxi Rank at Khumalo Street,Thokoza Development of Taxi intermodel Rank, next to Natalspruit Hospital,Katlehong



Electricity o Installation of protective structures on all Streets. o Installation of pre-paid inside the protective structures. (Remove pre-paid from the houses). o Upgrading of mini-substation to carry winter demand. o Installation of Pre-Paid (protective structure) at Tokoza Hostel 1,2and 3. o Build dispensary (electricians, technician and engineers) from Tokoza CCC, to act fast to power failures.

2. SRAC • Provision of a library at Tokoza CCC • Building of tennis and netball court at 236 and 237 Mhlambi Street, Maphanga Section, Katlehong. 3. COMMUNITY SAFETY • Provision for EMPD office at Tokoza CCC. • Extend Emergence Services at Tokoza CCC to store more vehicle and staff. • Provision for licensing office at Tokoza CCC. 4. HEALTH • Convert portion of land at Natalspruit Hospital to formal Clinic. • Provision of dry toilet at Mandela and Mpilisweni informal settlement. 5. HOUSING • Development of hostel 1, 2 and 3 at Tokoza. • Re-allocation of informal settlement at Mpilisweni Section, Tokoza and Mandela Section, Katlehong. • Re-allocation of affected houses at Maphanga Section, Katlehong due to dolomite. 6. ENVIRONMENT • Provision of palisade fencing to stop nonsense at quarry dam, Nadunstria X1, Katlehong. • Provide concrete chairs and tables to all identified parks and one general, and work to maintain. 7. CORPORATE SERVICES • Provide corporate and legal office at Tokoza CCC. • Provide all Street light poles with Ekurhuleni name and Corporate Logo as a brand name and market the Metro. • Capacitate Tokoza CCC/MPCC with all relevant government departments. • Name all no-name Streets (13 Streets) 8. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT • Provide stalls to all informal traders, and register them. 9. CITY DEVELOPMENT • Provide fencing (wire) to all RDP housing at Mandela Section and clearly demarcate one yard from another. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 53 Ward Councillor

W.J. JARVIS

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Needs identified 1. Provision of housing and land, and land for private housing development 2. Sports and recreational facilities for Thinasonke, Brackendowns, Mayberry Park and Albertsdal. 3. Multipurpose recreation centre and swimming pool 4. Traffic lights at J.G. Strydom and Kliprivier intersection. (this need has become very urgent) 5. More Schools (Secondary and primary) 6. Expansion of Clinics 7. Expansion of library 8. Centre for the disabled and aged 9. Safety and Security and traffic calming measures (speed breakers) 10. Sidewalk paving for De Waal, Andries Abraham, Ferrari, Lancia, Pieterson Wynkwaardt Streets 11. Air conditioning for the two halls 12. All Streets affected by drainage system ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 54 Ward Councillor

N Mabuza

Needs identified 1. ROADS • Twala section- storm water at Mabona Street • Mavimbela sectiom - storm water and pavement at Embooi Street • Twala section - storm water and pavement at Gonya Street • Mavimbela section - storm water and pavement at Khosa Street • A road to Thembalethu (Magubane Primary school) tarred, storm water and paving • Ncala section - storm water and pavement at Mtshali Street • Storm water and pavement at Magoquaa Street • Storm water and pavement at Daylights Street • Storm water, pavement and tarring at Dhlamini Street 2. Storm water management • Serana corner Moloi and Khumalo at Tokoza • Kubheka Street at Phenduka-Tokoza • Matsilwane Street at Tokoza • Pitso Street at Tokoza • Mabona Street at Twala section -Katlehong • Mhlongo Street at Ntamba Ntsimbi at Tokoza • Mjivani Street at Ntaba Ntsimbi -Tokoza • Khunjwayo Street Tintwa Village -Tokoza 3. Poverty Alleviation. Most of the people who are residing in this ward (60%) are unemployed. They need skills and job opportunities. 4. Sports facilities • There are grounds which can be utilised. We are requesting sports facilties to be cleaned and one to be upgraded. These grounds are at Mavimbela sports ground next to Ntuthuko primary school at Twala next to Mkhathizwe at Tokoza. 5. Visible policing • Deployment of Metro police in the area • Revival of SAPS sector policing forums

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• Education awareness about effects of crime on the community 6. Sewer • Tshabalala Street needs to be upgraded - sewer • Nkaki at Tokoza • Gomede Street -Tokoza 7. Public transport • More Metro buses - accommodate disabled people • Street lights • Kgotso Street • Maitiwe Street • Grass cutting - all open spaces and school • Environment and health ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 55 Ward Councillor

E. Masilo

Needs identified 1. Tarring of roads/Streets • Roads storm water drainage system maintenance at Maskhane road between Zuma and Mavimbela sections and around Katlehong Technical School at Radebe Memorial Park. 2. Grass cutting at the parks, especially at railway line 3. Waste removal - Waste to be collected twice a week 4. Recreational and sports facilities at Radebe ground 5. Building of new houses in all empty spaces allocated for churches 6. Building of skills development Centre at Radebe Section at site next to memorial stone between Nota and Matlango Streets 7. Building of multipurpose community centre at Goba section opposite Clinic or pilot railway station 8. Poverty alleviation programme should be introduced for the community which should include distribution of food parcels and agricultural activities 9. Building of industrial hives at Sali Section next to Nokulunga school or opposite Twili Street 10. Crime – Police to be deployed in a way that they are visible at all times in all areas - especially at dawn and night. Also civillian oversight committee should be established and empowered to promote community policing concept. 11. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Sali Section – Inqunqu, Twili, Sanqela & Msitumpela str 12. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Radebe Section - Mdluli Str. Mlingumhle; DUbulindanga Str; Mazwi; Mlangeni; Nota Str; Matlango & Waythi 13. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Hlongwane Section - Pasela str; Gele Str; Dube Str; Msimango Str; Mbasane Str; Mbatha Str & Mhacamba Str 14. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Goba Section - Hlathi Str, Mavuso Str & Sukazi Str 15. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Ncala Section - Kubeka Str, Vile Str, Mtambo Str, Ganya Str, Fakuda Str & Noverian Str 16. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Mavimbela Section - Mbooi Str, Mtshabi Str, Gakhamba Str & Lehlongwane Str 17. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Zuma Section - Madida Str, Maphakama Str, Mzimba Str, Moya Str & Xhengwana Str 18. Gravel Roads to be tarred at Ndlanzi Section - Blom Str; Gantsho Str; Qika Str; Maseko Str; Lekgata Str & Kweya Str ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 56 Ward Councillor

K Msibi

Needs identified 1. Roads and storm water drainage • Mabuya Street next to Retention dam - Houses are sinking • Corner Sekonyela and Pitso Streets - Storm water problem is not yet solved • Tobatse-Tshele and Maphale Streets- Storm water problem not solved either • Khumalo Street - to Angus station - Opposite Sam Ntuli stadium and indoor centre - storm water is needed. • Maintenance of corner Ntuli and Zondo Streets - storm water drainage, as it can’t take running water on this road any more • Storm water problem on corner Nkau and Tshabalala Streets 2. Pavement of circles and sidewalks • Khumalo road has been paved with a few sidewalks outstanding • Circles in the following Streets are not yet paved: Xaba Street and Mabuya Street • Sidewalks in particularly busy Streets, like Mabuya Street where there are schools and shops, Sekonyela Street with shops, church and a taxi rank nearby, and Xaba Street with shops and a busy road / Street for the learners. • Development of Steenpunt -This area is a priority as crime is continuous. Currently it is used as a place to rape women • Provision of sport facilities - the neglected soccer grounds in Nyaki-Tshabalala and Mjivane need to be upgraded • Electric high masts need to be maintained, in particular Nkaki-Khumalo and Mokoena roads. Mabuya should also be part of the maintenance process. ___________________________________________________________________________________ Ward 57 Councillor:

T. Nketle

Needs identified 1.

Storm water drainage • Ext 1 (Othandweni) a. Cnr Elangeni street & Tumelo crescent 2. Cnr Elangeni & Mohale crescent Amanzi Mtoti crescent 3. 4. Botodi crescent • Drainage ext 2 5. Cnr Lerole & Setsokotsane street Tladi & Zitha street 6. 7. Cnr Mahano & Mapetane verganoeg 8. Cnr Moepshwe between Chapatso & Shilakoe • Phola Park 9. The whole area needs storm water drainage 10. Clearing of storm water drains 11. Cnr Modumo & Hlabula

2. Tarring of streets • Ext 1 Mhluzi street 12.

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• •

13.

Thirela

Ext 2 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Unit F 20. Phola Park 21.

Tladi + Zitha street Nong & Motsamai & Motswenyane Umtwalone, Mavuso, Mdlalose, Mokeba & Ndlovu Ntake & Matakalatse Gibson, Gumsi, Ntsala, Dihere and Meals streets Cubes, Theko and Nakedi Madwaleni,Mosa & Kagiso street Ubonda street, Fix street, Esywa street, Egolide street and Ithusi street

3. Electricity • High masts lights 22. Mcuse, Theko and Nakedi 4. Street humps • Ext 2 23. 24. • Unit f 25. 26.

Cnr. Setsokotsane and Lenong Cnr Morubisi and Nakedi Bhejane and Langa both right and left side Bhejane and Khotso

5. Water and sanitation • Phola park informal settlement 6. Parks and Infrastructure Services (SRAC) • Meriting park stand no. 7878 Mutumisi and Tshotetsi Street. • Fencing and paving along side walk at no.3228 Yende and Mokgwara Street. • Phola park grounds need fencing and grass cutting 7. Health and Social development • The stand behind stand no. 8679 (Grinaker) Tshepo street needs fencing for poverty alleviation project for women for recycling in particular • Day care center for vulnerable children in Phola Park for ward 57 8. Housing • Housing reallocation of Phola Park informal settlement

___________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 58 Ward Councillor

G M Beta

Needs identified 1. Street naming in Thokoza extension 5 and Kwenele and Palmridge 2. Upgrading and tarring of Street in Thokoza extension 5, 2, Kwenele & Palm ext 4 3. Lack of community centres in between Thokoza extension 5 and extension 2

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

Illegal electricity connections Illegal occupation of houses Extension of clinic and library in Palm Ridge Land for graveyard / cemetery Land for agricultural purposes Paving of roads and passages between houses in Phola Park extension 5, Kwenele & hostels, Nqubela primary school, Thabontsako secondary school, Palmridge secondary school and Mohlodi primary school Speed humps in Thokoza extension 2, Palmridge proper and Palmridge ext 4 Rehabilitation of dolomitic land in Sakhile informal settlement Informal traders Building of school in Kwenele Electricity in Palmridge extension 4, Sakhile High mast lights in Palmridge extension 4, Sakhile informal settlement, Phola Park clinic and ext 2 Extension of water pipe in Sakhile informal settlement Extension of electricity sub-station in Palmridge Rehabilitation of sewer system in Schoeman graveyard/cemetery and Palmridge ext 4 Storm water in Kwenele, Thokoza extension 2, Phola park extension 5 and Palmridge ext 4 Ablution facilities in Palmridge shopping centre Extension of railway line from Angus to Phola Park, Eden park and Palmridge Upgrading of playing grounds in Palm ext 4, Thokoza ext 2 & 5, Kwenele and Mohlodi School Ablution facilities in Sakhile informal settlement Construction of road from Phola Park clinic to K 146 and installation of robot Rehabilitation of water tower in Palmridge as it it is not functional

______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 59 Ward Councillor

J Ndebele

Needs identified 1. Ramokonopi West (Next to Ramokonopi Clinic) Streets need to be constructed: • Erf 338 to 363, Erf 385 to 405, Erf 431 to 452, Erf 364 to 499, Erf 470 to 483. Passage between Erf 223 and 222 Sontonga Street needs to be paved.Waiting room to be constructed at Ramokonopi clinic 2. Ramokonopi West (Next to Ramokonopi Police Station) • Erf 597 to 581, Erf 563 to 794, Erf 745 to 762, Erf 708 to 727 & Erf 667 to 688 3. Ramokonopi West (Behind Ramokonopi Police Station) • Erf 160, Erf 245 to 305 & Erf 197 to 2/819 4. Ramokonopi West (Next to Mosako Street Bridge) • Erf 61 to 17, Erf 16 to 130 & Erf 104 to 116 5. Monise Section. Streets need to be constructed: • Maphosa Street, Letaka Street, passage between erf 379 to 380 Letaka Street to be paved, passage between 143, 144, 174 and 178 Moshia Street to be paved, circle in Tsoeu Qhamaki Streets to be paved & Nonyana Street erf 15 26. 6. Likole Section (Next to ZCC Church) - Streets to be constructed Erf 77 to 92 & Erf 765 to 777 7. Likole ext 2 (next to Kwa-Mazibiko Hostel) - all Streets need to be constructed. 8. Kwa-Mazibiko - Hostel to be re-constructed. 9. Multi-Purpose Centre to be constructed (build) 10. Likole ext 1 (next to Lungisani Primary school) Streets to be constructed: • Erf 2020 to 2097 • Erf 2001 to 2057 • Erf 2079 to 2098

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• Erf 2143 to 2104 11. Likole ext (two rooms) Streets to be constructe:d Erf 702249 to 192249 & Erf 702249 to 492249 12. SIDE WALKS: • Sontonga Street • Erf 96 to 73/2249 • Monise section - Erf 579 • Likole section – Erf 903 • Ramokonopi West – Erf 338 to 794 • Likole section – Erf 927 to 3540 13. STORM WATER DRAINAGE • Ramokonopi – Erf 363, Erf 384, Erf 431 & Erf 364 • Likole ext 1- Pabatso Street, Phenduka Street, Phumula Street & Ponego Street _____________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 60 Ward Councillor

J Thaba

Needs identified 1. Roads • Ramokopi East o Street between house no 719-339 o Street between house no 458-322 o Street between house no 370-397 o Street between house no 476-486 • Khumalo Valley o Mkhari Street o Maja Street o Mbambela Street o Ntema Street • Likole ext 1 o Mshiyeni Street o Ngabeko Street o Matie Street o Thabo Street ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 61 Ward Councillor

M.H. Nkabi

Needs identified 1. Electrification 2. Roads & Storm Water 3. Bridge from Zonkizizwe to Umngandane 4. Speed humps 5. Old age home 6. Youth centre 7. Grass cutting 8. High mast lights 9. Primary and secondary schools 10. Taxi ranks 11. Trauma centre and police station 18. Clinic in Palmridge ext. 7 ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 62 Ward Councillor

G Sibeko

Needs identified 1. High Mast light - All areas of the ward 2. Maintenance of existing Street lights & construct new ones - All areas of the ward where there are Streets lights and where there are no lights 3. Roads to be constructed on all Streets with storm water pipes and paving. All Streets of the ward – Magagula, Zonke proper, Zonke ext 1,2,3&6

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4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Street names - All Streets of the ward Household electricity - For Zonkizizwe Ext 3 & 6 Infrastructure and sanitation - Zone 4 and other parts of Zonkizizwe Sanitation for informal settlement or re-allocation - Enkanini stands number 4483 and 4464 New houses to be build - Zonkizizwe ext 3, 6, 4 & 5 Magagula Heights Sports facilities - Magagula and Zonke zone 5, stand no. 6420 Upgrading & maintenance of existing sport facility - Zonkizizwe next to the old municipal offices Maintenance of Parks - Zonkizizwe next to the office & Sunrise parks. Staffing of all clinics to enable the Sunrise clinic to operate - Zonkizizwe ext 2, Zonke clinic 1&2 Transport – buses or any other means of transport available -to operate in all areas of the ward. Emergency services - Next to Zonkizizwe police station. Filling or fencing of sinkholes/dongas - Zonkizizwe ext 6. Digging of gravels on erfs - Zonkizizwe ext 6. Palisade fence around the river - Zonkizizwe ext 6 Unfolding of Magagula heights title deeds - Magagula Heights

___________________________________________________________________________ WARD 63 Ward Councillor

MA Thibedi

Needs identified 1. The building of Library at Vosloorus Ext 20 2. 30 high mast lights: Vosloorus ext 20, Katlehong South, Moleleki ext 2 & 3 3. Construction of Multipurpose Sports Complex and Soccer field at 2192 Katlehong South 4. Construction of the Venus drive which has no storm water pipes for 2km 5. Construction of the tertiary roads Mzwandile, mesa in Vosloorus ext 20 Makhutha and Maphanga ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 64 Ward Councillor

F P BOOI

Needs identified 1. STREETS TO BE CONSTRUCTED - EXTENSION 28 • Abuja, Amboiwa, Bamako, Chamangala, Chibia, Chibuto, Chirundi, Conda, Congo, Dowa, Epukiro, Gabela, Galangue, Goma, Gwayi, Indungo, Kalinku, Kasane, Kasunga, Kinshasa, Kunene, Liberia, Linchanga, Lubango; Lundazi, Lupiri, Mabalane, Mafeteng, Magude, Malemba, Maloti, Munzini, Matatiele, Matobo, Matsapa, Maua, Mbizi, Megarume, Mnantulo, Mnolo, Moma, Mpandematenga, Mwaya, Mumbondo, Mzuzu, Naburi, Nairobi, Namapa, Namibe, Namuno, Namutoni, Ndola, Nsanje, Ombhalantu, Ondjwa, Quichinje, Samoco, Sengwa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zomba, Burindi, Chipuku, Chikwawa, Karonga, Chitipa, Rumphi, Bambe, Mangwa, Bibala, Bailundo, Chitembo, Chama, Quichinje, Oshokati Street. 2. LIST OF VACANT SITES /OPEN SPACES AROUND EXT 28, 14 & 25 • Phase 7 1/20916, 99/20916 & RE/20916 • Phase 2 172/209111, 20928 & 20951 • Phase 1 20926, 20917, 20944, 20945, 20946, 20947, 250, 171 & 249 • Phase 3 20932, 20933, 20935, 20936, 20938, 20939, 20940, 49/20941, 20942, 20956, 20957, 20958 & 20955 • Phase 4/5 27/20923, 20954, 267/21678, 16/20922, 20921, 146 & 147 • Extension 14 11138, 11531, 11800, 11801, 11799, 12059, 12058, 11835, 11836 & 12104

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• Extension 25 18235 & 18236 ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 65 Ward Councillor

N. G. Baleka

Needs identified Housing • Ext 10. o The whole area needs houses o About 500 stands on the West do not have toilets o Six stands to be re-allocated or rezoned or be put migration plan, as they are on church sites from no. A-F • Ext 30. o Some of the houses are incomplete and about 400 need to be built • Ext 31. o More houses need to be built in this area. • Ext 18 &19 o Need more houses, these townships need to be proclaimed Roads and maintenance • Ext 10. Roads are needed in the following Streets: Zwane, Limako, Phethu, Maimela, Sikele, Sawule, Moshe, Mbatha, Masondo, Nzimande, Sangweni, Moeketsi, Mbathane, Zondo and Jacob Zuma Streets. • Ext 19. Thembelihle and Nkuna roads • Ext 36. Mqumelo, Kumbe, Mbikwana, Gambia and Sam Ntuli Street High masts • High masts to be erected, ext 7 and ext 36 Storm water drainages • These are needed at Sithole Drive, Masondo Street, Motha Street, Rueben Street and Mqalo Street in Ext 10. Other priorities • Multi purpose centre • Old age home • Stadium and parks • Shopping centre • Agricultural projects • Projects (job creation) • Taxi rank ext 36 ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 66 Ward Councillor

P Nkunjana

Needs identified 1. Storm water drainage • Madikizela road (bend) • Ext. 9 phase 2 Enkwarini • Mandela ext 24 • Next to Zamukhanyo primary school • Kgolagano primary school 2. Roads Construction • Reconstruction Madikizela road (bend)

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3.

4.

5. 7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

• Next to ambulance centre office • 26th and 28th Street • Near Roller Street ext 9 • Magalela, sekgala ext 9 • Dabula, Simunye & Malata ext 9 • Tembalihle & Turtle Dove • Third Street ext 24 & Bhila & Velile ext 8 • Zibi Street, Loliwe ext 8 • Dallas & Thabethe ext 24 • Gwebu & Ngwenya ext 21 • Mbhele Street Paving side walks • Madikizela road • Chris Hani drive • Building bridge 23rd Street Recreational facilities • Sports field facilities ground stands Chris Hani • Community park ext 24 • Planting of trees, main Street Eiselen • Msane drive and Madikizela road • Changing of names - ext 9 to be given new names • Development of park near Tshepo Themba hall • Recreational park Dan Pharasi P.S Speed humps • Bul Bul Street Manufacturing advice centre & local business support centre • Hawkers trade at Las Vegas & next to Chamase Shop • Ententeni trade hawkers • Construction of co-operative sites next to Stompi Skosana • Justice centre • Post office • Old age home (Hospice) • Home affairs • Orphanage and community centre ext 9 • Eskom information centre • Disabled persons home ext 9 Traffic calming measures • Las Vegas (Eiselen Street) • Chris Hani drive • Madikizela road Potholes • Madikizela road • Eiselen road RDP Houses to be built • Extension 9 • Extension 19 • Extended fire station Poverty Alleviation • Farming, waste management, soup kitchen, sewing projects, co-operatives and manufacturing are projects needed to alleviate poverty.

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______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 67 Ward Councillor

M.S Rapolile

Needs identified Ext 3, Ext 2, Quantum and Bester • Street lights • Upgrade storm water drainage • Street naming • Recreational facilities and soccer playing grounds to be graded • Paving of passages • Traffic lights to be installed at corner Essellen and Koppie Motebang Street (next to Caltex garage) Extension 5 Barcelona • Tarring of Madibeng Street • Street lights • Two passages to be paved • Street naming • Storm water drainage to be constructed Etwatwa West • Urgent tarring of Streets for this communit y- Ntsoana Streets around BB Myathaza • Streets lights at Koppie Motebang road • Upgrading of Joy Clinic • Storm water drainage to be constructed, especially around BB Myathaza • Immediate maintenance of the water bridge/tunnel that takes water from this area to Bless Bok Sprier (Wet lands) • Soccer playing grounds to be graded • Building of RDP Houses • Informal settlement next to Etwatwa police to be zoned for residential & RDP Houses to be built Ext 24, Lucky Gardens Mandela section- Etwatwa East (within the jurisdiction of ward 67) • Tarring of roads • Street naming • Street lights • Recreational facilities • Soccer playing grounds to be graded • Finalise unfinished RDP Houses Slovo Park, Walegdaht and Jacobs farm • Tarring of roads Libiya Street • Pedestrian Bridge be erected at Provincial road that cut across Slovo Park • Building of clinic • Ward council office for consultations and meetings • Street lights Common needs for the whole ward • Community hall • Clinic • Erection of pedestrian bridge between Etwatwa West and Etwatwa East rail line • Electrical Power Station to be upgraded

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• • • • • • • • •

Fencing of wet lands from Etwatwa to Springs Slovo Park, it poses a danger to people Traffic lights to be installed at Caltex garage corner Essellen and Koppie Motebang Building of stalls for Street vendors Land allocation for business purposes Land allocation for church sites Recreational facilities Humps, particularly at key and busy Streets Road maintenance and visible road signs Streets that need to be a priority i. Madibane Street ext 5 ii. Ntsoana Street Etwatwa west iii. Libiya Street Slovo Park ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 68 Ward Councillor

N.K. Badela

Needs identified STREETS THAT NEED TO BE TARRED • Gasela, Gazini, Gule, Mala, Khuze, Kunene, Mdluli, Zondi, Frans Amigo Crescent, Mkhatshwa Crescent, Ephraim Mapaka Crescent, Thobejane Crescent, Thlaping, tlase, Tau, Tswanko, Mashiane, Gambu, Masango, Ndlovu, Skhukhuni, Maisela, Mphosi, Mogani, Madela, Mangosuthu, Ntshangase, Bookholoane, all Chris Hani Streets, Inama Streets and Madihlaba Streets PAVING / TAR AT PASSAGES • Tebele, Thlaping, Mashiane, Tswako, Gumbi Street Ext 3 • Passages-Gazini / Gasela and Gule / Mala Street • We need Kerbs at Gumbi Street next to graveyard STORM WATER - Most of our storm water drainage needs to be cleaned FACILITIES • Multi-purpose centre - erf no 869 • Tennis court - cnr Moss Mabona / Seiso • Park next to Bhekimfundo school • Park next to Moroka Library • We need houses at Chris Hani • We also need storm water drainage in Chris Hani • Cleaning & Upgrading of Gumbi graveyard • Speed humps at Ext 3 ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 69 Ward Councillor

E. V. Chauke

Needs identified 1. STORM WATER DRAINAGE • Kheswa and Luthuli • Kheswa Street and Turton

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• • •

Kheswa and Dushane Khutswe, Kgolokwe and Mmangwato Matsobane and Matsau

2. ROAD CONSTRUCTION • Khanyile Street • Mabaso and Mazibuko • Motanyane next to Lerutle Street • Seleka Street, Sotho Street, Sia Street & Kone Street 3. PAVING SIDEWALKS • At the back of Rivoni school next to Chris Hani • Paving of Koni passage • Paving of Thlako passage • Paving of Motanyane Street • Turton Street, sidewalks next to stadium • Mocke Street next to stadium • Eeselen and Gumbi 4. RECREATIONAL FACILITIES-Recreational Park next to Ekuzimisela 5. STREET LIGHTS • Catholic passage at Madona Street • Street light at the back of Rivoni School next to Chris Hani 6. SPEED HUMPS - Mokopane Street 7. POTHOLES • Patching of potholes at Thlako Street, Kheswa Street • Improvement of Old Age Home - Provide security • Improvement of Daveyton Street light - because we experience power failures • Housing development for local communities • Provide basic service for Chris Hani • Speed up Chris Hani housing project • Improvement of old toilet system • Move meters at the back to the front • Review free basic electricity with Eskom, more for those using conventionall meters • Community safety - Establish community intelligence • Renewal of cracking houses / falling houses at Central • Renewal / reinstallation of steet sheet / roof ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 70 Ward Councillor

S. T. Ditshego

Needs identified 1. ROADS (NEW) – Tarred roads at the following Streets - Mbonani Street fro 500m, Ntambo Street from Mpinga to Mahlobo Street, Shongwe Street from Kheswa to Zibisini Street, Mahlobo Street from Sydney Mkwalo to exes road, Nkwaketse Street from Hlakwana to Hlakwana Street, Rapulane Street from Nareng to Nareng Street &

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Kwena Street from Fokeng to Fokeng Street & Kolobe Street from Nareng to Nareng. Nxumalo Street, Dladla, Qayi, Qhudeni, Noge Street & Wabane Street 2. RESURFACING OF ROADS - Bhengu, Ndzingwa, Tshezi Street & Gcaleka Street. 3. INTERSECTION RESURFACING - Ramza & Gumede Ramza & Mahlobi, Kheswa / Dungeni 4. TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES - Ramza, Thembu, Hlakwana, Tshezi, Mocke & Vezi Street 5. STORM WATER MANAGEMENT URGENT -( Bhengu & Gcaleka Street, Kheswa & Gumede Street, Matlala, Rolong as water enters in households properties) Ramza / Ntambo Street and Mpinga Street, Rapulane Street & Tshezi Street 6. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS – Ward-based plumbing and hospice and farming by co-operatives in need of land. 7. UPGRADING OF HOSTEL & VICTOR NDLAZILWANE HALL 8. MANUFACTURING ADVICE CENTRE & LOCAL BUSINESS SUPPORT CENTRES - Information centre and Resource centre at Tshezi Street open space. 9. FACILITIES FOR DISABLED, AGED AND YOUTH CENTRE 10. METER INSTALLATION AND REM OVAL OF OLD LEAKING METERS (URGENT) - at Vezi, Wabana, Bhengu, Tolo & Tshezi, Rapulane Street, Hlakwana Street, Hurutshe, Moletlane Street, Pulane Street, Rolong Street,Phuti Street, Pedi Street, Rapulane Street, Turton Street, Lobedu Street, Nareng Street, Fokeng Street, Kwena Street, Kgatla Street, Kolobe Street, Ledwaba Street, Matlala Street, Mabena Street, Barwa & Nkwakwetse Street. 11. SAFETY & SECURITY – Ward-based Metro police operation. 12. PARKS (PROVISION & MAINTENANCE) - Development of Tourism Park at Mbonani open space. 13. SPORTS FACILITIES (UPGRADING & MAINTENANCE) - Swazi ground to be maintained, Hostel ground. 14. POVERTY ALLEVIATION - Backyard farming & sewing, Tourism Park at Mbonani Street. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 71 Ward Councillor

M.A. Kgopa

Needs identified 1. Roads • Tarred roads at the following Streets - Xhosa, Gelebe Street from Venda to Gonono, Belemu, Dotwana/Mbathane, Sibisini, Roka, Bokisi, Xesibe, Hasane, Bhele, Lemba, Cisane, Khakhu, Shongwe, Gubeni, Khangela, Mphefu, Mhlopheki, Malubane, Mavunda, Magigwane, Dumeri, DM Mthimunye 2. Resurfacing of roads - Khaku, Magigwane, Gonon, Hlomela, Sigalo, Venda, Methewson, Sinaba and Edom and Sihoko Street 3. Traffic Calming measures - Gonono next to passage, Sigalo at Marivate off ramp, Tonga Street in the middle, Sihoko next to EGCI church and Ngomane in the middle, Phaswane Street, Dungeni between Yende and ramza, Duvula in the middle 4. Economic Development Project – Ward-based plumbing & hospice by cooperatives

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5. Storm Water Management - Dungeni Street between Yende and Ramza Street, Xhosa Street and Dotwana Street 6. Manufacturing Advice Centre & Local Business Support Centres - Information centre and resource centre at Marivate youth center 7. Development of sidewalks - Sihoko, Phaswane, Heald Dungeni, Mthewson & Ngomane Streets 8. Meter installation and removal of old back yard water meters - Gonono, Gelebe, Khakhu, Phaswane to Ngomane (the whole block), Ngomane to venda ( the whole block) 9. Safety & security - Ward-based Metro police operation 10. Parks (Provision & Maintenance) - Development of park at Dotwana open space 11. Sports facilities (Upgrading & maintenance) - New ground at Yende open space. Ground to be maintained at Sigalo ground and ext 2 ground, Vista University ground. 12. Poverty alleviation - Farming, plumbing, waste management, soup kitchen & sewing project ____________________________________________________________________________ WARD 72 Ward Councillor

M J Nxumalo

Needs identified 1. Housing development and upgrading of informal housing • Gugulethu/Everest Payneville ext 3 o Housing development • Gabon o Re-allocation • Modder East Skomplass o Housing development/Re-allocation 2. Roads (new and resurfacing) and storm water management. • Slovo Park (New roads and storm water management system needed urgently) o Brazzaville Street o Kabul Street • Payneville (New roads/ reconstruction and storm water management system needed urgently) o Huddleston road o Ndamase Street o Zwelithini road o Bafanabafana Street o Tambo road o Nightcrecker o Mabhokobhoko road 3. Schools • Payneville: Two schools are needed in that area as the community grows every day. The one high school and one primary school at Bakerton area are overloaded. Lots of children are using transport to get to schools far away, some in Mpumalanga province. 4. Pedestrian facilities (paving sides walk ways) • Payneville o Ndamase Street o Zwelithini Street o Bafanabafana Street o Mabhokobhoko Street • Bakerton

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o First Street o Honey circle Other areas o Along Enstra road o Along Welgedacht road

5. Economic development and poverty alleviation • Slovo park o Recycling project o Brick-making project • Bakerton o Taxi rank informal traders shelter (Bakerton taxi rank) o African market (Utilise park between First and Second Avenue) o Car wash (next to the Bakerton taxi rank) • Others o Re- instate Zivuseni o Community-based services delivery projects (e.g. refuse removal, meter readings and others) 6. Sports and Recreational Facilities • Payneville o Soccer and netball playing fields. o Parks and playing facilities for children. 7. Safety and security • Increase policing in all our areas. In our ward crime is high. Metro Police are not visible on crime prevention. 8. Transport • There is a need for public and affordable transport in all areas e.g. Metro buses and Trains. o From Welgedacht to Springs town, train and Metro buses are needed o Connect Daveyton and Springs via Slovo and Payneville with train (there are existing facilities already) o Modder East/ Eastvale and Dersly Park Metro buses are needed 9. Street Names (In some areas there are no Street names, some are missing and need to be replaced) • Payneville o Replace missing and erect new Street names. • Bakerton o Replace missing Street names • Slovo park o Erect new Street names • Modder East/ Eastvale and Dersly Park o Replace missing Street names 10. Sewer • Replace old sewer lines in the ward. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 73

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Ward Councillor

T M Mokoena

Needs identified Refuse Removal Health Service Gravel for repairing Streets Solid waste removal Grass cut Grader Water - communal stand pipes Portion 35 of the farm Modderfontein 76 IR, where Lindelani is situated, could not be utilised to formalise the settlement _____________________________________________________________________________________ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

WARD 74 Ward Councillor

G van Wyk

Needs identified 1. Roads • Moloto Street, Mokou Str, Mokate and Morake Str • Roads markings and maintenance 2. Street Lights and High Mast Lighting • Hebedi Str - Kwa Thema Street, lights needed from Theo Twala to Joe Mzanane Drive • High Mast Lighting in Ekuthuleni needs service • Mkhwanca Informal Settlement • Old copper cable replacement 3. Environment • Development of the Old Sakhelwe School area into a cultural park including sports facilities. • Closing of trenches between Mashila and Masinge Street • Illegal dumping – provision be made for removal and clearing up of illegal dumping area 4. Traffic calming measures • Speed humps in Boabab Str Dalpark Ext 5 • Speed humps in Morapedi Str Kwa Thema • Speed humps in Mhlabi Street Kwa Thema 5. Storm water management • Replace storm water pipes in Gerrit Maritz Ave Dalpark • In Kwa Thema – there is a need to improve the drainage system in most Streets. 6. Sewerage - The sewerage system in the areas of Tornado, Phomolo, riverside and terminus, Ekuthuleni & Mkhwancwa 7. Housing - Repairs at the Riverside, development of current hostel & upgrade infrastructure 8. Parks and Recreational facilities • Miller High Boxing Club in Monanetsi Str needs upgrading • Maintenance of Parks • Playground equipment in Parks 9. Street Names -Streets to be erected in all areas 10. Refuse bins - Needed in Kwa Thema ______________________________________________________________________________________

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WARD 75 Ward Councillor

D Stone

Needs identified 1. Housing and Sanitation - Never Never Upgraded 2. Roads - Reedville roads to be tarred 3. Pollock Park - Oasis Road need to be re-tarred 4. Hospital road - Road is narrow - it needs to be widened 5. Storm water drainage – Reedville - Impact of the rain on the road surface 6. Traffic Calming measures - Pollock Park speed humps need to be installed - 12 Marsibit Road and 4 Marsibit road 7. Pietersfield - Kent circle. Speed humps need to be installed in front of Dawie Creche 8. Electricity - Reedville - new additional floodlights & Brenthurst cable are stolen, need to be replaced with bundled cable 9. Economic Development and Municipal Infrastructure - Brakpan Mall, Lone Star steakhouse is running a successful business in this mall 10. SRAC - Reedville would like a community centre 11. Wright Park - Community Centre needed 12. Brakpan taxi rank needs to be upgraded 13. Brakpan Central Mall needs to be revamped 14. Money needs to be available for solid waste as Springs and Brakpan are being affected by illegal dumping 15. Money needs to be made available for Parks and grass cutting ________________________________________________________________________ WARD 76 Ward Councillor M Steyn Needs identified 1. Storm water drains needed in: • 1st Street – CBD • 2nd Street, from 5th avenue to 10th avenue – CBD • 1st avenue – CBD • Reier Street - Daggafontein extension 1 2. Roads (new): • Vlei Street from Nettleton Street to Smythe Street – Strubenvale • Smythe Street to Townsend - Strubenvale • Kraanvloel Street to Mossie Street –Daggafontein extension 1 • Loerie Street – Daggafontein extension 1 • Penquin Street- Struisbuilt • Fisan Street – Struisbuilt • Shrike Street – Struisbuilt • The scrapping of roads within informal settlement – Daggafontein (Vukuzenzeli informal settlement). The roads within the informal settlement are uneven; the residents have asked that the council please even out the roads. When it rains it becomes very muddy and vehicles land up having to dodge potholes that have been created. 3. Roads resurfacing •

Ruiter Street – Daggafontein extension 1

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• • • • • •

Clydesdale road - Casseldale and Daggafontein. Residents in the area have complained that because of the heavy traffic of trucks and motorists, the road can no longer handle the traffic flow. We request the road is made wider to accommodate the traffic and cyclists travelling to work and back. Vogelstruisbuilt Street – Daggafontein and Struisbuilt. Needs to be widened due to traffic congestion.. As above many cyclists use the road. There have already been a number of accidents in the area. The department needs to look into a safer place for taxis to park when collecting children for school. It is only a matter of time before the community becomes restless due to the lack of infrastructure Butler Street from Clydesdale Street to Wit road – Nuffield Hewitt Street – Selcourt Needs to be widened because it is one of the main roads leading to the industrial area. Coaton Street – Selcourt needs to be widened to regulate the flow of traffic and to accommodate cyclists travelling to work Van der Aardt – Selcourt needs to be resurfaced. The number of trucks using the road has caused major damage. An impact study needs to be conducted in this area to ensure proper maintenance is done on a regular basis Zigzag Street – Springs CBD. To be widened seeing that it is a main feeder into the CBD. Many accidents have already happened, as you cannot always see cyclists or pedestrians. Rhokana Street – Selcourt to be widened leading to an industrial area

4. Roads potholes • 1st Street – Springs CBD • Gull Street – Daggafontein extension 1 • Butler Street – Nuffield • Cadmium Street – Daggafontein industrial area • Asbestos Street - Daggafontein industrial area • Fluoride Street – Daggafontein industrial area • Kotze Street – Lodeyko • Park Avenue - Springs CBD – opposite Johan Jurgens High School •

Manholes - Ermelo Road opposite Tennis Courts and post office & 9th pavement at Kent Gardens complex

5. Traffic Calming measures - Gemsbok Street between Clydesdale and Springbok West in Edelweiss 6. Streetlights • There are a number of problems throughout ward 76 with regards to Street lights which either: o do not work, or o the timing is out of synch (particularly in the Strubenvale and Casseldale areas) • The problem may extend to further areas therefore I request that council do a study of the cause of this and budget for the problems to be fixed as soon as possible • Vogelstruisbuilt Street in Daggafontein needs urgent Street lights. Due to there being no Street lights it is a danger to motorists and residents in the area. The road leads to one of Springs’ major industrial role players (Zincor) 7. Road signs and names • Street name signs on poles and / or side walks to be made more visible to the public. • General road signs need to be replaced where they have been taken down (for whatever reason) 8. Parks and recreation Maintenance of the following: • The Mill – CBD 12th • Marks Park – Strubenvale • Park between Fryer & Wilhelmina – Recreation ground, Casseldale • Philip Bother Park - cnr Clydesdale and Wilhelmina

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George Sutter Selection Park

Residents in these areas have complained non-stop about the conditions of these parks. Serious intervention is needed to maintain the ponds, the play areas for children and to ensure grass is cut and the cuttings removed every 3 months. Please guarantee proper budgeting is done for this with urgent effect. o

Beautifying of CBD entrances e.g. water fountains area

Visitors to Springs, when entering, only see an unmaintained fountain - a shoddy state of affairs. This is no welcome for visitors. o

Grass cutting of side walks needs to be maintained regularly. I suggest that the council actually cuts the grass and uses herbicides to ensure the grass does not grow as quickly during rainy seasons and therefore look untidy.

9. Tree trimming in suburbs - Trees within the suburbs need to be cut back on a regular basis 10. Health • The mobile clinic in Daggafontein needs to provide more of a service, e.g. chronic lifestyle disease such as diabetics, blood pressure, TB awareness, and personnel hygiene. The residents have asked that this be provided as many of them are unemployed and cannot afford to travel to the Springs CBD for the above check-ups. • Illegal dumping & uncollected rubbish. Illegal dumping is turning our town into a dumpsite! Residents have had enough. We know that certain residents are to blame for the illegal dumping. But more should be done to stop this from happening: o

Open land towards Zincor opposite Struisbuilt Extension

o

Daggafontein

o

Vogelstruisbuilt Road - Cleaning or removing the Skip Bins – opposite informal settlement.

o Reier Street Daggafontein ext 1 - Illegal dumping is a sight for sore eyes. 11. Casseldale - Park in Wilhelmina and Fryer Road - rubbish is left 12. Strubenvale Extension -Lake Street - rubbish is dumped 13. 6th Street - town - Behind van Riebeck Hotel and Maxi Fresh – rubbish is dumped 14. Ermelo and Anker -There has been an increase in rubbish dumped as passengers wait for taxis

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15. 1st Avenue Springs CDB •

Many illegal dwellers have occupied the open land behind the clinic. The amount of rubbish left behind has caused great concern for the residents. Rats have now infested the area. A soup kitchen is operating from behind the Springs Senior Citizens Club – many “beggars” and illegal dwellers squat in the area and harass members of the churches and senior citizens who attend functions



Meter reading - Residents have complained that either meter readings are not taken or estimates are given. They have asked that the council provide a timetable of when meter readings will be done.



Recycling bin - Residents have suggested that more recycling bins are provided and placed in more convenient places throughout ward 76. If this is done, please could they be properly marked with which items are to be placed into them.



Illegal Businesses - Please could the council do a study of the number of illegal businesses conducted in residential areas?



Illegal Street hawkers and upgrading of Springs Train Station - There are plans being put in place to ensure council curbs the number illegal traders and to upgrade the Springs Train and Taxi Rank please could council inform me of its development on an on going basis.



Housing and Public Safety - Metro police

16. Ist Avenue CBD •

Many illegal dwellers have taken up residencein the open farm behind the Springs Senior Citizens club. These dwellers often harass members of church groups and senior citizens attending functions.



The residents living in flats (council owned) around the area are also bugged by the illegal dwellers. They often stick their heads through open windows. Residents of Toekom’s (council owned building) fear for their children’s safety.



There is a great concern that the dwellers living in the open sewage pipe in the area will escalate into an informal settlement.

• There have been reports that drug dealing takes place in the area too. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 77 Ward Councillor

F PADI

Needs identified 1. HOUSING • Eradication of waiting areas e.g. Ext 3 “D” • Building of houses e.g. 621 scheme 2. HEALTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT • Provision of Multipurpose Centre • Skills development • Opening of Selope Thema Clinic. 3. DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING - Rezoning of park stands into residential.

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4. SRAC • Grass cutting (ward-based) • Development of sports ground e.g. September ground, Barcelona grounds and Tennis court. 5. ROAD TRANSPORT AND CIVIL WORKS • Roads construction Ext 1 “Nyanyadu” o Magudulela Str, Masteme Street , Magagula Str, Mabuya Street , Malopyane Avenue, Matsemela Street , Ramabene Street & Kopa Street • Barcelona o Raborife Street, Radebe Street, Kope Street, Sokhele Street, Swelankomo Street, Msheledi Street, Tlekiso Street, Mtungwa Street, Radinne Street, Hlalitwa Street, Mthombeni Street, Mogatla Street, Mtlwatse Street, Kotobe Street, Naki Street, Mbele Street, Phakathi Street, Chiloane Street, Maloatle Street, Sepenyane Street & Manamela Street • Extension 3 o Metsing Street, Luthuli Street, Lumatha Street, Mazibuko Street, Mashadibane Street, Phezisa Street, Nhlapho Street, Holomisa Street, Mhlangabezi Street, Madikizela Street, Gugushe Street, Mojela to be continued from September to Vilakazi, Matsimela Street, Mashila Street, Masuku Street, Mncube Street, Matiwane Street, Masilela Street, Siqubu Street, Lekubu Street, Siyila Street, Masemula Street, Dlamini Street, Dyasi Street, Matsipa Street, Moema Street, Fahla Street, Njoko Street, Mabophe Street, Mnyamkazi Street, Mndawu Street, Malope Street, Five Street, Phasha Street, Ngayo Street, Sondiyazi Street, Keketso Street, Ncakaza Street, Mafosi Street, Rantla Street, Lintle Street, Phathudi Street, Mafuyane Street, Maleka Street, Nhlabathi Street, Norinco Street, Nomntshi Street, Thizathiza Street, 49.Browning Street, Ngamede Street, Dubazana Street, Paile Street, Pewu Street, Mtshali Street, Mxhasa Street & Nhlabathi Street • Extension 4 Phase 1 o Kgoadi Street, Madingoane Street, Mnisi Street, Phakathi Street, Ndungoane Street, Xaba 1 and Xaba 2 Street, Mphahlele Street & Masango Street • Extension 4 Phase 2 o Mabendi Street, W Mabuza Street, Mngomezulu Street, Ngwane Street, Jaquisa Street, Pitsi Street, J Block Street, K Busakao Street, D Mathayo Street, P Molefe Street, Mfelang Street, Ndina Street & Masilo Street • Engel Street at Selcourt Ext 3 to be maintained. • Potholes at Selcourt Ext 3 Phoenix Road • Potholes at Sam Ngema Drive near Interland Homes • Potholes opposite 1114 Moredu Street Ext 1 (Nyanyadu). • Potholes next to Nkumbulo School at Joe Mzamane Street • Potholes Jiyane Street Ext 2 near the graveyard. • Proclaimed CBD at Kwa-Thema Civic Centre • Repairing Tennis Court at Kwa-Thema Civic Centre. • Repairing swimming pool at Kwa-Thema sport complex. • Building of library at Kwa-Thema Ext 3. • Multipurpose Centre (Industrial Park) at Kwa-Thema Ext 3. • Storm water drainage Vlakfontein road (k151) next to Mbele Street Ext 2 Barcelona. • Storm water drainage Mona Street at the circle at mini Selcourt Kwa-Thema. • Storm water drainage corner Kwelemtini and Kubeka Street at Interland homes. • Tonk meter Street at the four way stop next to Vlakfontein road, we need Street light starting at Kgaswane Street untill the corner of Marule Street. • Cotton Street at Selcourt Ext 3 repair/service of Street light. • Streets names and road signs at Kwa-Thema Ext 1 and Interland Homes.

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Sport facilities with high mast light at Ward 77 -. Net Balls, Tennis Court & Cricket Joe Mzamane from Phulong to K151 to be build. Mojela from September to Joe Mzamane High mast at Barcelona Mthombeni Storm water drainage at corner Mahlasela Street and old age home (just next to Seventh Advertise Church)

6. Storm water drainage - All existing storm water drains should be cleaned and closed e.g. Ext 1, 2, 3, 4 and Nyayandu. 6. KERBS -The kerbing in Sam Ngema should continue starting from corner Philang School up until East Rand College. 7. SPEED HUMPS • Sam Ngema between Interland and Nyayadu. • Mojela next to Ext 3 and Masuku Street. • September road next to Ext 2. 9. CORP0RATE AND LEGAL SERVICES - Building of one Primary and Secondary Schools in Ext 3 and Barcelona. 10. LED – Ward-based job creation e.g. Cleaning campaign and Food gardening. 11. MUNICIPAL INFRASTRUCTURE • Development of Ext 3 waiting area “D” with water sanitation. • Installation of Street lights in Interland Homes, Mini Selcourt and Schachat Homes. • Street names and road markings or signs. 12. FINANCE - Pay point at Old Age Home. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 78 Ward Councillor

M L KWELEMTINI

Needs identified 1.

Roads Transport and Civil Works Road Construction o Mnareng, Mkhabela, Mcebi, Moepye, Kodisang, Lepelle / Maduna, Hlabane, Nyanyadu, Seage, Mamela & Dladla Streets 2. Sports Facilities • Ward-based grass cutting (Mthembu village) • Playgrounds scraping and leveling •

3. • •

Municipal Infrastructure Electricity upgrading Water system upgrading

4. Storm water drainage • Dladla Street, Hlabane and Mcebi Street. 5.

Speed humps

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Kgaswane Street, Ramothibe and Shabangu Street.

_________________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 79 Ward Councillor

T. Magagula

Needs identified 1. Housing • Eradication of waiting areas e.g. Langaville Extension 7 and Langaville Proper. • Building of houses e.g. 425 scheme 2. Health and social development • Skill development • Provision of Multipurpose Centre 3. Development and planning • Rezoning of 10 parks stands into residential. • Rezoning of two schools stands into residential. 4. SRAC • Development of sports ground (19531 Extension 7). • Grass cutting (ward-based) • Development of recreational facilities. 5. Road Transport and civil works 6. Roads construction • Mabhendi Street in Ext 6A,Lebilwane-Mfokeng-Tshabalala in Langaville Extension 7 • Ndungwane Street in Kwa-Thema Ext 6,Mokoni Street in White City • Modjadji Street in White City,Gauteng Avenue in Langaville Proper • Sambo Street in Langaville Proper,Musane Street in White City • Mcakumbane in Ext 6,Cornwell Phase 2 in Ext 7 should be completed - was left unfinished • Busakwe Street in 425,Maphanya-Kawu-Mbhidla in Deep Levels,Msikinya Street in White City 7. Storm water drainage • Corner Gauteng Avenue and Black road, next to Score Supermarket • Rapetsoa Street, next to stand number 177 to 180 in Langaville Extension 7A ,Cornwell Street, • Busakwe Street, Msikinya Street, Mashiqila Street, Ndungwane Street, Mampe Street • All existing storm water drains should be cleaned and maintained. 8. Speed humps • Black road next to Duduza Rank, Thema road next to Duduza Rank Tsindi Street • Vlakfontein road next to Ntokozweni ground • Motsugi from Nkosi Street and Mbalo and from Thathahane 9. Corporate and legal services - Building of one Primary and Secondary School in Langaville Proper. 10. LED – Ward-based job creation e.g. Chicken Farming.

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11. Municipality infrastructure • Development of 19530 stand water and sanitation • Water sanitation in the waiting area in Langaville Proper and Extension 7. • Installation of electricity in Kwa-Thema Extension 6A. 12. Finance • Vending Machine • Pay point in Langaville Proper _________________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 80 Ward Councillor

D Mlambo

Needs identified 1. Road construction • Shale Street Kwa-Thema vergenoeg requires extensive repair, Moagi Street Ext 6, Ranoko Street White City, Sidina Street Vergenoeg, Sibande Street, Pitsi Street Ext 6, Mnisi Street Ext 6, Jay Moyo Ext 6, Kgwadi Street Ext 6, Motlhaping Street, Noge Street, Consider paving/tarring of a circle in Bojabotsheha Street, • Passage linking Madi Street to Motlhaping needs some tarring as residents are throwing rubble and this result in inconvenience for nearby houses, • Mini-Taxis are a nuisance at Majola taxi rank and causing many accidents and inconvenience to pedestrians. 2. Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture - Grass cutting (ward-based). 3. Development and planning • Rezoning of 10 parks stands into residential. • Rezoning of 2 schools stands into residential. 4. Storm water drainage • Motlaping Street,Ncwadi Street, Lentle Street, Bangani Street, Sibanyoni Street • All existing storm water drainage systems to be unblocked e.g.Mtetwa Street, Silwane, Sibanyoni Street etc 5. Speed humps • Tshetlo Street next to Dr Lesia, Curve before Marule curve • Consider widening Rampela Street as it is Taxi route and there is heavy congestion during peak hours. • Urgent speed humps at Ncwadi Street. It is a main road and a church corridor. • Ndlovu Street, Vilakazi Street,Makoe Street 6. LED • •

Hawkers’ shelters with protective structures. Identify suitable area for hawkers

7. Municipal infrastructure • Upgrading of electricity, • Upgrade netball field at Xipu Street. • Upgrade soccer fields at Xipu and Lentle Street.

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Develop shopping centre at Rampela Street Old Street poles need to be removed at Kotana. Develop Kwa-Thema Civic Centre as a township shopping centre. Establish a Satellite Office in the ward.

8. Finances • Pay point at Duduza Rank. • Pay point at Kabinde 9. Housing • Building of houses (last phase). • 112 Houses need renovation • 106 houses to be built • Thembelisha Clinic need renovations • Consider social housing to reduce housing backlog. ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 81 Ward Councillor

C Bashele

Needs identified 1. Roads and storm water system • T. Mbeki Street in ext 5 Langaville, Thami Mtshazo Street in ext 18 Tsakane • John Gabuza Street ext 6 Langaville, • Maintenance of all roads in the ward • Canal flowing from ext 5 through ext 4, Canal flowing from ext 3 through ext 4 • Storm water network on the whole of Tugela road linking ext 4 and ext 7 Langaville • Storm water network flowing from Pholosong Hospital through ext 2 Langaville to Withok Spruit, • Accessibility of transport in different modes 2. Multi purpose complex • Police station including community court • Social Welfare and Home Affairs departments • Council services pay point and administration offices • Multi lateral business complex 3. Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture • Development of sporting multi purpose complex • Development of Arts and Cultural building (Hall) • Development of a sporting academy (school) • Gradering of all (7) informal fields in the wards 4. Infrastructure services • Provision of water and sanitation to all four informal settlements in the ward (ext 9, 6, 1 & 5) • Development of B.M.Q and proclamation • Provision of public lighting in terms of high mast lights & Street 5. High mast lights categories of areas - Ext -1=4, Ext 2=3, Ext 3=3,Ext-4=6, Ext 5=4, Ext 6=5,Ext 8=3 6. Street lights

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Public Street lights along black Reef Road Public Street lights along 12+6 roads Public Street lights through Vlak village Protective structures installation

7. Education • Building of a Higher Learning School, • Building of additional Primary school, • Building of a community crèche, • Building of a library 8. Job creation • Skills development • Speeding up of establishment co-operation • Poverty alleviation programme ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 82 Ward Councillor

S Saul

Needs identified 1. Roads / Streets-Rholihlahla (Tokyo), Cornwell (ext 5c 16845), Dunge, Roka, Govan Mbeki, Mathaba,Tau, Kgetsi 2. Street lights - Ngotsha & Nzima, 12th road, Ditlou, Modise, Modjadji, Phetla, Malandela 3. Highmast • Ngotsha & Nzima, Ngotha & Mbele, Passage (score ext 5b), Open veld (ext 12 + 5) - scrap yard, Buhlebemfundo and ext 5 boundry, Bridge and court area, Mamelong (Kim homes) ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 83 Ward Councillor

L Thembekwayo

Needs identified 1. Upgrading of parks in the ward • Sindane park for entertainment for 2010 public participation, greening and fencing • Calcot Dlephu park - greening and extra playing equipment and football ground • Upgrading the centre park next to the shopping centre • Upgrade school grounds 2. Street / road construction • First priority Streets: ° Hlubi str , Zuma str, Damakude, Ndongeni str, Thembekwayo str, Tina str, Nhlabathi str, Khumalo str, Masombuka str Mashize str • Secondary priority Streets ° Dunge str, Zwane str,Shiba str,Ndosi str,Matlala str,Matse str

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3. Speed reducing humps • Next to schools Tholulwazi, Mandlethu, Mangosuthu, Micheal Zulu and Tsakane High, Ndabezitha & Malendela str 4. Maintainance of Streets - Xhosa str, Cindi str, Sotho str, Naming and marking of Streets 5. Stormwater drainage/water lockes • Sotho str, Xhosa str, Ndwadwe str,Thembekwayo str,Nkosawa str,Mswati str,Sindane str,Nkosana 6. Clinic 7. Youth centres - There is a need for youth community centre and recreation centre 8. Senior citizens - Day care centre for all programmes for the elderly and the community 9. Housing • Repair of cracked houses • Building of houses for all applicants in possession of FORM C • Building of back roomed yards for indigent families • 10 families on the two stands awaiting houses were not allocated during allocation time, were on the business stand # 28452 and Molopo 27687 • Special projects for people who have bought stands from previous council national party, but their financial status changed and they were unable to build their houses for 20 years ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 84 Ward Councillor

A Mashigo

Needs identified 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

High mast light for extension 9 and 15 Storm water drainage Renovation of Duduza stadium Reservoir Extension 9 Xaba and Maqubeka Street repairs Playground extension 9 and 15 Tsakane Repairs - Nala and Jacobs Street, Duduza Humps - Ntinde and Huhlwana Street, Tsakane Repairs - Dube and Nqubane Street, Duduza Storm water - cnr Lethukuthula extension 9 and 15 Tsakane HIV/AIDS Park - near Emmause centre and reservoir Gate - old cemetery Humps - Nala and Ndudula Street Bus stop - extension 9 and 15 Access road to post box extension 1 Point for post box extension 9 and 15 Food garden Informal settlements (no proper stands) • Rockville section Ngwaketsi / Kolobeng Street / Marked K1-K17 • Compound shacks • Extension 19, 20 & 21

20. Sub-division - 36809 extension 17 21. Infrastructure (essential services) • 42382 extension 19, no water connection, no meters, no sewerage • This affects the entire block.

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4112-41124,41204,42381-42382,42157-42165,43925-43944,43876-43870,43976-43983,4387643870,43857-43863,43713-43714

22. Water logging • Thubelisha homes / Maloma Street • Mhlangano Street • Mhlaba Street • Thubelisha Maloma Street 23. Subsidy application - 35839 Tsietsi Moloena (house not yet built) 24. Street naming • Difficulty in accessing houses in times of emergency • Extension 17, 19 & 16 25. Roads Tertiary roads • Tarring of Kgari Street from Lwamondo to Ngwakatsi Street, Tarring of Bathoen Street from Phalane to Bakwena Street,Tarring of Kwena Street and Mohale from Seeiso to Qwathi steeet,Tarring of main road linking ext 16 & 17 (from stand 36023 to 36681) done,Tarring of Nkuna Street from Jumba to Mphefu,Tarring of Nkululeko Street from Lwamondo to Toyi-toyi Street,Tlou from Tlokwa to Hlakwana,Machobane from Tlokwa to Hlakwana,Tsonga from Jumba to Mphefu,Boreng from Kgaga to Seeiso,Roka from Kgaga to Kgoadi,Kolobe construction,Machobane construction,Tlou construction,Malome construction. Gravelling of roads • Bothoen from Ratladi to Thlako • Extension 13, 16 & 17 • Mhlaba from Jumba to Mphefu • Venda from Mphefu to Jumba • Tshivase Street from Jumba to Mphefu 26. Stormwater management - Mampuru (10593-10602), Ext 16 (35775-35762), Ext 13 (35614-35587), Ext 13 (38711-38758) 27. Upgrading of sports fields - Sports field ext 16 (stand 36258), Sports field (stand 8647), Sports field (stand 7389) 28. New highmast lights • Ext 16 X 3 high mass lights needed, Ext 17 X 3 high mass lights needed, Ext 12b X 3 high mass lights, Ext 13 X 2 high mass lights needed, Mhlaba (corner Mphefu & Lemba), Corner Tlokwa and Seeiso 29. Traffic calming measures-Mampuru,Toyi-toyi / Khanyile, Sotho, Lwamondo, Ndabezitha 30. Pedestrian walkways/safety improvements projects • Phalane, Lwamondo (scores of pedestrians to and from ext 12b and 13) • Walkway access to ext 13 (opposite stand 36297 and 36298) • Footpath access to ext 13 (between 35184 to 35288) • Walkways access to ext 16 (between 36297 and 36298) 31. Putting up and marking of new Street names.

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Street names in ext 12b, Street names in ext 13, 16 and 17 Installation of robots (corner Pedi and Ndabezitha)

32. Upgrading / Installaton of bulk meters • Extensions 12b, 13, 16 and 17 Tsakane • Most houses in Tsakane proper have broken or stolen water meters ______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 85 Ward Councillor

A Mnguni

Needs identified 1. New roads and storm • Mafabato Street extension 8, Nyenyakulu Street extension 8, Mamabolo Street extension 8,Cebekhulu Street extension 8, Sontweni Street extension 8 • Letsoalo Street extension 11, Dubazane Street extension 11, Motsuminyano Street extension 11,Thulani Street extension 11, Sabelo Street extension 11 • Sabelo Street extension 12, Buyisile Street extension 12, Hlanganini Street extension 12,Letsoalo Street extension 12,Sesulu Street extension 12 • Mudima Street Thubelisha next to R23, Kurhuleni Street Thubelisha next to R23, Chilli Street Thubelisha next to R23, Njelele Street Thubelisha next to R23, Kamaila Street Thubelisha next to R23 • Kgari Street Rockville, Phofu Street Industrial area Rockville, Bathoen Street Rockville, Thakadu Street Rockville,Hoga Street Rockville 2. New storm water and drains • Tsakane road main road extension 11 • Shakwane road main road extension 11 • Nhlangwini Street main road extension 08 • Mabunda Street main road extension 08 • Modjadji road main road extension 12 • Puseletso road main road extension 11 • Ndabezitha Street main road Rockville • Phalane Street main road Rockville 3. New side walk and Street lights • Puseletso main road extension 11 • Shakwane main road extension 11 • Tsakane road main road extension 11 • Nhlangwini Street main road extension 08 • Mabunda Street main road extension 08 • Modjadji road main road extension 12 • Ndabezitha main road Rockville • Phalane main road Rockville • Tsakane main road extension 8 • Kham main road Rockville 4. New recreational facilities • New library extension 8 at stand 18452 Mabunda Street extension 8 full service land

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• • • • •

New community hall at stand 945 corner Mabunda and Tsakane Street extension 8 full service land owned by council Pay point plus ward council or office at stand 944 Tsakane Street, extension 8, full service stand and land owned by Ekurhuleni council Post office at stand 1451 extension 8, full service land owner council Manufacturing advice centre and local business support centre at stand 1450 full service land owned by council New crèche at extension 8 stand 943 full service owned by council

5. Parks - New parks buffer zone stands 16937, 30296 and 30295 between extension 8 and 11 6. Temporary sports grounds • All sports codes at buffer zone between extension 8 and 12 • Temporary sports grounds at stand 1918 extension 8 - buffer zone 7. Education new schools EXT 8 • High school at stand 19184 extension 8 full service land • Primary school at stand 18051 extension 8 full service land • New multi-purpose centre at stand 17813 full service land 8. Disability - New disability centre at stand 19830 full service land 9. Satellite police station - New satellite police station at stand 1025 extension 8 Tsakane road next to R23 freeway 10. New high mast - Fifteen new high masts. In the entire ward 85 are needed 11. Humps • New humps at the following points or Streets: Hlangwini Street, Mabunda Street at extension 8 • New humps at Mthunzi Street Phiri Street and Embu Street, extension 11 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------WARD 86 Ward Councillor

T Mbonani

Needs identified 1. EXT 1 • • 2. EXT 4 • • • • •

Streets to be tarred and storm water drainage needed High mast

Houses to be built Highest Streets to be tarred and storm water drainage Electricity Toilets to be built

3. Blue Gum View • Process of houses to speed up

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• • • • • • • •

Streets to be tarred and storm water drainage Mobile library at multi purpose centre Mobile police station High mast to be repaired Primary school to be built Crèche needed Security camera Industrial centre to be built

4. Masechaba • Houses to speed up • High mast repaired • Streets to be tarred and storm water drainage • Steven Biko Street houses to get toilets • Transport for school children • Swapo Street to get toilets • Crèche • Post box repaired and secured • Fire station • Hydrant 5. EXT 9 • • • • • • • • • •

Post box to be provided, post office Streets to be tarred and storm water drainage Community hall, library to be built Sport facility, Parks, Sidewalks Primary school, Crèche Industrial centre High mast repaired Youth centre and art centre Sonnestraal Street lights needed Fourways of Gugulethu and Sonnestraal - robots to installed

6. EXT 17 • High masts • Houses to be built • Streets and storm water drain ______________________________________________________________________________ WARD 87 Ward Councillor

T Mabena

Needs identified 1. SIDE WALKS DEVELOPMENT: LIST OF STREET NAMES AND PASSAGES: • Mayaba to Ntomela • Ntomela to Nonjekwa • Nonjekwa to Sibeko • Thipe to Leopeng

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Tsakgane to Modupe

______________________________________________________________________________________ WARD 88 Ward Councillor

J Ceronio

Needs identified 1. Completion of road between Nigel and Springs 2. Repair and tarring of roads in Masechabaview 3. Repairing of roads in Nigel 4. Upgrading of Sewerage in Nigel 5. High mast lighting 6. Old age homes Alrapark 7. Repair of stadium 8. Sporting facilities in Masechabaview 9. New palisade fence 10. Repair and maintenance of John Vorster Stadium and toilets 11. Traffic calming measures in Rhodes Ave 12. After hours pay point for municipal rates in Nigel 13. Upgrading roads in Alrapark 14. Robot at the intersection of Dunnottar Army base 15. Housing in Alrapark 16. Completion roads 17. Adequate road sign 18. Upgrade SPCA 19. Upgrade of clinics 20. Facilities for Street traders __________________________________________________________________________________

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2.3

GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT

The following is a summary of the matters that came out of the Growth and Development Summit held on 1 and 2 September 2006. These have been taken up in the plans and programmes of the respective departments. 2.3.1

SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

The submission received at the Summit was included in the presentation made by the MMC for Housing on the last day of the Summit. Hereunder please see the discussion points as well as resolutions. Discussion Points         

Need to revise the policies and frameworks of EMM. Ensure that maintenance and operational costs are factored into plan. Ensure that service delivery across spheres in coordinated. Revisit list of socio-economic amenities and standards. Need for further consultation with relevant stakeholders. Ensure that future growth is factored into the plan. Integrate the summit deliberations into the IDP. Ensure we revisit the standards of homes provided. Need for Provincial and National buy-in

Resolutions                 

Resolve to include and align the EMM GDS with the IDP to ensure responsiveness to the needs of the community. Ensure that Housing be utilised to coordinate the implementation of the Human Settlements Plan. Allow for the implementation of energy efficient housing development. EMM to provide the necessary funding, subject to availability of funds, to fund the Human Settlements Plan. Resolve to proactively acquire land for sustainable human development. Promote security of tenure. Investigate incentives to promote private sector and SMMEs in the programme. Ensure that the programme allows for LED. Promote municipal/community partnerships to allow for sustainable environmental development. Promote social crime prevention strategies in the programme. Integrate an HIV and AIDS plan in the programme. Promote Community Based Initiatives Promote the use of Brownfields and utilised buildings for development. Develop a strategy for in-migration. Utilise Sustainable Human Settlements to reverse the loss of environmental resources. Review the size, structure and patterns of new housing development to ensure aesthetic value of settlements. Sustainable Human Settlements can only be achieved through an integrated approach by all departments in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality as well as intensified coordination between the three spheres of government and elimination of red tape.

All the questions received and matters discussed at the Summit are strategic and these matters are currently being addressed in the MHDP, IDP, Budget as well as the new funding model which was approved for the Sustainable Human Settlements Plan of the Housing Department.

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Social and economic amenities to be indicated in the IDP and MHDP are new issues to be addressed in the GDS 2025 for coordination with other departments and their budgets towards the creation of Sustainable Human Settlements. 2.3.2

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND JOB CREATION COMMISSION

Economic Development and Job Creation Focus Areas • • • •

Job Placement Programme Competitiveness and Supplier Networks in Manufacturing and Construction Enterprise Development Cooperatives

Additional Points • • • • • •

Ward Committees to be provided with training and capacitation on the economy (National LED Toolkit to be implemented by March 2007). All developments in Ekurhuleni to involve local labour in the area of the development. Access to land for economic activity must be a simple and uncomplicated process. Local procurement to meet the BEE and start-up targets. DTI to assess the impact of training and mentoring of SMMEs and Communities projects (CBOs). Ekurhuleni East Further Education and Training College committed to supporting township businesses with training and mentoring.

Key Agreements Halve unemployment and poverty by 2014 “ Job PLACEMENT PROGRAMME” – key link programme to achieve this • Ekurhuleni partnership with Department of Labour o Service from government to business on recruitment o Service to citizens on jobs linked to the economic upswing • Targets: 1000 placements per year (2007) and an incremental increase each year thereafter. Key Agreements Halve unemployment and poverty by 2014 “ Job PLACEMENT PROGRAMME” – major programme to achieve this • Ward Committees committed to volunteer to register unemployed at the Local Labour Centres • FET Colleges to be service providers for skills development and career guidance, as part of Job Placement Programme • Register unemployed graduates as part of the Job Placement Programme • Labour to provide list of retrenchees on a quarterly basis • Expanded Public Works Programme to be used to provide indigent households with exist mechanisms from poverty, through Job Placement Programme Key Agreements: Competitiveness and Supplier Networks “Partnerships for Sustainable Development” • Industry based partnerships • Base Metal Incubator (Metal fabrication – zinc and, later on, brass)

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o 12 new manufacturers in Ekurhuleni by 2009 o Black businesses and local LaFarge (construction industry) o Benefit must be spread across all wards o Specific targets must be set for youth and women o Opportunities and projects must be local, national, within Africa and in the world

Key Agreements: Competitiveness and Supplier Networks “Partnerships for Sustainable Development” • Manufacturing Base o Agree with the local, provincial and national government analysis and interventions to revitalise manufacturing  Manufacturing Supplier Network  National Casting Technology Centre  Industry Clusters o Knock-on effects in the local economy must include BBBEE and SMME development Key Agreements: Enterprise Development “Partnerships for Sustainable Development” • Standard Bank o Finance support linked to training and mentoring will have the effect of improving the health of local businesses o Finance for start-up businesses will allow entry into the economy o Targets to be set and monitored • Wits Business School o Continue to deepen the understanding of poverty and survival activity o Interventions to support traders to be rolled out by 2008 Key Agreements: Enterprise Development “Partnerships for Sustainable Development” • Business Linkage Centres o Key partnership with EBA o Support and presence must be extended to townships Key Programmes Building Cooperatives. Develop a cooperatives sector by 2014 “Cooperative Industrial Hives Programme” • Cooperatives Conference – cooperators to cooperate with each other – 31 October 2006 • Key points for deliberation o Set aside services such as cleaning and security for Cooperatives in the supply chain process o Skills development for cooperatives o Marketing programme – buy from cooperatives o Challenges linked to the sector and the independence of cooperatives o Access to funding for cooperatives 2.3.3

INVESTMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

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Key focus areas • • • • • • • • •

Ekurhuleni IDP, SDFs, GDS National perspective on Spatial Planning Department of Transport interventions/projects in Ekurhuleni Challenges related to land alienation SANRAL road projects in Ekurhuleni Gauteng DPTRW Programmes targeting Ekurhuleni Global City Region ACSA Master Plan Retail opportunities in Ekurhuleni

Expected outcomes • • • • •

Commitment in terms of partnering with EMM Integrated planning/action plans Integrated budgeting from all spheres of government Promotion of investment in townships Programme of action for land release by local government

Commitment i.t.o. partnering with EMM • • • •

Active participation of the private sector in forums and other institutional structures of Council SME sector to partner with the retail sector National/provincial/EMM budget alignment desired for projects Private sector to consider budget provision for bulk services in order to facilitate development

Integrated planning/action plans • • • • •

Integration of land use and transport is still a challenge Coordination (vertical & horizontal) still problematic, although alignment of projects/programmes are improving Legal processes between EMM and provincial government need improved coordination Urban renewal to focus on CBDs and other areas of need Planning for sustainable development in EMM

Integrated budgeting from all spheres of government •

National and provincial projects/programmes to be communicated to EMM in order to align budgets

Promotion of investment in townships • •

Government charters to assist development Untapped development opportunities in townships (manufacturing, retail, etc.)

Programme of action for land release by local government • • •

Rebuild economy of EMM Development agency to be investigated Shortened legal processes to fast-track development

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• •

Acquisition of Council-owned land still problematic BEE to be incorporated into alienation process/policy

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2.3.4

INTEGRATED TRANSPORT PLANNING AND SERVICES

Various inputs, concerns raised and issues for clarity were received from the participants in the Commission. These issues are summarised and, to some degree, combined in the topics indicated below: Rail: • •



• • • • •

It was indicated that the change of the railway gauge (from narrow to the wider gauge) is not required at this stage. It will result in a major infrastructure upgrade. It was indicated that the turnaround time for the services on the SARCC/Metrorail should be indicated (frequency and punctuality). It was indicated that due to the ageing rolling stock, breakages occur more often than the acceptable norm. The refurbishment of the rolling stock will go a long way in addressing this problem. It was further indicated that the local authority should dictate the service requirements (with respect to punctuality, frequency, etc) There was an indication that the railway line should be extended from Daveyton towards Etwatwa. The same applies for the extension of the Kwesine line to the Vosloorus area, eventually linking up with the Kwatsaduza area. It was indicated that apart from the proposed improvements to the railway corridors, a number of planning corridors are identified which include the Kwesine-Katlehong extension, the Daveyton-Etwatwa extension and the Tembisa loop. It was indicated that the railway service should focus on serving the areas of Kwatsaduza, the Katorus area and the Daveyton/Etwatwa area. The differential on the tickets for Gautrain was discussed. It was indicated that it should be noted that the Gautrain is not subsidised, while the SARCC/Metrorail is subsidised. On the question of job creation and training, it was indicated that the Gautrain will cater for 7500 learnerships, distributed between the metros. It is also envisaged that 34 000 temporary jobs will be created (during construction) and 2 500 permanent jobs. It was also indicated that interaction on issues of rail planning with the neighbouring municipalities are essential to ensure an integrated approach. It was indicated that Gautrain will not be competing for market share against bus, taxi or rail systems, but against the private car. The whole structure of Gautrain was based on business principles. The concessionaire will be allowed 5 years to built the system, and then be granted 15 years to operate the system. It should be noted that the system has the potential to build the economy of EMM.

Capacity/Skills Development: • • • • •

It was indicated that special implementation vehicles (in terms of processes and capacity) should be created to deal with major infrastructure investments as indicated by all the presenters. Clarity was required with respect to the issue of integrated ticketing, and how it will be rolled out. Throughout all discussions the issue of creating jobs was emphasised as essential. Apart from job creation, which was a common theme throughout the deliberations, skills development was also emphasised as a major consideration in all infrastructure projects. The improvement of skills throughout the system was highlighted, including the training of marshals and taxi drivers as well as awareness campaigns encouraging commuters to also take responsibility for infrastructure.

General Planning Issues: • • • •

There was a need expressed for a desire line between Etwatwa and Daveyton towards Tembisa and Midrand. Midrand was viewed as a major destination. Park and ride facilities were also proposed for all railway stations. A proposal was made for staggering working times for businesses. It was indicated that business should be involved in the extensions of the public transport system.

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• • •

It was also indicated that rail is not the only solution. We also need roads and other forms of public transport. The need for integrated transport planning was highlighted. Support was expressed for the Transport Authority process.

Taxis and Buses: • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

It was also suggested that pricing be differentiated for different areas. The whole structure of taxi tariffs was debated and clarity is sought on the structure. It was indicated that with respect to taxi-recapitalisation, further engagement with the community/operators is required. A concern was raised that focus was limited to 15- or 35-seaters, and no attention was given to the 4 + 1 taxis. It was felt that this service should be involved in the system and should also be controlled. A process is required to facilitate movement from an informal environment to a more structured environment. Training of all involved in the taxi industry was expressed as an urgent issue. This relates to taxi operators, commuters, marshals, etc. (See also comment under Skills Development above.) An overview of the taxi-recapitalisation process was given by the Director of Public Transport. It was indicated that the focus of the programme is aimed at a general clean-up of the service, an improved customer-orientated approach, and improved safety. The pillars of the process were therefore safety, regulation, the scrapping of the old fleet, law enforcement as well as economic development. It was further indicated that this process will be rolled out over 7 years through a R 7.7 billion investment. The conversion of operating licenses to route-based licenses is also critical. It was also indicated that transport planning should be brought down to municipality level. It was also put forward that law enforcement is critical to ensure compliance not only to the legislative framework, but also in terms of roadworthiness. It was also indicated that the EMM is looking at taxi-ranks and readiness for the taxi-recap process. With respect to institutional arrangements, the 22 local taxi associations are represented in one properly elected structure. The 4 + 1 taxis are included in this forum. A need was expressed for structured fees for the various taxi routes. A need was also expressed for the maintenance of taxi ranks. Sustainability was a concern. Sustainable jobs needs to be created. The establishment of a commuter forum was indicated as a requirement. Clarity was sought on the position of taxi precincts.

General Public Transport Issues: • • • • • • • • •

It was proposed that incentives must be introduced to attract people to public transport. It was indicated that integrated ticketing will be a major challenge. With respect to the Vosloorus area it was indicated that the preferred mode between rail and bus should be investigated. It was indicated that a need exists to explain the proposed Strategic Public Transport Network. A need was expressed for municipal buses in the townships. The service should be extended. There was a need expressed that the transport system needs to be improved. The transport network must make provision for people with disabilities. This was also a common theme throughout the deliberations. This also includes people that cannot read, for whom colour coding could assist. A need was expressed for shelters at taxi and bus lay-byes. The freedom of choice was indicated as an important consideration with respect to public transport services.

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General Safety Concerns: • •



The issue of safety in the transport system was indicated as critical. The need for a railway line extension from Daveyton/Etwatwa towards the Kwatsaduza area was highlighted. Similarly, a rail extension from Springs to Welgedacht was also proposed. It was also indicated that a direct service between Springs and Pretoria, without having to transfer at Germiston station, is required. It was suggested that security at railway stations needs to be improved and that there is a need for CCTV on stations. In addition, security in the trains should be improved. Issues such as the closure of doors, sanitation in the trains and comfort were also highlighted.

Road Construction: • •

• • • • • • •

Monitoring of contractors was highlighted as a major requirement with respect to all infrastructure projects in order to ensure value for money and quality of work. A plea was made for improved cooperation between EMM and developers with respect to the requirements in terms of infrastructure provision. There exists an opportunity to participate. Land-owners and developers should be consulted in the planning of routes, interchanges, etc. The developers want to be included in strategic planning with respect to roads and stormwater. Provision of pedestrian walkways and cycle paths was viewed as an important component of transport services. A strong view was expressed for the creation of linkages between the various activities of, and the various nodes within, EMM, for example between work and home. It was felt that an integrated approach is essential. Transportation should be linked to housing planning, land-use planning, etc. Asset management was put forward as a critical element (this is linked to the issue of quality of infrastructure). A need was expressed for improved road call centres that are properly manned by well-trained, informed operators. Response times for complaints should be set (say within 24 hours). Roads around schools should receive priority. Signage to schools is also important. Maintenance of existing assets must receive the appropriate priority. Designs should cater for accessibility issues (by cyclists/wheelchairs, etc).

Freight: • • • •

A need was expressed for clarity on how the community can get involved in the whole issue of freight. It was proposed that consideration be given to control the times of trucks on the roads. Security issues around the station at Natalspruit were highlighted. The development of Sentrarand as a logistics hub was proposed.

Feedback to the Plenary Meeting on 2 September 2006 A presentation was prepared that provided an overview of the discussions of the Commission held on 1 September 2006. The feedback presentation is attached as Annexure F. Further inputs were again received as a result of the presentation. The written inputs are attached as Annexure G to this report. The verbal inputs can be summarised as follow: • • •

It was indicated that roads are viewed as a constraint for unlocking development (Commission 3). The integration of land-use and transportation planning is still viewed as a major challenge (Commission 3). Mixed income development, although proposed, does create a challenge for public transport (Commission 3).

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• • • • • • • • • •



Local contractors need to be involved in the construction of roads (Commission 3). The Sentrarand/Bapsfontein/Daveyton area was indicated to be considered for economic development. The need for the Springs railway line extension to Welgedacht was submitted as input and for consideration. There was a view that scholar transport is not addressed in the work of the Commission and should be addressed. The issue of monitoring of road construction was again indicated as an important component to ensure quality and integration. It was proposed that different construction methods be considered for road construction (pavement bricks versus tar, for example). It was proposed that the working class should be involved in the roll-out of the freight strategy. A proposal was made for a centralised bus service. Over-crowding on the Germiston-Pretoria railway line was identified as a concern. On taxi recap it was indicated that the scrapping allowance of R 50 000 is not enough. A concern was raised with respect to taxi violence.

Way Forward In the development of the Integrated Transport Plan (ITP) all these inputs will be considered and, where applicable and possible, will be addressed in the strategies/objectives to be developed as part of the ITP. The above is also relevant to any other strategic plans to be developed or to be reviewed. As the ITP will be input into the IDP, these issues will find their way into the strategic planning of the department and the Council.

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CHAPTER 3: VISION, MISSION AND STRATEGY 3.1

INTRODUCTION

Strategic work undertaken by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) since 2000, as part of the IDP formulation process, includes the development of a vision, mission and core organisational values. Certain strategic priorities were also identified by the organisation. In terms of the GDS 2025, the long-term strategy of EMM focus on four strategic focus areas: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Infrastructure and services, Economic Transformation, Social transformation, and Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development

The strategic focus of the Ekurhuleni GDS 2025 is to build on the vision of the EMM. The IDP focuses on the development of programmes and projects that will work towards achieving the eighteen different focus areas that contain milestones and deliverables in terms of the 2025 Agenda in the GDS 2025. These deliverables will help us achieve the vision of the EMM to become: The Smart, Creative and Developmental City To forge ahead towards achievement, our mission statement was developed based on this vision: Ekurhuleni provides sustainable and people centred development services that are affordable, appropriate and of high quality. We are focused on social, environmental and economic regeneration of our city and communities, as guided by the principles of Batho Pele and through the commitment of a motivated and dedicated team. In pursuing our vision and mission, the EMM is committed to upholding the following core values: -

Performance Excellence Through excellent teamwork we strive to continuously improve our skills, processes and systems. Our service will be responsive, professional and of a high quality. Integrity Displaying honesty, respect, dignity and care in our work and eradicating all forms of unfair discrimination and corrupt practices. Taking ownership of all we say and do towards everyone around us. Community Centeredness Based on the principles embodied in Batho Pele, we grow respect through involving communities and ensuring development. The people we serve and represent come first. Transparency Ensuring that all stakeholders have access to relevant information that enhances partnerships. Co-operative Governance As a municipality we will initiate, implement and evaluate legislation and programmes with other spheres of government.

-

Seven strategic development priorities were identified by the EMM and a number of them are already being addressed by means of Mayoral Special Projects. These strategic priorities are: -

Promoting Good Governance;

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3.2

Fighting Poverty and Underdevelopment; Urban Renewal; Job Creation; Safety and Security; Partnership against HIV/Aids; and Enhancing Public Participation. STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT AGENDA 2025 In terms of the Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy 2025 the following Strategic Focus Areas , 2025 Agenda with related Outcomes and Milestones are set.

STRATEGIC FOCUS AREA OUTCOMES AND MILESTONES INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES STRATEGIC FOCUS AREA Spatially fragmented, inequitable city.

Poor transportation linkages and mobility.

2025 AGENDA

OUTCOMES AND MILESTONES

An integrated and equitable city.

• Improved accessibility and mobility throughout the metropolitan area. • Strong east-west corridor along the N12 / N17 freeways and north-south corridor along the R21 freeway. • Densified urban areas – infill development on vacant and underutilized land between the urban core and the peripheral township areas. • A managed and respected urban edge.

High quality, integrated and • Effective and integrated planning and implementation: well-maintained * Integrated Transport Plan in place by 2007. transportation infrastructure, integrated public transport * Transport Authority established by 2009. systems, ensuring a high * Road Agency established by 2012. degree of mobility and • High quality integrated and well-maintained infrastructure : choices to commuters. * Roads building programme in place by 2006.



• •

* Current backlog of gravel roads to be eradicated in 2015. Additional freeways built : * Upgrading R21 and R24 for additional capacity and HOV lanes by 2010. * PWV 13/14 built by 2020. * PWV 15 built by 2025. A strategic network of public transport corridors providing sub-regional linkages. Improved usage of public transport services : * Taxi recapitalization by 2010. * Modal integration for public transport to Gautrain by 2010. 136

STRATEGIC FOCUS AREA OUTCOMES AND MILESTONES * Bus services to cover all areas in Ekurhuleni by 2015. * Transport information center established by 2020. * Start building additional rail linkages by 2020. * Modal transfer facilities provided at all stations by 2025. • More use of non-motorised transport: * Pedestrian and bicycle-strategies in place by 2007. High quality and wellAgeing and maintained services, poorly-maintained equitable services throughout the urban areas trading services infrastructure and inadequate access to basic services .

Environment.



Well-maintained services in all areas. * All maintenance backlogs to be eradicated by 2010. • All communities to have equitable access to services: * All people to have access to potable water by 2008. * All people to have access to basic sanitation services by 2010. * All people to have access to electricity by 2012. • More sustainable disposal of solid waste: * Comprehensive waste minimization strategy [including recycling] to be in place by 2007. • Improved stormwater management : * Stormwater Masterplan to be in place by 2007. * Stormwater system backlogs to be eradicated by 2020.

A substantial increase in the • A clearly defined and functional open space network: general quality of the * Open space plan to be finalised by 2007. environment * 50% of open space system to be developed by 2015. * 100% of open space system to be developed by 2025. • All development to be guided by an EMF: * EMF’s for the entire Ekurhuleni area to be in place by 2006. •

Measurable decline in land, water and air pollution : * Pollution monitoring systems to be in place by 2010. • Measurable increase in the utilisation of alternative energy sources: * Strategy to be in place by 2010. • Substantial environmental improvement in the mining belt: * Implementation of Hloekisa project to commence by 2006. * All mine dumps/slimes dams with economically viable mineral content to be removed by 2025. * All other mine dumps/slimes dams to be rehabilitated to acceptable standards by 2025. • Integrated and sustainable protection of natural resources: * Wetland conservation strategy and programme to be in place by 2007. 137

Lack of a clear identity.

A well-developed and vibrant core economic area which imparts a unique character and identity to Ekurhuleni

The need for Functional, sustainable, and urban renewal. attractive urban areas

Inadequate ICT

Labour Absorption and

Productive and resourceful application of ICT.



An identified core economic area : * Area identified in 2004 to be prioritized i.t.o. development. • Increased development and investment in the core economic triangle of Ekurhuleni: * Gautrain construction and related development adjacent to ORTIA. * Successful development of the R21 corridor. * Successful development of the Government Precinct in Germiston. * Subsidy-linked housing development in the mining belt. •

Normalisation of urban economy areas reflected through minimal vacancy rates, high investor confidence and high demand for expansion. Quality public environment guiding, promoting and sustaining private investment and development expansion in urban economy areas. Supportive institutional capacity, commitment and approach. * By 2010 : - Basic prerogatives for implementation in place: - Service delivery, security, incentives, land use support, initial catalysts. - Administrative structure in place ensuring accountability and support. - PPP’s in place. - Development agency in place. * By 2015 : - Committed public investment framework and programme. - Committed large-scale private investments. - Measurable and sustainable growth in urban economy areas.



World-class ICT infrastructure in support of the Gauteng “Smart Province” vision and economic growth in Ekurhuleni. * Institutional structure to support/accommodate external ICT focus by 2006. * 100% Synergy and connectivity with our development partners, including government, by 2010.

ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION Unemployment to be • Reduced unemployment. reduced by half in 2014 and * EMM Job summit to be held in 2006. 138

Job Creation

Sustainable Economic Diversification

Improving Skills Levels

by half again in 2025 based on the unemployment figures of 2004. A diversified local economy able to meet local needs, support sustainable development and adapt to changes in accordance with global demands and shifts.

A skilled community exhibiting capabilities in self–reliance, innovation and continued reskilling to meet the needs of a growing economy

Tourism To promote the economy of Promotion and the region, create jobs and Development a safe and secure environment, by establishing a tourism destination of choice.

Investment Promotion and Facilitation

Increased inward investment in skills and technology, property and sustainable development.

* 50% reduction in unemployment by 2015. * 75% reduction in unemployment by 2025. •

Sustainable growth in a variety of local economic sectors. * By 2010 : - A range of Government incentives to be in place. - A measurable increase in “Smart Industries” [Aerospace, I.T., Logistics, Plastics, Agroprocessing]. * By 2015 : - A measurable increase of exports into Africa.



Improved mechanisms and programmes to impart skills: * EMM Centre of Excellence to be established by 2006. * Mentoring programme for project management and technical skills to be implemented by 2007. * Institute of Technology to be established by 2010. * Ongoing strengthening of ties with Educational Institutions.



Improved Skills: * Measurable increase in the % of the population which is technically and scientifically skilled by 2015. * Adult illiteracy wiped out by 2020.



Development of tourism facilities: * By 2010 : - Exploitation of opportunities created by Soccer World Cup. - African Shopping Hub, Craft Market and Wine Emporium developed. - Business tourism facilities around the ORTIA. •

Increased tourism: * Ekurhuleni to be the preferred sporting/cultural/heritage destination by 2015. * Business tourism to increase by 50% by 2020.



Increased levels of public and private investment in all areas: * By 2010 : - A range of government investment incentives to be in place. -

Measurable increase in effective service delivery and 139

information dissemination through “Customer Care Centre” implementation. -

CID’s in place.

* From 2015 onwards: - Measurable increase in investment in strategic priority areas such as the mining belt. Broad-based Economic Transformation

Poverty and Unemployment

An inclusive, wealthgenerating economy.



Greater participation in the formal economy by all sectors of society. * Strategy i.r.o. leveraging EMM assets to ensure BBBEE to be in place by 2007. * Enabling procurement policy to be fully implemented by 2008.

SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION In line with the national • Improvement in skills levels: objective, the aim is to halve * All milestones as set out under the “Focus Area : poverty in the next 10 years Improving Skills Levels” are relevant. up to 2015, and to halve it • Reduction in unemployment: again in the following 10 * All milestones as set out under “Focus Area : Labour years, up to 2025. Absorption and Job Creation” are relevant. • Poverty relief and other social programmes: * Integration to be achieved between all initiatives/programmes and institutions driving such initiatives/programmes, by 2010.

Creation and Promotion of Sustainable Human Settlements.

All people in Ekurhuleni to be housed in integrated and functional sustainable human settlements.

Access to Health Care and the Impact of HIV/Aids and Poverty Related Disease.

Equitable health care and facilities across all sectors of society–substantially reduced rates of poverty– related disease.

• • • • • • • •

Upgrading/formalisation of all informal settlements, including the eradication of the basic services backlog, to be achieved by 2012. Housing backlog [including the formalisation of backyard shacks] to be eradicated by 2015. Social amenities backlog to be eradicated by 2020. Functional partnership achieved and maintained with all social institutions in EMM by 2010. Measurable increase in community-based HIV/Aids programmes by 2010. Acceptable access to Primary Health Care and social development services by all communities [including rural communities] by 2015. 50% reduction in maternal and child-under-five mortality rates by 2015. Environmental pollution levels to be in line with internationally-accepted standards by 2015. 140



Safety and Security

A high level of safety and security – a drastically reduced crime rate.

Extending operating hours to 24 hours in all health centres and large clinics by 2025 • By 2010: * Pro-active management of disasters in accordance with an integrated and comprehensive Disaster Management Plan.



* Elimination of civil disobedience by means of various community–based programmes and drives. By 2015: * 50% Reduction in serious and violent crimes. * 50% Reduction in fatalities and injuries due to occupational, domestic and road accidents.

Inequitable, Poorly-maintained Parks, Sports and Recreational Facilities

Ekurhuleni to have worldclass parks, sports and recreational facilities.



By 2010: * Upgrading of 4 stadia in Ekurhuleni to world-class level. • By 2015: * Reclamation of our African identity through arts, culture and heritage. • By 2025: * Equitable provision of facilities to all communities in Ekurhuleni. * 100% of the Metro-wide open space system to be developed and maintained.

To enable EMM to fully implement the above outcomes and milestones, the institution should support in terms of institutional transformation by providing the administrative under build for the above. The table hereunder reflect the principles and focus of this area. PRINCIPLE Leadership Service Delivery Discipline

Transparency

Independence

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT APPROACH AND FOCUS Sound political and management leadership is required to steer the EMM towards the fulfillment of its vision, mission and the desired GDS outcomes. Better service delivery through the principles of Batho Pele will underpin all activities which the EMM are engaged in, prior are planning to embark upon Corporate discipline is a commitment by the EMM’s senior management to adhere to behavior that is universally recognized and accepted to be correct and proper. This encompasses the EMM’s awareness of, and commitment to, the underlying principles of good governance, particularly at senior management level. Transparency is the ease with which an outsider is able to make meaningful analysis of the EMM’s actions, its economic fundamentals and the non-financial aspects pertinent to the organisation. This is a measure of how good management is at making necessary information available in a candid, accurate and timely manner – not only the audit data but also general reports and press releases. It reflects whether or not stakeholders obtain a true picture of what is happening inside the organisation. Independence is the extent to which mechanisms have been put in place to minimise or avoid

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Accountability

potential conflicts of interest that may exist, such as dominance by a strong chief executive. The decisions made, and internal processes established, should be objective and not allow for undue influences. Individuals or groups in the EMM who make decisions and take actions on specific issues, need to be accountable for their decisions and actions. Mechanisms must exist and be effective to allow for accountability. These provide stakeholders with the means to query and assess the actions of the Council and its committees.

Responsibility

With regard to management, responsibility pertains to behavior that allows for corrective action and for penalizing mismanagement. Responsible management would, when necessary, put in place what it would take to set the EMM on the right path.

Fairness

The systems that exist within the EMM must be balanced in taking into account all those that have an interest in Ekurhuleni and its future. The rights of various groups have to be acknowledged, respected and balanced against each other. The EMM implemented the following measures to ensure that the ethics and practices of corporate governance are deepened within its structures: The EMM has established a distinct audit function, which in its practice adheres to the prescripts of the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA), which is the professional body that governs Internal Audit in the country. In addition, the Directorate of Internal Audit in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality also borrows from guidelines of the King II report on Corporate Governance, the Municipal Finance Management Act and COSO guidelines on risk Management. These guidelines form the cornerstone of good governance within the institution.

Audit Function

Fraud Hotline

The EMM has established an anticorruption hotline, which is also resident within the Directorate of Internal Audit.

External Audit

The EMM as a public institution is audited by the office of the Auditor General as prescribed by the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. However, the relationship between the EMM and the Auditor General is cascaded to lower levels through the participation by members of the Auditor General’s office in structures of the EMM such as the Audit Committee and others. This ensures that the Office of the Auditor General deepens their understanding of the operations of their client, thereby offering advice on an early basis rather than on an historic basis The Municipal Finance Management Act and other best practices on this subject such as the King II report on Corporate Governance require that an institution like the EMM conduct risk assessment workshops on a yearly basis so that it will be able to prioritise allocation of resources to the best interest of the organisation. Through the risk profile of the organisation, Internal Audit drafts its audit plan for the year. This practice insures that the work of Internal Auditors be directed by the needs of the organisation The Rules Committee oversees compliance by councillors with the Code of Conduct as well as matters referred or related to the Standing Orders By-Laws and acts as a Disciplinary Committee for Councillors. The Rules Committee also ensures that proper procedure is followed in Council’s decision-making processes.

Risk Management

The Rules Committee

Municipal By-Laws

The Municipal Code (By-Laws) as well as the Register of Tariffs applicable within the EMM are kept, maintained and updated in terms of the relevant legislation.

Delegation of Powers

A system of delegation of powers within the legislative framework is maintained in the Register of Delegation of Powers that maximises administrative and operational efficiency but still provides adequate checks and balances to ensure the retaining of responsibility and accountability. Policies and procedures approved by the EMM are maintained in the Policy

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Register. Public Participation

Public Participation is managed on the ward level with established ward committees in all 88 wards that ensure governance to the lowest level. Various other mechanisms have been created to ensure liaison with other stakeholders.

LEGAL COMPLIANCE

The legislative framework within which local government operates contains national and provincial legislation as well as local legislation in the form of by-laws. It also contains regulatory or directory national, provincial and local prescripts and policies. Local government functions as an independent sphere of government and the essence of its status is entrenched in the supreme legislation of our country, namely our constitution. In the execution of its functions and achievement of the GDS all stakeholders, and specifically the EMM, must ensure that all its actions comply with National and Provincial legislation as well as ensure compliance with its own by-laws and policies

National legislation directed at local government specifically:

The EMM will adhere to, amongst others, the following principles pertaining to good governance: Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 (specifically chapter 7 dealing with local government); Local Government: Municipal Structures Act 117 of 1998; Local Government: Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000; Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act 56 of 2003; and Local Government: Municipal Property Rates Act 6 of 2004 This is National legislation that have application in the manner in which governance must take place. A few examples: Constitution of the Republic Of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 (not only the Chapter dealing with Local Government, but the whole Constitution in general);Promotion Of Access To Information Act 2 of 2000(/Sapl4); Promotion Of Administrative Justice Act 3 of 2000(/Sapl4); and Promotion Of Equality And Prevention Of Unfair Discrimination Act 4 of 2000(/Sapl4). All other National legislation has application in the functional areas of operation of the different departments of the Council. Each department must identify the legislation that is applicable to the execution of its functions. Examples: National Health Act 61 of 2003; Housing Act 107 of 1997; Electricity Act 41 of 1987; South African Police Service Act 68 of 1995; and National Water Act 36 of 1998. The Rationalisation of Local Government Affairs Act, 10 of 1998. National and Provincial Regulations: Regulations that are promulgated under National and Provincial Legislation is a part of such legislation and must be complied with to the same extent. A more comprehensive list of applicable legislation is available on request. Ekurhuleni Legislation: These are all the by-laws of Ekurhuleni that control the relationship with the inhabitants of Ekurhuleni. Each department must ensure that the by-laws that control its functions in relation to the inhabitants of Ekurhuleni, are regularly updated and adhered to. Long term financial sustainability: The long-term financial sustainability of the Metro must be ensured by applying sound financial principles. Multi-year budgeting is one of the methods that must be applied. The funding of future year capital budgets, as well as the impact of the capital budgets on future year operating budgets, must be determined for the medium to long term. Departments are to budget for their projects through project cycles, being the feasibility study, planning and design and implementation phases in different financial years, unless the project planning and implementation can be completed within a twelve-month period. Feasibility studies, general planning and master plans are to be funded from the operating budget. Only plans that can be linked directly to a specific asset can be funded from the capital budget. Feasibility studies must be conducted to ensure that all programmes and projects embarked upon do not negatively affect the future financial sustainability of the Metro.

National legislation directed at standards of Governance:

National legislation of general application:

Provincial legislation:

FINANCIAL PRINCIPLES

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Revenue Enhancement: Revenue Enhancement relates to actions taken to: - Expand the revenue base; - Increase collections; - Reduce costs; and - Create an environment which enhances growth, development and service delivery. Increased municipal income is a prerequisite for the effective implementation of the GDS, and the EMM will have to formulate and implement a comprehensive strategy pertaining to revenue enhancement and protection. Treasury Management: The cash resources of the Metro must be managed not only in the short term, but also in the medium to long term. The main components to consider are the following: - Long term financing strategy; - Investment Strategy; and - Management of Daily Cash. Resource allocation using a balanced approach: Resource allocation must support the GDS focus areas. There must be a balance between investment in new infrastructure and maintenance of existing assets. Operating expenditure must be limited to income that can be realistically collected. Furthermore, the allocation of funds for the capital budget must be allocated between physical services (municipal infrastructure), social services, city development services and corporate services in an equitable manner to ensure that a balanced environment is created. Maintaining affordable tariffs with appropriate policies addressing the poor: Maintaining affordable tariffs will contribute to the economic development of the Metro by attracting investment. Policies must adequately address provision of free basic services to all, and in addition to the free basic services, support to the indigents with regards to other services. Sound financial practices in line with legislation (e.g. Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA), Local Government Systems Act, etc.). All financial policies must support National legislation. Roles and Responsibilities, delegations, and so on must be addressed. Supply Chain Management to support national and local priorities and to be in line with applicable legislation and policies. Policies must be in line with National legislation. Furthermore, the following must be addressed in the supply chain management process: • Broad Based Black Economic Empowerment; • Promotion of SMMEs; and • Utilisation of entities within the borders of the EMM. Asset Management

The managing of the assets of the EMM must address the following: • Safeguarding of assets; • Maintenance of assets in terms of an approved maintenance programme; and • Replacement of assets in terms of an approved replacement programme. The implementation of the above must be done in a manner that will ensure the sustainable

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HUMAN RESOURCES PRINCIPLES

delivery of municipal services. • The total cost to company value of the human resource budget should not exceed 30% of the total operational budget of the EMM; • The human resource planning of the EMM should be aligned with and supported by career and succession programmes; • Employment equity and workplace transformation will be promoted as pivotal in all human resource planning and activities; • The furtherance of harmonious employee and organised labour relations through proper communication and consultation in terms of the relevant legislation; • Organisational structures and practices must be aligned to and supportive of departmental IDPs and service delivery priorities; and • The workplace skills plan should be needs driven and aligned to training and development priorities. Human resource management within the EMM is guided by the following principles: • The total cost to company value of the human resource budget should not exceed 30% of the total operational budget of the EMM; • The human resource planning of the EMM should be aligned with and supported by career and succession programmes; • Employment equity and workplace transformation will be promoted as pivotal in all human resource planning and activities; • The furtherance of harmonious employee and organized labour relations through proper communication and consultation in terms of the relevant legislation; • Organizational structures and practices must be aligned to and supportive of departmental IDPs and service delivery priorities; and • The workplace skills plan should be needs driven and aligned to training and development priorities.

ICT PRINCIPLES General Principles

The following principles will guide the deployment of technology within the EMM: • The Master System Plan will be aligned with the GDS and the IDP; • Sharing of technology will be encouraged; • Alignment with national policies will be ensured; • Citizens access to services via technology must be fostered; • Access to Information Act will be supported; • Information security and governance will be motivated at all times; • Quick return on investment for ICT expenditure will be ensured; • Relationships with Shared Service Centres around Gauteng and other government entities will be fostered; and • Changing technology will be incorporated while ensuring no fruitless expenditure. Technology Principles • Technology investments should improve service delivery and/or staff effectiveness; • Information technology purchases will conform to EMM technology standards; • Technology should be shared to the greatest extent possible; •The technology products we acquire should err on the side of usefulness to our workers or customers rather than their attractiveness to technical specialists; and • The technology products we acquire should err on the side of simplicity –for our employees and customers to use, and for our ICT staff to support.

Data Principles

Our corporate and local governmental data must be current, accurate, easily accessible, and secure from unauthorized access and accidental loss; • Enterprise data will be accurately captured one time and as close to its source as possible. It should be printed only when necessary;

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• Our enterprise or local governmental data will be catalogued, named and defined, and linked/shared so that data from any function, unit, or individual will be available, subject to the restrictions of confidentiality, to any user who can demonstrate a need for it; and • All data which is stored in a machine readable form within departments shall be classified into one of the following categories for management purposes: Enterprise Data (data that multiple departments within our EMM may need to conduct their business), Departmental Data (data that multiple individuals or groups within a department may need to conduct their business), and Personal Data (data of interest only to that individual). • Sharing: There are certain business applications and technologies that are common across divisions-inventory, budgeting, accounting, billing systems and so on. These should be commonly developed and shared among departments. Access to these systems will be provided on a ‘local’ level so as to avoid redundant effort by our staff and our customers; • Buy versus build: Where possible, the EMM will purchase pre-packaged, ‘off the-shelf’ software applications rather than building systems from scratch. Customization of prepackaged software should, to the greatest extent possible, be minimized in order to reduce costs; • Minimise complexity and leverage the proficiency of our people by selecting, promoting, and supporting a limited number of (translatable/convertible)products for common commercial applications (like word processing, spreadsheets, databases, e-mail); and • We will encourage and invest in applications that reduce the cost to corporate citizens and individuals doing business with the EMM. • We will design information and communication systems that provide our customers a single point of entry into our organisation so they can deal with us simply and predictably.

People Principles

Organisation Principles

CUSTOMER CARE AREAS AND CUSTOMER CARE CENTRES GDS IMPLEMENTATION MECHANISM

• Employees are such an important asset that they will receive the training necessary to achieve proficiency in the use of technology or information systems. No investment will be made in technology without a parallel investment in training so our people can use that technology effectively. • Recruitment and retention: The EMM recognizes the value of our ICT support staff. We will recruit and retain qualified information technology professionals by offering competitive compensation, appropriate classifications, continuous technical education programs and project management training. • Our Information and Communication Technology Advisory Panel (ICTAP) sets the corporate agenda for information, communication and technology management, and recommends priorities and resources for accomplishing the EMM’s technology and information management business. Through the creation of Customer Care Areas and Customer Care Centres, government will provide integrated services and information to communities and ensure that at all times the principles of Batho Pele will be adhered to. Ward Councillors and line departments will also be put in a much better position to deal with service deliver challenges. This process is currently being rolled out. The implementation of the GDS agenda will take place through the IDP. The objectives and KPI targets in the IDP is aligned with the GDS 5 year milestones.

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3.3 GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE LOCAL ECONOMY Ekurhuleni is spread over 15.6% of Gauteng’s land mass, houses 5.4% of the country’s population, and 29% of Gauteng’s population. Migration into the area is a key challenge. This is visible in the number of informal settlements and informal trading activity. The national census records 825 990 households; this is likely to increase when taking migration into account. The area is exceptionally densely populated (987 people per square km) when compared with both Gauteng (535 people per square km) and the national economy (39 people per square km). The average annual population growth rate within the metro was 1.8% over the period 1996 to 2005. This exceeds both the national and Gauteng growth figures for this period. Ekurhuleni has a resident population of approximately 2.6 million people, of which 52.7% is economically active. One in every five people employed in the formal economy in Gauteng works in Ekurhuleni. The area contributes approximately 7.7% to national production and has a share of approximately 7.76% of national employment. Over the period 1996 to 2005, Ekurhuleni’s economy grew by an estimated average of 3% per annum. Ekurhuleni contributes approximately 21% to the total economic output of the Gauteng province. The Annual Gross Value Add (GVA) for 2005 is 4.8%. Ekurhuleni key comparative statistics1 Key Statistics (2005 estimates) Geographic size of the region (sq km) Population Population density (number of people per sq km) Economically active population (as % of total population) Number of households Average household income (Rand, current prices) Annual per capita income (Rand, current prices) Gini coefficient Formal sector employment estimates Informal sector employment estimates Unemployment rate (expanded definition) Percentage of people in poverty Poverty gap (R millions) Human development index (HDI) Index of Buying Power (IBP) Total economic output in 2005 (R millions at current prices) Share of economic output (GVA % of SA in current prices) Total economic output in 2005 (R millions at constant 2000 prices) Share of economic output (GVA % of SA in constant 2000 prices) Economic growth performance 1996-2005 (GVA % growth pa constant 2000 prices)

1

Ekurhuleni 2,642 2,607,491 986.90 52.7% 825,990 106,632 33,779 0.58 729,219 106,578 37.8% 28.1% 1,172 0.68 0.08 103,716,144

Gauteng National 16,975 1,221,246 9,089,337 47,810,798 535.45 39.15 53.5% 39.6% 2,859,567 12,705,565 142,392 86,360 44,798 22,950 0.59 0.65 3,361,061 9,392,253 458,182 2,162,574 33.0% 39.0% 27.5% 47.0% 3,998 37,646 0.71 0.60 0.35 1.00 505,441,171 1,352,951,208

7.7% 76,964,732

37.4% 100.0% 377,976,707 1,009,577,882

7.6% 3.2%

37.4% 4.1%

100.0% 3.3%

Source: All the tables and graphs are acknowledged to Specialised Development Solutions (SDS) Calculations Version 0107

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Information used to derive economic activity estimates are in most cases reported by company head offices. Many manufacturing and warehousing operations have head offices in the Johannesburg and other metro areas, while the production plants and warehouses are located in Ekurhuleni. This may imply that some of the estimates obtained for Ekurhuleni may be on the conservative side. In 2005, economic output in Ekurhuleni came to R76.9 billion (in constant 2000 prices), contributing close to 8% of total production in South Africa and a fifth of Gauteng’s total production.

Average annual GVA growth (Constant 2000 Prices) YEAR 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Ekurhuleni

National Total 2.2% -8.2% 0.6% 11.0% 5.5% 5.8% 4.0% 4.5% 4.8%

Gauteng 2.6% 0.7% 2.7% 4.4% 2.9% 3.8% 3.0% 4.4% 4.9%

1.5% 1.2% 2.9% 5.9% 5.4% 5.7% 4.0% 4.7% 5.3%

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Ekurhuleni GVA growth trend 1997 to 2005

Ekurhuleni GVA growth trend (1997-2005) 12%

Ekurhuleni 10% 8%

National Total Gauteng

6%

Growth (%)

4% 2% 0% -2% -4% -6% -8% -10% 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Over the period 1997 to 2005 the economy of Ekurhuleni registered steady growth following a slump in 1998 and 1999. From the graph above it is evident that the growth trend over this period was quite volatile – reaching both lows of –8.3% and highs of +10.5% over the 9-year window. The high growth in 2001 and 2002 was mainly due to the exchange rate movements of the South African rand and its effect on mining and related industries. Construction, transport, trade and financial services also benefited from the depreciation of the rand and contributed to the exceptional growth over this period. (See table below). The opposite holds true for 2003, when local currency strengths resulted in a slowdown of growth in the various economic sectors. This point serves to illustrate that the economy of Ekurhuleni is relatively sensitive to exchange rate movements.

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Mining sector GVA growth trend 14% 12%

Ekurhuleni National Total

10%

Gauteng 8% 6%

Growth (%)

4% 2% 0% -2% -4% -6% -8% -10% -12% -14% 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Mining has a life-cycle which is close to an end in the region. Of the three main mining operations in the region, one has already closed, and the remaining two have declared closure. The mines in Ekurhuleni are therefore marginal mines. The GVA trend depicts the decline in mining activity. Although prospecting licences have been granted for mining activity in the region, these are not likely to improve the trend.

However, in view of the recent changes in mining legislation regarding the importance of realising the economic wealth of natural resources, it is suggested that this trend could be reversed with a possible marginal increase in the GVA contribution in the future.

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Construction sector GVA growth trend 16% 14%

Ekurhuleni

12%

National Total

10%

Gauteng

8% 6% 4% 2% 0% Growth (%) -2% -4% -6% -8% -10% -12% -14% -16% -18% -20% -22% 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

While the improvement in construction can be attributed to depreciation of the rand during 2001 and 2002, the positive outlook in the economy linked to government investment in infrastructure, in particular the massive housing development programme, roads and transport upgrading, as well as the improvements to stadia in the region, will have a small impact on the trend in the years to come. Local government investment, coupled with private developer investments in low-, middle- and high-income residential property developments, will also add to this trend. A key issue for the local budget is the bulk infrastructure contributions that need to be made for such developments. The expansion of the OR Tambo International Airport will also impact on the GVA trend in construction in the near future. The expansion project, estimated at R3.5 billion for a second multi-story parking area, is scheduled for completion in 2007. In addition, there will be a redesign and expansion of the international departures concourse. By 2009, a central passenger-processing unit for both domestic and international passengers will be completed. To increase airside capacity, nine new aircraft stands will be built,as well as a new international pier development. These are scheduled for finalisation before the World Cup in 2010. Prices and inputs for this sector could escalate if the demand for raw materials increases and adequate project planning is not carried out. In addition, delays in zoning, rezoning, land use permissions, EIAs and passing of building plans could also lead to increasing costs.

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Electricity sector GVA growth trend 10% Ekurhuleni 8%

National Total Gauteng

6%

4%

2% Growth (%) 0%

-2% -4%

-6%

-8%

-10% 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

With respect to the electricity sector, the development of new housing adds to the number of consumers for this sector. However, there also needs to be a concomitant investment in infrastructure and ongoing maintenance. The tariff structure for electricity charges adopted for Ekurhuleni takes this into account and the recent ring-fencing project for the electricity function will assist in ensuring that the sector trend is improved. A balanced approach to having low, middle and high-income households as consumers of electricity needs to be developed to maintain a stable GVA trend for this sector. The electricity sector is dependent on inputs from the mining sector. Alternative inputs for energy sources for the longer-range future must be considered. The upgrade and modernisation of the current electricity infrastructure from the national government’s AsgiSA programme is in place. This needs to filter down to local level to ensure that a robust infrastructure is in place for continued manufacturing, commercial and domestic consumption. Should new developments, such as investment in property or manufacturing, continue to ignore the current infrastructure capacity it would not be possible to improve the volatile trend in this sector.

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Trade sector GVA growth trend 16% Ekurhuleni

14%

National Total

12%

Gauteng

10% 8% 6% 4% Growth (%) 2% 0% -2% -4% -6% -8% -10% -12% 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

While the supply side of the economy has been catching up, there is still a lag on the demand side, mainly due to import competition and substitution. The prolonged currency strength has to some extent inhibited export growth.

Telecommunications is included in the transport sector, noted below. The stimulation of value-added services, and the inclusion of all within the digital community as envisaged by the Blue Umbrella project, will improve the growth trend in the transport sector.

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Transport sector GVA growth trend 18% Ekurhuleni

16%

National Total

14%

Gauteng

12% 10% 8% Growth 6% (%) 4% 2% 0% -2% -4% -6% -8% 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

The growth trend in this sector will be directly affected by the recapitalisation of the taxi industry as well as the Guatrain project. Public transport for commuters has not been fully planned for the city region. Should this be in place, the trend for this sector could substantially improve.

The services sector of the economy is the new frontier. This has a direct link to social development and longerterm sustainability. These services can be driven in a sustainable manner using the World Cup 2010 programmes as an effective link to tourism. An additional focus for new jobs in the local economy, which can be the pull factor for tourism, is the cultural industry. Local Economic Development (LED) has a strategic role in fostering economic growth. It is about encouraging economic empowerment and bringing about social transformation. The unfolding of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA), the National Spatial Development Perspective, as well as the provincial iteration of the Growth and Development Strategy is about LED being realised and aligned at a local level. Stimulating the local economy is a cross-cutting function. Service delivery of almost every department in the Municipality impacts on economic and social indicators. Service delivery is linked to growth, investment, poverty reduction, social cohesion and job creation.

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It is vital to clarify where the economic spaces for growth and development are, and how these will be developed, maintained and harnessed. The National Spatial Development Perspective and the Gauteng City Region (GCR) processes, the provincial programme to implement and realise growth and development in local economies, will help to ensure the linkages needed for balanced development and hopefully reduce the duplications that increase the value chain in development. The Metro Spatial Development Framework, the regional Macro Economic Strategy adopted in 2003, and detailed assessments of the state of industry and the regional economy have spurred a set of catalytic projects to bring about economic development. These interventions are about improving the quality of life while facilitating an environment for participation in the economy and society. The interventions in the Ekurhuleni Economic Strategy focus on the core of the region’s economy, in particular the aspects that will bring about growth and development of local economy. The comparative advantage of the locality, as well as the competitive advantage of the sectors, informs the interventions. These choices are also informed by a balanced approach to developing the local economy taking both the first and the second economy into account. The interventions in the formal economy generate the pull force needed to attract skills and labour as well as finance and investment into the region. They bring about an increase in revenue and ensure that productive activity is constantly improving its capacity to leverage national programmes and develop an international competitive edge. At another level, the interventions in the Ekurhuleni Economy Strategy serve to facilitate the implementation of the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy and sustainable development. The catalytic LED projects are about linkages between the formal developed economy and the marginalised and underdeveloped second economy. These efforts link directly to employment generation and the creation of sustainable livelihoods aimed at reducing poverty as well as increasing the economically active population. 3.4

MACRO ECONOMIC STRATEGY

In November 2002 a medium term economic sustainability plan was developed. This was informed by a regional macro economic strategy, a Local Economic Development (LED) policy adopted in May 2002 and research on the local economy. In 2003 the Implementation framework for the Ekurhuleni Economic Strategy and LED policy was adopted in response to the need to align and integrate all the economic strategic plans of the nine towns and two administrations, which constituted the Metropole. A macro economic strategy is a medium term plan and has relevance for 10 to 15 years. The macro economic strategy for Ekurhuleni considered the following: • • • • • • •

the dual nature of the economy; the dominance of the metal industry in manufacturing; unemployment and informal sector of the economy; the results of mining; protecting the high-yielding agricultural land and sensitive areas’ HIV and AIDS; and gender and the economy .

In 2005 a process to bring about additional integration was embarked upon, and an Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy 2025 was adopted. The following agenda issues are contained in the Economic Focus Area of the Ekurhuleni GDS 2025: •

A diversified local economy able to meet local needs, support sustainable development and adapt to changes in accordance with global demands and shifts.

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• • • • •

Labour Absorption and Job Creation – unemployment to be reduced by half in 2014 and by half again in 2025, based on 2004 unemployment figures. A skilled community exhibiting capabilities in self-reliance, innovation and continued reskilling to meet the needs of a growing economy. To promote the economy of the region, create jobs and a safe and secure environment, by establishing a tourism destination of choice. Increased inward investment in skills and technology, property and sustainable development. Broad Based Economic Transformation - an inclusive wealth-generating economy.

The Social Focus Area in the Ekurhuleni Growth and Development strategy has an impact on the economy and contains the follow agenda for 2025: • • • • •

In line with the national objective, the aim is to halve poverty in the next 10 years up to 2015, and to halve it again in the following 10 years, up to 2025. All people in Ekurhuleni to be housed in integrated and functional sustainable human settlements. Equitable health care and facilities across all sectors of society – substantially reduced rates of poverty– related disease. A high level of safety and security – a drastically reduced crime rate. Ekurhuleni to have world-class parks, sports and recreational facilities.

The Physical Focus Area in the Ekurhuleni Growth and Development strategy is the backbone and infrastructure needed to develop the local economy. The following are agenda issues to be realised by 2025: • • • • • • •

An integrated and equitable city. High quality, integrated and well-maintained transportation infrastructure, integrated public transport systems, ensuring a high degree of mobility and choices for commuters. High quality and well-maintained services, equitable services throughout the urban areas. A substantial increase in the general quality of the environment. A well-developed and vibrant core economic area, which imparts a unique character and identity to Ekurhuleni. Functional, sustainable, and attractive urban areas. Productive and resourceful application of ICT.

Ekurhuleni’s economy and strength lie in the comparative and competitive advantage of the manufacturing sector. This is supported by a skilled workforce, accommodated close to the manufacturing base. The availability of raw material and good transport linkages are the added advantage. Political and economic stability are two sides of the same coin. The health and stability of the one facilitates health and stability in the other. Confidence in the economy is directly impacted by political action. Despite the interconnectedness between economic and political stability, the local government’s ability to act in the economic arena is limited. For example, local government does not have a direct mandate to conduct trade promotion and regulate industry. Local government does, however, play a crucial role in the provincial and national economies by providing core infrastructure and services (i.e. water, electricity, and refuse removal) that no other level of government provides. Thus, the political mandate of local government is to facilitate the growth of the economy at local level by providing the services without which the economy would grind to a halt. One of the requirements of the Municipality is to provide for all citizens equally (i.e. residents, businesses, and government departments). At the same time, the Municipality’s core business is provision of basic services, which is where it derives the majority of its income (the other income-generating area of the municipality is property

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rating). Thus, the real disposable income level of households is of deep significance as the income to the Metro is dependent on people being able to afford services. Reflecting global economic trends, many have been forced out of the formal economy and into poverty. Nearly one third of Ekurhuleni’s population lives in poverty, one in four people is unemployed, and the region is 99% urbanised. These indicators highlight the importance of addressing poverty for Ekurhuleni’s long-term economic sustainability. The local economic development policy framework, therefore, addresses interventions to close this poverty gap, while the economic strategy points to how the Metro could organise itself and all its services to realise improved service delivery and capacitation in the economy. The Gini-coefficient of the area is 0.58, which indicates an unequal distribution of wealth. Specific plans on smallscale mining, restructuring of the Springs Fresh Produce Market, as well as developing agriculture for export, are in the process of being launched to ensure black economic empowerment and greater spread of wealth in the economy. These initiatives will also ensure the creation of sustainable jobs. The Human Development Index of Ekurhuleni is 0.68, which indicates a dire need to increase the human capacity and ensure conducive environmental conditions to contribute to sustainable development. The strength of Ekurhuleni’s economy is its well-developed infrastructure and manufacturing base. The industrial policy options to grow the economy need to be implemented through a co-ordinated programme with national, provincial and local government working together with business and labour. The market-led economy will continue to grow, but there is a dire need to ensure that the Municipality reconfigures itself to ensure equitable economic growth and long-term sustainability. Thus, local government must restructure itself to play the leading role in facilitating the implementation of national programs on economic development, in particular broad based economic empowerment, cooperative forms of ownership, and the economic empowerment of women. Economic development plays a crucial role in creating a prosperous, equitable, stable and democratic society. The overall national vision of economic development is one of decent work and living standards for all in the context of qualitative improved equality in ownership, skills and access to opportunities. To achieve this, municipalities must work to:  stimulate local production and commerce, including home industries;  ensure intergovernmental linkages to national and provincial programmes and strategies;  utilise institutional arrangements that stimulate community initiatives and broaden ownership, including through cooperatives;  address apartheid spatial planning that undermines local economic development; and  deliver municipal services through collective community initiatives and enterprises. To guide economic and social development at local level, the LED policy framework sets the broad parameters for economic empowerment and transformation to be realised. The policy thrusts are not only for the LED Department to carry out, but are relevant for all components of the municipal institution. The policy thrusts state the national policy guideline of the RDP and are followed by specific objectives and local inventions. The LED policy framework has 10 policy thrusts namely: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Local production for local need A cooperative movement to represent community-based interventions in the local economy A skills development network Develop and sustain urban and commercial agriculture to build food security Promote Waste Recycling and Reusable Energy

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6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Build Local Development Capital Ensure Participatory and Integrated Planning Maintain Linkages with the Industrial base Facilitate and Grow SMMEs Affirm Local Procurement

3.4.1 Strategic Interventions To realise the economic strategy, and to ensure sustainable development, a number of key interventions are needed. These strategic interventions are aimed at contributing to the growth of all the economic sectors and are noted in the sections below. The main focus of all the interventions is to provide a platform for participation in the economy, taking the needs of small and micro enterprises, as well as established businesses and cooperatives,into account. The goal is to diversify the economy by providing for local needs and also attempt to increase export revenue and reverse the trade deficit, as well as provide for ownership opportunities for black people, women and the poor. The core components of the economic strategy are: 3.4.1.1 Administered Pricing and Tariffs This refers to the charges levied for services by the Municipality. Overall inflation targets make recovery from tariffs vulnerable. Standards on levels of services also affect the setting of tariffs, as delivery to under-serviced areas increases initial costs. Affordability of service levies would, therefore, be the key to ensuring an increased level of payment. The redistributive mechanism, whereby established areas subsidise under-serviced areas, is one way of ensuring that service levies are not prohibitive in under-serviced areas, as these areas are also economically deprived. A sliding scale to accommodate the economically deprived areas needs to be considered, alongside a breakdown of the cost of maintenance and upgrading where needed. In addition, the quality of product or service needs to be factored into the cost determination. With respect to refuse and electricity, a link to waste recycling and renewable energy would help ensure that the basic quality of life for all is set, and that all citizens fall within a basic social security net of affordable services. Property rates are the key source of revenue for local authorities. There should be a sliding scale for rating, based on the value of property as well as land usage. This would be in keeping with the intention of the Local Government Municipal Property Rates Act no 6 2004 to enhance certainty, uniformity as well as simplicity, and would take into account historical imbalances as well as the rates burden on the poor. When the no rating exclusion is applied, it should be based on subsistence living and incomes, subsistence plots and shack dwellings, as well as people in casual jobs and those unemployed. 3.4.1.2 Ring fencing of revenue The streams of revenue from electricity, water, sewage and refuse removal need to be ring fenced to ensure that surpluses are used to improve the reach and range of these services. 3.4.1.3 Developing and sustaining economic sectors Growth and development can be achieved through stimulating the various sectors of the economy. While the sector development plans are developed and managed by the national government, the impact of the sectors occurs at local level. Protection of certain industries, in the areas of trade and investment, helps these industries to grow and be competitive. The focus at the local level is to link the realisation of national programmes for the various sectors of the economy. What follows hereunder is a discussion of the comparative and competitive advantage to be leveraged linked to the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors of the economy. Agriculture - Primary

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To ensure economic growth and stability a spread of all economic sectors in the regional economy is essential, with the primary sector, agriculture, firmly in place to build food security. Ekurhuleni has the high-yielding agricultural land of Gauteng located within its jurisdiction. Strategic Interventions on agriculture are backed up by an agricultural strategy adopted by the Council. A process to link into the agricultural development programme and promote food security through a provincial committee is also a part of this intervention. Organic food production and aquaculture are key components to building food security and ensuring sustainable development. These can be linked to food gardens and greening the region, but more importantly are niche productive activities for markets such as retailing and catering in hotels and restaurants. Value added processes by way of processing and packaging -before marketing and export - are considerations for the development of the agricultural sector with side stteam linkages to manufacturing, trade and services. Restructuring of local state assets for greater efficiencies and black economic empowerment to be realised The marketing of agricultural products in South Africa was regulated until 1994 through commodity boards. Currently marketing services are deregulated and in the hands of the private sector. The process to restructure the Fresh Produce Market has unfolded and is being considered in the institutional review of the Municipality. Mining - Primary The mining sector, although in decline, is being stimulated to contribute to the economy through promotion of artisanal and small-scale mining. The obligations linked to mining licences bring about opportunities to develop upstream, downstream and side stream linkages into the economy, thus impacting on the development of the manufacturing sector. In addition, taking the life cycle of mining into account, the land care work that arises in mining rehabilitation work is linked to the agricultural sector. The new mining legislation in the form of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act (Act 28 of 2002) (MPRDA) promotes the importance of realising direct and indirect economic, social and environmental benefits from the mining of natural mineral resources. In terms of the MPRDA and its associated regulations, mining and quarrying companies are legally obliged to prepare a Social and Labour Plan (S&LP) which has to be closely integrated with the local municipal IDP.The new legislation therefore provides an opportunity for stronger and more beneficial relationships and partnerships to be established between the mining and quarrying companies and the municipality. It will be important for Ekurhuleni to address the integration of the Social and Labour Plan with the IDP to realise the most value, impact and contribution to many of the IDP Focus Areas and their related strategic objectives, programmes and actions. Strategic Interventions on Mining is facilitated through the establishment of a Mining Forum and through Job Creation projects to clean up the environment This intervention is about an approach to developing profitable business opportunities through recovering gold and other materials in the surface mine residue deposits. The informal and illegal, small-scale mining ventures recovering material from the mining residue deposits have been capacitated through a partnership with Department of Mineral and Energy. Turning this informal, illegal activity into a formal, legal activity facilitates poverty alleviation. With respect to state-owned land and derelict mines, this programme also provides the opportunity for creating a new revenue stream for the Metropolitan Municipality linked to leasing of land. The introduced legislation provides the opportunity for ownership of minerals and the right to mine to be distributed among the historically disadvantaged people, and women in particular, through the Mining Charter and business channels. Manufacturing and Construction - Secondary

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Manufacturing, as a key strength of the regional economy, needs to be sustained. The skills in this sector should be harnessed to produce low-value finished material that generates spin-offs in other sectors, such as construction of houses. A target for value added beneficiation and downstream linkages is vital. The ICT sector has the potential to absorb and reskill labour, as well as bring in new aspects to infrastructure such as optic fibre and bandwidth. These are key to improved global trade as well as IT-enabled distribution and production The construction sector needs to be a trigger in the economy, whether it is in the building of infrastructure or housing. The housing policy has suggested that cooperative ventures be used in housing construction and this could be organised to sustain economic long-term prospects for local people. Material supply chains need to be localised and job creation in construction must also be linked to ongoing services in maintenance work such as plumbing, electrical work, woodwork and light manufacturing. The provision and maintenance of infrastructure, such as road and storm water drainage, links directly to the construction sector of the economy. 3.4.1.4 Strategic Interventions: Support and facilitate the sustainability of the manufacturing sector to grow and be competitive This intervention tackles the crucial problem of the increasing rate of unemployment and inequality in manufacturing in the Ekurhuleni region. The main role of local government in terms of facilitating industrial development is to: • • •



engage with industry to achieve its developmental objectives by anticipating interventions that industry would make, gather information, analyse the strategic path of manufacturing, and coordinate activities and initiatives of institutions engaged in industrial development (e.g., employment equity and skills development).

Industrial development occurs within local, national, and global contexts and all of these impact on the growth path of the Metropolitan area. Viable approaches to industrial development must see the multiple levels on which it occurs. The issue of import parity pricing and other regulatory mechanisms are national programmes, with implications at a local level. Facilitation and communications linked to this is one role that the municipality can play. Upgrade and revitalisation of commercial areas for exchange of commodities The economic infrastructure of the townships in the Metropolitan region requires key interventions, holistic models and sustainable plans. These are needed more specifically to consolidate apartheid’s legacy of white Commercial Business Districts (CBDs) and black township informal economies into one sustainable urban area. This has to take into account issues of small and micro business development, informal trading, cooperative forms of business and production and the necessary economic infrastructure for economic sustainability Economic development in South Africa’s transition poses many challenges. Deconstructing the concept of local economic development (i.e. stimulating local economy versus job creation), redefining the terms ‘formal’ and ‘informal’ economies, and developing a role for local government institutions in local economic development, are among the key challenges. A programme to consider an upgrade plan linked to placement of street furniture, upgrading of CBDs in areas where natural trading occurs, as well as urban renewal, has been embarked on. This is linked to small business development in the services and retail sectors, and to the efforts of large retailers to development new markets. Skills Development for growing the economy and ensuring sustainable development The skills capacity of a population is a key determinant of human development. With rapid changes in the production process the reskilling of the labour for economic growth and stability has become a paramount issue. The consolidation and co-ordination of all government efforts on skills development as well as further education and training at the local level is the core of this intervention.

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Services - Tertiary The services sector of the economy must and should respond to HIV and AIDS and care work as well as child-care and early childhood education. These aspects have a direct link to social development and longer-term sustainability. In the services sector a challenge also exists around commercialisation of activities such as cleaning, laundry,catering and other domestic activbities. These can be important linkages into the tourism as well as hotel and conferencing industries. Allied to the tourism industry are the cultural and sports industries. Both have the potential to create new jobs and utilise the natural environment, heritage and history of the region. The cultural industry includes film, performing arts as well as crafts Finance - Tertiary The finance sector of the regional economy needs to consider access to finance for the unbankable, as well as saving credit unions. A savings culture among all will help ensure an adequate level of payment for services and a growth path in the regional economy. It will also help to short-circuit the debt trap, in which the poor find themselves. Electricity and Water Services – Public Sector Electricity and water services are state-lead sectors of the economy. They must be managed to ensure efficient delivery and ensure the reach and range is to all citizens within levels of affordability. It is likely that a major restructuring of the working entities would need to be effected to ensure improved service delivery as well as capital replacement of infrastructure. 3.4.1.5 Development Zones Development zones need to cover the entire region to ensure that there is no area left impoverished. Corridors and nodes for development need to be considered to reverse past planning and to bring about economic development. In order to stimulate the economy, such initiatives must have the following core aspects: transport linkages, residential development, businesses for the production and exchange of goods as well as government presence for service delivery. Spatial development initiatives need to have a mix of economic sectors with a range from production to services to ensure economic sustainability and diversification as well as longer-term job and wealth generation. Industrial development zones must be linked to downstream beneficiation and export, and must support the overall industrial strategy. 3.4.1.6 Harnessing Conditional Grants To grow the sectors of the economy it is necessary to use conditional grants for infrastructure, public works (road development and maintenance; provision of electricity, water and sanitation, housing and amenities), education (skills development, adult literacy and child education), transport for mobility and tourism development. These should not be dropped into the local economy without a link to a specific local project and programme, as this would impact on the financial sustainability of the Municipality. A life cycle cost/benefit analysis must be conducted for all such initiatives. 3.4.1.7 Mainstream the informal sector and women into the formal economy A key thrust to economic regeneration is the formalisation of informal businesses, in order to move them out of subsistence survival to production of adequate surpluses. The active involvement of women in the productive economy is also an aspect of growing and revitalising the economy. The need to support women in businesses in all sectors of the economy is vital. A local network of women entrepreneurs has been facilitated, under the leadership of the women’s caucus.

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3.4.1.8 Procurement Procurement needs to be local and in support of economic growth and sustainable development. A set target ensuring that 20% of all procurement is from start-up businesses, including cooperatives, would provide an incentive to ensure that informal businesses are formalised and become more efficient. Targets with respect to BEE have also been set. The area of buying by any municipality is often riddled with corruption, which is a deterrent to business confidence and growth in the economy. Thus a clearly-defined process and programme to manage municipal procurement is needed. The introduction of a supply chain management process assists with this challenge. The reuse of rubber, in the form of tyre crumbs in tar for roads, as well as the procurement of eco-friendly goods and products, should take place to ensure sustainable economic development. 3.4.1.9 Service levels to business and industry linked to retention plans The quality of services provided to business and industry is directly linked to the willingness to remain in the region. With the new approaches to production and competitive advantages in many other areas, relocation is an attractive prospect for many industries and businesses. With regard to service level, the provision of quality services needs to be linked to a retention plan. 3.4.1.10 Register of businesses - formal and informal This is vital to: • • • • • 3.4.2

Ensure that there is adequate provision made with respect to services for businesses and industry; Support business and industry to continue to create and retain jobs; Keep track of the growth in the different sectors of the regional economy; Monitor start-up and emerging businesses; Support the move of informal businesses into the formal economy. Drivers of the strategy

A strategy is driven through push and pull factors. The main aspect of any strategy is the overall co-ordination and implementation. Key Drivers of the Strategy are: 3.4.2.1 Cooperative governance • • •

Political buy-in and support; Administrative co-ordination and cooperation; A collective response by all departments and political actors.

3.4.2.2 Partnership • • •

Sectoral forums with business and communities; Grow the cooperative sector; Allow the private sector to conduct its business.

3.4.2.3 Rapid responsiveness to innovation and investment • • •

Service delivery linked to total quality management and just-in-time processing; Reduction of unnecessary delays in administrative processes; Project management of investment initiatives.

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3.4.2.4 Sound intergovernmental relations • • • 3.4.3

Involvement of all spheres of government and with other municipalities reducing competition and promoting cooperation; Presenting and defending national and provincial policies and strategies of government; Speaking with one voice as government and working towards a common goal. Specific options and plans linked to the economic strategy are:

3.4.3.1 Supporting the sustainability of the manufacturing sector to grow and be competitive: In this respect there is a local Industrial Policy that guides the interventions being facilitated. It must be noted that trade and investment, incentives and protection of industries are not municipal competences. Therefore the work that needs to be carried out is more an intergovernmental relations function. 3.4.3.2 Ongoing evaluation of existing revenue streams to determine whether they contribute to local economic sustainability and the potential to grow them: In this respect, property matters (which falls under the Corporate and Legal Department), waste management, (under the Environmental Development Department) water management, (one of the functions of the Infrastructure Department), Roads, Outdoor Advertising and Transport (managed by the Infrastructure Department) are key focus areas. Revenue streams cannot be underestimated, as they are key to the Municipality’s solvency. One of the legacies of apartheid is the lack of economic resources in certain areas, a problem which continues to plague local governments. While providing basic public transport is an important issue to be addressed, another issue is whether the Municipality generates revenue from this - given the fact that transport (road, rail, and air) in South Africa is privatised. 3.4.3.3 Linkages of municipal procurement to the local economy: Municipal buying by is often riddled with corruption, which is a deterrent to business confidence and growth in the economy. The MFMA considers ethics and linkages into the economy to support the alignment of procurement and economic development. The supply chain regulations assist to provide a base of data from which trends can be analysed. 3.4.3.4 Upgrade and revitalisation of commercial areas for exchange of commodities: This intervention seeks to address the economic infrastructure of the townships in the Metropolitan region. More specifically it delves into how to consolidate apartheid’s legacy of white CBDs and black township informal economies into one sustainable urban area. Economic Infrastructure also considers issues of SMME development, informal trading, and the necessary economic infrastructure for economic sustainability. Challenges include urban renewal and the need to consolidate the nine towns into one Metropolitan area. Planning, land use management and controls on land usage, are located in the City Development Department, while the Environmental Development Department attends to the maintenance of parks, lakes and cemeteries. The Sport Recreation Arts and Culture Department oversees sports grounds and facilities, libraries and information services as well as culture and heritage work. The maintenance of roads, pavements and building inspections are the responsibility of the Infrastructure Department; and the cleaning of the area, pollution control and health inspections are the responsibility of the Environmental Development Department. Safety and security matters are dealt with by the Metro Police. 3.4.3.5 Taking cognisance of environmental degradation and pressures in the economy: This option is about mainstreaming the environment within a holistic approach, as a key principle of the LED policy. The impact of environmental degradation is costly to the economy. For example, many hazardous substances in the ground are the result of industrial and mining processes and negatively affect economic growth. It is therefore necessary to champion an environmental management strategy that assists economic growth. Environmental problems, including contaminated land, face the Ekurhuleni

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region. An integrated approach to understanding and addressing environmental issues and water management is necessary. Thus, economic, social, political, and environmental aspects must simultaneously be considered in developing a holistic approach to development. At the same time, certain high-risk problems (e.g., buildings built on sink holes) must be separated out in terms of immediate solutions. The dangers associated with the high concentrations of dolomite in the region, which cause sink holes, must be addressed. 3.4.3.6 Job Creation and cleaning up the environment: This option is specifically focused on turning informal, illegal activity into formal, legal activity that facilitates poverty alleviation. It also considers the unlocking of land for development. Recycling of waste would also mean less volume for landfill sites. This work in the main is carried out by the Environment Development Department. 3.4.3.7 Restructuring of local state assets for greater efficiencies and the realisation of black economic empowerment: In this option. the programme commences with the Fresh Produce Market of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, which provides a marketing service to the agricultural sector. The key deliverables are employment equity, the broadening of the base of agents and suppliers, increasing access to economic opportunities for local people, restructuring the ownership of the market to ensure that the Municipality derives revenue from the investment in the property, and encouraging the agricultural sector in the region to play a decisive role in the operation of the market. In 2005 the Fresh Produce Market was transferred to LED. It was previously under the Finance Department. An institutional review was undertaken and complete ring fencing of the function and its location, as a business unit, is in progress. 3.4.3.8 Wealth creation projects and increasing agricultural exports: This fits in with the provincial strategy to make the best possible use of the richest agricultural soil in Gauteng as well as exploit the facilities of Rand Airport, “city-deep” and the ORTIA. It is about developing agricultural exports (flower growing and medicinal herbs) and stimulating food production. 3.4.3.9 Facilitating child care facilities: Childcare and early childhood development are essential to the reproduction of the labour force. With HIV and AIDS the issue of child care and childhood development is fast becoming a community responsibility. An initial exploration into the role of local government in addressing this new challenge has been detailed. It also poses the question of how women can be gainfully employed in areas in which they are already involved and skilled. This area of work resides with the Health and Social Development Department. 3.4.3.10 Facilitating skills development to grow the economy and achieve sustainable development: Labour market forces are outside the direct mandate of local government. However, local government can play a significant influential role in facilitating an environment where labour absorption takes place. Through leveraging the National Skills Development Strategy, linkages needed in the core and dominant industries can be effectively facilitated by local government to grow the economy and bring about a dynamic supply of labour to meet the demands of the economy. One of the most important requirements for sustainable local economic growth is an appropriately skilled local work force, which can support existing economic activity as well as attract and generate new economic activity. An equally important requirement for sustainable economic activity is a large cohort of entrepreneurs willing to start and grow businesses. Skills capacity and capability is a key determinant of human development. With rapid changes in the production process the reskilling of labour for economic growth and stability has become a paramount issue. A strategy for consolidating and co-ordinating all the government efforts on skills development, as well as further education and training at the local level, is in place and has been implemented. However the more intangible aspects of information, knowledge and broadening the base of experience still need to be considered. Greater co-ordination is needed to facilitate community education and training.

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3.4.4

Local Interventions (2000 to 2006) Ekurhuleni is popularly known as the “Gold Axis”. Mining activity developed the comparative advantage of well-developed transport linkages in Ekurhuleni. Mining also spurred the development of manufacturing. The gold axis was also the basis for workers to be organised. Ekurhuleni has become the industrial workshop and home of the industrial proletariat. The perception of better opportunities has led to increased migration into the region and a number of informal settlements have come about due to a housing shortage. With the slow down in the formal economy and manufacturing during the early 90s a number of new entrants into the region find themselves surviving in the informal sector. The key focus of LED in Ekurhuleni is an intervention to realise Growth and Development as well as a sustainable future. This is about alignment between the Integrated Manufacturing Strategy (IMS), the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Strategy (AMTS), National Skills Development Strategy and Local Economic Development (LED). Without this intervention, further loss of employment and lower labour absorption will be the likely result. Thus local strategies need to be mirrored in the national and provincial strategies. Engagement with industry, labour and business has been through a participatory approach, involving key stakeholders (including labour, national and provincial government as well as the communities) in various economic sector forums. The methodology used is to conduct research in the economy, share the analysis, and plan and execute interventions. Since 2002 meetings with various sectors have taken place. This has provided a platform to engage with local stakeholders. Each month a Mayoral Business Initiative takes place, which targets local leaders and various sectors of society. The LED Department facilitates regular economic sector forums on mining, agriculture, construction, manufacturing, SMMEs, skills development and cooperatives. In partnership with MINTEK, MERSETA and the DTI, and also through a cooperative agreement with University of the Witwatersrand, industry clusters have been set up for foundries, plastics and capital goods. In 2002 an industrial policy was developed. This approach helped to obtain a better understanding of the manufacturing sector in the region. A cooperative agreement with the University of the Witwatersrand assisted in obtaining expert research capability. Through this cooperative work a deeper and better understanding of the performance of local firms in the local economy has come about. This work has been shared widely with national and provincial government, and has informed government’s National Programme of Action. Over five years (2006 –2010), Transnet and Eskom will be spending R133 billion. A significant proportion of this capital expenditure will be for capital goods - electrical and non-electrical machinery, as well as transport equipment. By 2008 a new power station will be established in the country. This will mean a redevelopment of capabilities lost over the past twenty years, when there was limited State Owned Enterprise investment. Given Ekurhuleni's status as the capital goods manufacturing hub for SA - if not for Africa - this is going to result in a massive increase in demand. In the five year period 2006 to 2010, Spoornet aims to increase its freight capacity by 30%. The plans for a rapid rail link between Johannesburg, Tshwane and the ORTIA in Ekurhuleni are far advanced. This is a project of the Gauteng Province, but it is an investment of national economic significance. This initiative takes place within a larger transport development strategy for the Gauteng City Region, which is currently under final scrutiny. The overall costs to the fiscus of Gautrain will exceed R20 billion over the five years (2006-2010). Progress made on the five strategic interventions viz. manufacturing, mining, agriculture, economic infrastructure and skills development, from 2000 to 2006, is detailed hereunder: 3.4.4.1 Manufacturing Interventions The manufacturing sector of Ekurhuleni has experienced growth. Research conducted in partnership with the CSID Research Unit, based at the University of the Witwatersrand, indicates that there have been

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increased levels of investment in new machinery, higher spending on training, and improved production capabilities. These were the key factors for the growth and employment generation that came about. Local firms’ investment and training expenditures jumped in 2004 compared with the previous year. This investment in human development is closely related to the increased employment trend. The main driver has been improved domestic demand. From the firms’ survey, indications were that in 2003 firms in Ekurhuleni were spending an average of R3 700 per employee on training, while in 2004 firms spent an average of R6 232 per employee. In part this shows that the national skill development strategy is taking off, and the skills development incentive is being recognised and used. The sectors with substantial presence were identified, through research and analysis, as plastics, metal fabrication, heavy metal industry and mining equipment. These sectors are trapped into high input costs due to import parity pricing, and are subject to the fluctuations of the rand and exchange controls. The research conducted by Ekruhuleni has been taken up in the customised metal sector strategy, which was finalised by the DTI in 2006. The research indicated that the municipality must be prepared to advance the cause of businesses in the area. Two issues emerged that were within the control of the Municipality and linked to municipal services. Business expects the Municipality to provide reliable electricity and public transport for those firms wanting to increase employment by introducing three shifts instead of the current two-shift system. This would have the effect of labour absorption into the first economy and would increase employment. These aspects require an alignment of local, provincial and national plans to the electricity infrastructure and transport planning, budgeting and delivery. Organised labour has also negotiated reinstatement of workers on expansion. The current workforce is living on additional income earned from the overtime paid for two twelve-hour shifts. Any attempts to increase employment must also involve organised labour as a key stakeholder. In partnership with national government and key parastatals such as Mintek, CSIR and the MERSETA, a number of interventions are in place to boost competitiveness in the identified sectors. These interventions are the foundation for the local, national and provincial strategies on growth and development and can be viewed as triggers to growth and development. • A National Tooling Initiative The plastics industry has been brought into this programme through an industry cluster and a priority skills development programme using the skills development funds. In keeping with the need to improve productivity and build competitiveness, the DTI, together with the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Unit based at the CSIR, the Gauteng province and the LED Department, has embarked on a national tooling initiative for the plastics industry. Deliberations have been concluded at NEDLAC and implementation has commenced. Through participation in the South African Cities Network, the Metro has learnt from the successes of the pilot carried out in the Western Cape. • National Casting Technology Centre The foundry industry has been involved in an industry cluster to develop core skills needed to sustain the industry. The skills programme of the industry federation will be run from the centre. An old Denel Site, a foundry, was identified for this purpose and assessed. However, the expansion of the OR Tambo International Airport required this land. Government intervention was therefore reshaped and a network has been established to support research and development, and to make testing facilities more accessible to local producers. This initiative is a part of the customised metal sector strategy developed by the DTI. • Industry Cluster linked to Mining Capital Equipment Industry clusters on pumps and value manufacturing have been set up and skills development programmes for the industry are being considered. This work is essential to improve productivity to meet the demand for the government’s capital investment programme over the period 2006-2010. Various government departments have supported this initiative.

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• Focus on Metal Fabrication – an Incubator Programme on Base Metals An incubator programme for base metal and mineral beneficiation has been established with the support of SEDA and the province. The main private sector partners and initiators are local mining houses, Kumba Resources (now Exxaro) and the Impala Platinum Refinery. This initiative will conduct downstream beneficiation of zinc, nickel and brass. The incubator is located in the Springs industrial area and will benefit small and medium enterprises. Government support for this programme amounts to a grant of almost R9 million. • Aerospace Network In order to develop world-class practices and to be globally competitive, the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Strategy has been implemented to benefit the manufacturing base in the region. As part of this work, Ekurhuleni is a signatory to the Aerospace Network. The Aerospace Network has commenced on flagships programmes around: • • •

Casting Light Weight Metals Advanced Electronics Digital Manufacturing

3.4.4.2 Interventions linked to the life cycle of mining Ekurhuleni was the mining centre of the country. While mining developed the South African economy in past years, there is a need now to overcome the legacy of mining. Mine dumps on which unsafe and informal mining takes place, and informal settlements housing people adjacent to mine dumps, need to be rehabilitated. Project Hloekisa has been launched to help facilitate the clean-up of the mine dumps. In this process the value of the land will be unlocked. This strategic intervention is underpinned by the need to further develop and stimulate economic activity. During 2002, the municipality embarked on the development of a medium term economic and financial sustainability strategy. In this, the life cycle and sustainability of mining, its linkages and impact of the local economy, were considered. A significant portion of mining land is in private hands. Global best practice about how investments can be harnessed for a post-mining era can be replicated, with the support of companies like Anglo. Discussions are underway to try to emulate the Cornwall experience, where the WSSD’s flagship Eden Project is located. Ekurhuleni has established the first Mining forum at local government level. This is a public participation f orum, wherein the local stakeholder and government communicate with each other and find meaningful solutions that can make a significant contribution to the local economy. The rehabilitation of mining land is part of the agricultural sector and is about land care. The Ekurhuleni mining forum has encouraged owners of mining land to present plans linked to the development of property to ensure that these are in line with the SDF. In this respect the Grootvlei Mine water treatment - desalination project, Skukhuza, as well as the closures of ERGO and ERPM, have been deliberated and aligned with the key challenges facing the local economy. From October 2002 the local government and the mining houses, as well as labour, have been in ongoing discussions about the challenges posed by mining activity. In February 2003, the informal mining of mine dumps was deliberated at the Mining forum and in partnership with the Department of Mineral and Energy, a conducive environment for new entrants to participate in mining-related activity was facilitated. A small-scale mining company had been set up to work on the rehabilitation of mining land. Informal miners are current being formalised in small-scale mining and the rehabilitation of mine dumps. Technical support has been leveraged from Mintek. The Mining Qualifications Authority appointed the Mining Development Agency to conduct workshops to

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capacitate emerging miners over the past months. This has been carried out in local information centres set up by the LED department in selected libraries. With the decline in mining activity a further challenge relating to underground water in mines exists. Currently there are no definitive plans in place to unlock the value of the rich gold veins in the east rand to extend the life cycle of mining. Although mining prospecting permits have been applied for, the key issue is the cost of pumping the underground water, which will create further economic opportunities. With investment, the manufacturing of water through pumping and treatment is a reality. This water could be used for industrial and agricultural purposes thereby ensuring that potable water, a scare resource, is available for human consumption. A national project, which co-ordinates a programme relating to underground water linked to extending the life cycle of mining, has been set up. Ekurhuleni, the departments of Minerals and Energy and Water and Forestry, as well as the Geo Science Council have commenced with the development of an integrated plan. With respect to mining the Gauteng city region footprint needs to be taken into account. Mining takes place in other provinces but the refining of gold and platinum takes place in Ekurhuleni. The full value chain linked to this, including the linkages of transport and other key aspects, need to be unpacked as part of the city region. With the new mining legislation and the legislative requirement and importance of integrating the Ekurhuleni IDP with the Social and Labour Plans (S&LP) of the mining and quarrying companies, it will be important to work with the appropriate government departments, in particular the Department of Mineral and Energy, to establish the most appropriate framework and the partnership structures for ensuring the best value and opportunities for social and economic development is realised for the local communities. 3.4.4.3 Facilitating and Promoting Agriculture The establishment of the Vlakfontein-Sizanani Co-operative in 2003 illustrates our emphasis on community development and economic empowerment. The project is aimed at ensuring that the beneficiaries of land reform and land care programmes gain maximum advantage from their land. This project was able to provide 36 permanent, sustainable jobs through a cooperative form of ownership in the agricultural sector. 631ha of land is being productively used by the cooperative. It utilises agricultural methods and techniques to ensure the involvement of locals in food production. Projects of this nature allow people to work together towards their own empowerment and self-reliance. To expand this vision and to further develop the Agricultural sector in Ekurhuleni, a joint programme with the province and national government was set up in 2003. Emerging farmers have been supported to harness high yielding agricultural land. In addition the participation of women and youth in cooperative ventures has been encouraged. A total of 9 council-owned agricultural tracts, comprising just over 800ha, has been made accessible to cooperatives in Ekurhuleni. Alongside this, a programme to build food security, through supporting small food gardens and homestead gardens, is also in place. In addition, an intervention to identify, access and protect government land with high yielding agricultural potential is in place. Taking the programme to develop broad based empowerment and build food security further, the Municipality has restructured the Fresh Produce Market. The first Black agent was appointed in 2004. The diversification and expansion is aimed to make the Market more accessible to local producers and consumers. An advisory board for the Fresh Produce Market has been set up with the producers, agents and buyers providing strategic guidance to the Municipality, thereby involving key role players in the agricultural sector in local economy development.

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All high yielding agricultural land in the region has been marked out for developing the agricultural sector of the local economy.

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3.4.4.4 Economic Infrastructure interventions Revitalising Commercial Areas The national Urban Development Zone tax rebate programme has unfolded. Demarcated sections of two CBDs have been established and tax relief for landowners in these areas will be achieved in time. This is government’s key urban renewal programme. A model to regenerate the urban economy has been developed and four key aspects have been teased out, viz, transport linkages, government investment, residential development and the business sector. This model will be used in the UDZ designated areas, the existing CBDs in the various towns, as well as in the natural CBDs that have developed in townships. This model will guide the urban renewal programmes as well as the reshaping of economic activity in townships that will be redeveloped in the 20 Priority Townships programme. A key aspect of work to revitalise commercial areas is the upgrade of trading markets for micro retailers. This is being carried out in partnership with the private sector and parastatals. The Informal Sector The LED focus on the informal sector is linked to mainstreaming the sector to move from survival activities to sustainable activities where possible. This is more likely to occur through up-skilling programmes in conjunction with the Department of Labour. Work with the informal shebeens in the region, by way of information and advice, has also been facilitated. New applications for Liquor Licences are decentralised through the Gauteng Liquor Board committee in the region. The LED Department and the City Development Department have permanent representatives on the committee. Thus, through provincial regulation, informal activities are mainstreamed in the liquor industry A programme to formalise the street traders into organised formations has taken off. Section 21 companies of street traders in the towns have been registered. In partnership with these organisations, an allocation system has been developed to better organise the spaces used by vendors. Participatory Democracy and Upgrading Economic Infrastructure A series of consultative meetings with street traders took place during 2004 in flashpoints and over-traded areas. This resulted in a programme wherein the Municipality facilitated the organisation of street traders to provide better services to their clientele. An upgrade of facilities and the development of trader markets has commenced. In this, a partnership with Intersite has helped to integrate economic planning and passenger transport planning. A strategic plan to link the MIG funding to the learnerships of CETA for emerging contractors, to involve unemployed and indigent households in the EPWP, and to facilitate the reskilling of locals, has been devised. This aims to support the municipal capital investment programmes to intervene, in a focused manner, in the second economy. In 2002 and 2003 an amount of R500 000 from the Local Economic Development (LED) fund was invested in micro-enterprise development of 67 potential businesses, by developing business plans. Minor renovations to existing buildings at Club 2000 in Tsakane were carried out and improved technology for 15 existing micro-enterprises was sourced. A marketing and distribution outlet as well as a development committee were also set up. About 16 newly established, innovative businesses were supported. The Cooperatives Industrial Hives Programme From 2003 onwards a catalytic project, the Cooperative Industrial Hives Programme, has created 12 new economic nodes. The economic nodes are in densely populated areas, viz Daveyton, Langaville, Thembisa, Thokoza, Kathlehong, Wattville, Duduza, Kwa Thema, Etwatwa and Vosloorus.

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Just over R10 million was invested in renovating old unused government buildings for this programme. This ensures that apartheid spatial planning is reversed, that urban renewal is brought about, and that unused Council and government buildings are utilised by local communities. In the process of carrying out the renovations, local emerging contractors were engaged and supported to improve their business processes. The Cooperative Industrial Hives Programme extends over 53 wards in Ekurhuleni. A total of 25 cooperatives in manufacturing were established and registered. Set up and start-up funding, amounting to R3,5 million, was provided through the LED fund and own funds for the project. The 25 cooperatives are housed in 12 Industrial Hives throughout Ekurhuleni. These hives will assist to develop new economic nodes, thereby assisting in reversing apartheid spatial planning. The cooperatives are involved in light manufacturing and local production for local needs. A total of 275 sustainable livelihoods have been created in this programme. As the cooperatives grow, the number of sustainable livelihoods will increase. The cooperatives’ productive activities cover a vast range within manufacturing: clothing production, condom manufacturing, food production and packaging, production of household chemicals, construction, road markings, steel production, wood work and recycling. The 25 cooperatives are being further capacitated through the National Skills Fund. Mentoring and funding for equipment was secured for the Cooperative Industrial Hives through the LED programme “Partnerships for Sustainable Development”. The Labour Job Creation Trust as well as local banks supported this programme. Access to Finance A pilot to develop a curriculum on financial systems, particularly linked to micro finance, has been carried out in partnership with the bank seta. Work with the SACCO to set up savings and credit unions across the entire region has commenced. The initial participants would be the cooperatives in the region. Selected industrial hives have been designed to accommodate a banking facility. The common bond from SACCO will improve access to savings mechanisms and is a strategic intervention in the second economy. Five SACCOs will be established in 2007. The informal cooperatives, such as burial societies have been encouraged to formalise themselves following the promulgation of the Cooperatives Act. A total of 20 burial societies were converted during 2006. The outcome of this will be realistic empowerment mechanisms to support micro entrepreneurs and cooperatives to access and manage the finance needed to grow their small ventures. Municipal Procurement and the EPWP BEE targets for municipal procurement have been set and are being monitored to assess the impact on the local economy. The Metro has signed up as a member of Proudly South African to encourage local buying. The challenge of linking the job opportunities provided by government’s Expanded Public Works programme through the Municipal Infrastructure Grants funds, and ensuring both the development of emerging contractors as well as exist strategies for indigent households, has been considered. The development of the strategy for job creation and monitoring is the responsibly of LED, while the implementation of this programme is with departments responsible for infrastructure development. 3.4.4.5 Improving Access to information and reskilling the economy Through a partnership with the business chambers, two new business linkage centres have been established in Germiston and Boksburg using the model of the existing Springs Business Linkage Centre. The business linkage centres harness the procurement opportunities of established business for the benefit of new and emerging local businesses. The municipality has linked these linkage centres to SEDA for tender advice accreditation, and to the Further Education Training Colleges for overall monitoring of quality and standards. The linkage between the GEP and these centres run by the chambers was improved during 2006.

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In partnership with the Borough of Lewisham, and with funding from the Commonwealth Local Government Good Practices Scheme, a pilot project to link the Department of Labour’s local labour centres to unemployed people, and match them to jobs, has been devised. This programme has been launched in one local labour centre and will be rolled out to the entire region during 2007. This programme will improve the capacity of Ward Committees to interact with government services and build linkages to local employers. A demilitarisation project was launched and 1500 ex-combatants have been registered. In partnership with the Gauteng Economic Propeller, a reskilling and new venture creation programme is underway for these beneficiaries. The establishment of Information Centres in seven libraries in 2003 signifies the Municipality’s commitment to facilitate the provision of quality and accessible information to grow the local economy. This project comprised the redressing of backlogs in the provision of facilities, the retraining of staff to use the latest techniques, and the provision of information to citizens. The seven libraries are Reiger Park Library (Boksburg), Spruitview Library (Germiston), the Phomolong Career Centre (adjacent to Tembisa), Jerry Moloi Library (Benoni), Kwa-Thema Library (Springs), Duduza Library (Nigel) and Tsakane Library (Brakpan). These libraries are situated in the most densely populated areas of Ekurhuleni. In the context of a rapidly changing global economy, the challenges facing local communities are more intense than the past. The LED programme has adopted a theme “The Past We Inherited the Future We Create”. This theme is linked to the work in the information centres in libraries, where access to information and empowerment of people is becoming a reality. Training for over 500 people was facilitated as part of the reskilling programme of various SETA’s during 2004 and 2005. This training included Telkom’s programme on BEE and entrepreneurship development, Mining Qualification Authority training on informal miners, the Wholesale and Retail Seta Training of small retailers, and a micro MBA programme which is linked to the casino licence community obligations. The Gauteng Economic Propeller is attempting to extend its services to people through this programme. A programme to link all libraries to the Internet is well underway and bodes well for e-procurement and e-business. The annual business week organised in November each year, has successfully made government more accessible to citizens, work seekers and small entrepreneurs. A job and enterprise fair was arranged to demonstrate a convergence of government services and opportunities. Job opportunities, skills development programmes and enterprise development initiatives undertaken in Ekurhuleni by government, its agencies and institutions, as well as the private sector, were presented. Information and advice with respect to: finding jobs, being involved in learnerships, obtaining bursaries, securing career advice and advice on business development was a key feature of the business week. Jobs related to the EPWP, health, electricity, water services, waste management, policing, construction and manufacturing were made accessible during the business week. Among the government departments and agencies present were: GCIS, Public Works, Labour, SARS, the DTI, SEDA, Umsombvu, local FET colleges, GEP and GTA.

3.5 3.5.1

HIV / AIDS STRATEGY Introduction

AIDS illness and deaths are increasing rapidly. The Actuarial Association of South Africa (AASA) in its report of 2004-2005 mentioned that an estimated 1.5 million people are infected with HIV in Gauteng, with 128 000 ill with AIDS (but the figures are over-estimated by up to 30%). Public understanding of care and support issues has improved; however stigma and discrimination remain a challenge.

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The partnership against HIV & AIDS has broadened participation and response of sectors and civil society organisations since the government call in 1998, and UNAIDS in 2001, for an extended HIV & AIDS programme. Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has endorsed the multi-sectoral approach in fighting the HIV & AIDS epidemic. The multi-sectoral response in the fight against the epidemic increases the involvement of partners in the struggle against HIV & AIDS, bringing together the efforts of all municipal departments and civil society sectors in the implementation of a joint programme. Integrated development planning (IDP) is a strategy to strengthen the coordination of the implementation of the comprehensive and integrated HIV & AIDS programme led by all civil society sectors. The AIDS epidemic requires a unified effort where all sectors and partners in government and in the community contribute according to their roles and strengths, based on a joint strategy and plan. Success in the control of the epidemic can only be achieved through strong political leadership, effective management and administrative support to back up the implementation.

The purpose of the multi-sectoral approach is to prevent and reduce new infections, increase productive lives of people living with HIV & AIDS, and support children and families to cope with the consequences of AIDS in order to reduce the impact of AIDS on society.

3.5.2

VISION

Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is striving to achieve involvement of all government and civil society sectors to promote the optimum socio-economic and developmental environment for the infected and affected people. 3.5.3

MISSION

Ekurhuleni Municipality is committed to:  Create a supportive psycho-social environment

    3.5.4

Mobilise and promote best use of resources Mobilise and motivate sustainable involvement of partners within the workplace and communities Promote institutional and community capacity development Serve the institution and community with diligence, dignity and respect.

HIV & AIDS PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES

The multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme attempts to achieve the following objectives:

    

Create a supportive environment Stimulate and promote multi-sectoral and departmental involvement and cooperation in mainstreaming HIV & AIDS using IDP Speed up implementation of the integrated and target-oriented HIV & AIDS plan Increase human and resource capacity to manage and monitor the HIV & AIDS programme in prevention, care and support Intensify behaviour change

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3.5.5 PRINCIPLES The following principles should underpin the development and implementation of the sectoral and departmental HIV & AIDS strategic operational plans:

   

3.5.5

People living with HIV & AIDS, and the affected, shall be involved in all the prevention, care and support strategies. Empower and support vulnerable groups, in particular women and children to ensure that they do not suffer abuse, discrimination, nor remain unable to take effective measures to prevent infection Implementation shall be sensitive to the culture, language, confidentiality, and social circumstances of all people at all times and prevention of stigma and discrimination with regard to the provision of education, prevention, care and psycho-social welfare to all South Africans. Full community participation, sectoral and integrated approach in the fight against HIV & AIDS, amongst others, should include sectors, stakeholders such as Government departments, private sector and civil society sectors entrenching mainstreaming and partnership against HIV & AIDS.

ANALYSIS OF STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS

3.5.5.1 Strengths  Multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS strategy and plan  Good political support and participation  HIV & AIDS is a key performance area of top management responsible for the management of departments  Community participation and support in campaigns, support & care  Intergovernmental cooperation and institutional support  Provincial allocation of HIV & AIDS Conditional Grant  Expertise acquired over the years in the management of HIV & AIDS epidemic  Departments have started to play a significant role in the planning and implementation of the HIV & AIDS programme  Stakeholder and partner participation is achieved at local and metro levels  Held workshops to clarify roles of the key departments in the control of the epidemic, namely the departments of Health and Social Development and Human Resources Management and Development, as well as the Multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS Unit.  Additional staffing capacity for coordinating programme implementation  In process of developing Provincial HIV & AIDS monitoring and evaluating guidelines 3.5.5.2 Weaknesses

     

The strategic Ekurhuleni AIDS Council needs to be revised Inadequate mobilisation, participation and involvement of departments, sectors, the ward-based structures and departments Fragmented and inadequate integrated approach to management of the epidemic characterised by role confusion Poor communication and coordination of the multi-sectoral plan due to staff shortages Updated baseline data for joint planning of the implementation of the multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS plan Mainstreaming and EAP still a challenge

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3.5.5.3 Threats

      

Unemployment Poverty Sexual assault Lack of nutritional support Poor uptake of VCT and ARTs Competing coordinating and implementation priorities characterised by role confusion Families and children in distress

3.5.5.4 Opportunities  Institutional review and restructuring  Intergovernmental cooperation/support  Strengthen partnership  Safety nets for families and children  Extend participation 3.5.6

COORDINATING STRUCTURES FOR MAINSTREAMING HIV & AIDS

The HIV & AIDS Unit has a responsibility to lead the coordination of the implementation of the National and Provincial HIV & AIDS policies, strategy and plans for both employees and communities. The challenges of the control of the HIV & AIDS epidemic lie in the mainstreaming of the HIV & AIDS programme, and require effective collaboration, resource mobilisation, policy formulation, programme implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The mainstreaming of the Ekurhuleni HIV & AIDS strategy and plan is coordinated and supported as follows:

     

Identify, appoint and delegate responsibilities for the control of the HIV & AIDS epidemic to competent HIV & AIDS Coordinators Department to undertake a situational or status quo analysis and impact study to determine key HIV & AIDS problems and needs based on reliable data, including how they influence employee performance Establish and build departmental capacity to plan, monitor and support the implementation of the HIV & AIDS programme for the employees Facilitate creation of a safe and supportive environment in order to protect confidentiality whilst promoting disclosure and openness on HIV & AIDS Mobilise and allocate resources for programme implementation Submit monthly progress report on implementation to the employees and management and others The model in figure 1 below illustrates mainstreaming of the HIV & AIDS programme.

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Internal Mainstreaming: Workplace Coordinating Structure Staff risks, vulnerability & support

EKURHULENI AIDS UNIT External Mainstreaming: Community Coordinating Structures Developmental, Partners & support

Figure1: Model for mainstreaming HIV & AIDS 3.5.6.1 Internal HIV & AIDS Mainstreaming: Workplace HIV & AIDS Coordinating Structure Departments mainstream HIV & AIDS as a cross cutting issue using the processes of Integrated Development Planning (IDP). The departments investigate the impact of HIV & AIDS on their ability and capacity to deliver services to communities. Internal mainstreaming relates to institutional capacity to deliver municipal services. The HIV & AIDS Unit has a responsibility for coordinating and supporting the implementation of the departmental multi-sectoral workplace plan. Departments investigate the impact of HIV & AIDS on the capability of the staff to render and sustain service delivery. 3.5.6.1.1 Departmental Working Group The structure for internal HIV & AIDS workplace coordination is the departmental working group, made up of Workplace Coordinators appointed in the various departments and directorates. This structure is responsible for consolidating departmental plans and communicating departmental HIV & AIDS planning, implementation and monitoring issues, such as needs and problems raised by employees in the various departments. It also ensures that the working group participates in joint strategic planning sessions.

HIV & AIDS UNIT

MULTI-SECTORAL COORDINATORS

DEPARTMENTAL COORDINATORS

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Figure 2:

Workplace HIV & AIDS Coordinating structure

3.5.6.1 External Mainstreaming: Community HIV & AIDS Coordinating Structures External mainstreaming relates to the impact of HIV & AIDS on service delivery as it relates to transmission of infection, and organisational alignment in the context of high HIV prevalence. The community coordinating structures which facilitate the mobilisation and participation of civil society sectors involved in the implementation of the HIV & AIDS programme in the community include the Ekurhuleni AIDS Council and the Stakeholders’ AIDS Forum at the Metropolitan and Ward levels. See figure 3 below. 3.5.6.1.1 Ekurhuleni AIDS Council The National AIDS Council, chaired by the Deputy President, was launched on 14 January 2000. The Gauteng Provincial AIDS Council, chaired by the Premier, was launched in June 2000. The Executive Mayors of all municipal councils have launched and led the control of the AIDS epidemic in their areas of political responsibilities and are in line with the national and provincial political leadership in their fight against HIV & AIDS. The AIDS Councils lead the promotion of partnership against HIV & AIDS and entrench the participation of all stakeholders of communities including civil society sectors. 3.5.6.1.2 Functions of the Ekurhuleni AIDS Council

The AIDS Council will perform the following functions:  Identify and advise the Municipal Council on strategic and policy issues.  Play a consultative and advocacy role to Municipality and other stakeholders in the area.  Perform a leadership role and support to the regional and Ward-based forums.  Coordinate the implementation of the policies and strategic guidelines for the control of HIV & AIDS.  Promote and support the integrated and multi-sectoral approach to control the impact of AIDS.  Determine critical areas and resources for implementation by stakeholders.  Promote and support research initiatives in HIV & AIDS control.  Cooperate with National and Provincial AIDS Councils.

EKURHULENI AIDS COUNCIL

MAYORAL COMMITTEE ON AIDS

Figure 3:

STRATEGIC TECHNICAL TASK TEAM

Functional Structure of the AIDS Council

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The membership of the AIDS Council is on a voluntary basis. The composition of the AIDS Council has taken into account factors such as expertise in the field of HIV & AIDS, race, gender, age distribution, differences in economic status and the ability to promote the achievement of the goals and objectives of the multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme. The Ekurhuleni AIDS Council, through the profile of the membership, will give confidence and motivate the communities (individuals, groups, families etc.) to participate in AIDS work as their patriotic contribution to control the AIDS epidemic. 3.5.6.3 Sub-Committees of the AIDS Council (a) Mayoral Committee on AIDS The Mayoral Committee on AIDS will comprise of members of the Mayoral Committee, the Speaker of the Council, the Chief Whip and the Strategic Executive Directors. It will assist the AIDS Council in its operations to deliberate on strategic, political, employment and community issues. The Executive Mayor will chair the Mayoral Committee on AIDS monthly. The Mayoral Committee on AIDS will perform the following functions: Provide political and strategic leadership and coordination of the integrated local multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme.  Identify and address multi-sectoral priority issues.  Support the allocation of departmental budget for the multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme.  Play a leadership role in the development of policies and strategic plans for community-based care in support of the infected and affected.  Deal with political and sensitive issues on the implementation of the multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme.  Support integrated government workplace HIV & AIDS programmes.  Support and participate in special Mayoral campaign programmes, such as World AIDS Day.  Investigate and advise the Executive Mayor on technical and policy issues.



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(b) Strategic Technical Task Team The Strategic Technical Task Team will be established by the Executive Mayor to assist the AIDS Council in its decision-making. The task team will consist of experts in the areas of Prevention, Care, Treatment, Management and Support, Information, Education, Communication and Social Mobilisation, Research, Monitoring and Evaluation, Legal issues and Human Rights. The Strategic Technical Task Team will perform the following functions:

       

Advise and get involved in key programme areas and activities on strategy development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Establish norms and standards in the areas identified for the control of the HIV & AIDS epidemic. Monitor, control and guide activities of the forums. Guide capacity building and advice on best practices. Constitute an ethics committee, review and approve applications for research on HIV & AIDS. Approve and monitor the implementation of drug trials. Recommend the resources for implementation of the crucial and priority areas of the programme Receive and acknowledge progress reports from other stakeholders.

3.5.6.4 Management of AIDS Council Role of the chairperson Preside over all general and special AIDS Council meetings. Propose procedure to manage meetings. Spokesperson for the AIDS Council. Ensure that members of Executive Committee and AIDS Council carry out their responsibilities efficiently and effectively.

   

Role of the financial officer  Take a lead in resource mobilisation for the implementation of the multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme.  Receive and deposit funds into Municipal account.  Maintain statements of income and expenditure for the AIDS Council.  All transactions shall be communicated openly to the AIDS Council.  Financial control procedures of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality shall be followed in all financial transactions. Cessation of membership Membership shall cease if a member: Resigns. Is absent from three consecutive meetings without application for leave of absence. Is declared mentally unfit. Is convicted of an offence involving dishonesty or corruption, or any other offence, and sentenced to imprisonment without choice of a fine.  If a member ceases to hold office before the end of term of office, a new member may be elected to fill the vacancy for the remainder of the period of the term of office of the previous member.

   

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Term of Office, occupation and filling of vacancy The term of office for the AIDS Council shall be five years. Members are eligible for re-election for not more than two consecutive terms. Meetings All meetings shall be held at a venue in the Metro offices unless determined otherwise. A quorum shall be formed by a minimum of 50% plus one member present. AIDS Council Meetings The Council will hold at least three (3) meetings a year. The AIDS Council will submit the agenda items six weeks before the meeting. An annual calendar of meeting dates was set at the first AIDS Council meeting.

3.5.6.5

Stakeholders’ Forum

The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality acknowledges the contribution made by individuals and groups in the fight against the epidemic, and is now taking aggressive steps to involvie civil sectors in the control of the epidemic. In its endeavour to fight the HIV & AIDS epidemic the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality entrenched the partnership with civil society and visibly demonstrated the support for the HIV & AIDS infected and affected. The Municipality will also monitor, control and guide activities of Ekurhuleni stakeholders’ AIDS fora.

AIDS COUNCIL

OFFICE OF THE CITY MANAGER & SED

METRO STAKEHOLDERS’ AIDS FORUM

AIDS UNIT

WARD AIDS FORUM Figure 4:

Community Coordinating Structures

The control of the HIV & AIDS epidemic is the responsibility of all those infected and affected by the epidemic. Ekurhuleni AIDS Council will give full support to to people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) in their initiatives of programme planning, implementation and evaluation of the epidemic.

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The community and organisations should organise themselves into HIV & AIDS Stakeholder’s fora at the Metro and Ward levels. At the Ward levels, local multi-sectoral programmes are essential to ensure and promote the involvement and collaboration of all stakeholders in the control of the AIDS epidemic. The following Ward-based sectors should form organised community formations as a cornerstone for the local multi-sectoral control of the epidemic, namely PLWHAs, women, religion, business, labour, culture, sports, civic, youth, media, NGOs and CBOs (strategy, guidelines, services, extension, organised volunteers), employers, health, transport, education, police, justice, welfare, traditional healers, traditional leaders, support groups, families etc. Over and above the stipulated groups, the forum shall accommodate any other interested person or persons to reflect the mass base character of AIDS work in Ekurhuleni. At the ward level, the HIV & AIDS Unit Coordinator is responsible for the coordination of the local multi-sectoral programme aimed at controlling the AIDS epidemic in the ward where the health facilities are situated. The local multi-sectoral AIDS forum will be a Ward-based structure composed of sectors involved in the control of the epidemic, and will have a representation in the Metro and regional AIDS forums.

3.5.6.5.1

          3.5.7

Functions of the Stakeholders’ AIDS forum Establish and coordinate activities of the targets or sectors e.g. women, youth, religious etc. Identify priority areas for implementation in metro, region and wards. Identify resource requirements for use by the fora at all levels. Provide support and capacity building for members and new stakeholders in the regions and wards. Mobilise and motivate for participation of individuals, families and groups in the control of HIV & AIDS. Provide leadership in Non-Governmental Organisations and Community-Based Organisations, including ward-based structures. Propose budget and other resources for consideration by the Municipality and the Ekurhuleni AIDS Council. Maintain communication with the Municipality, AIDS Council and other organisations. Participate in research and dissemination of information. Initiate, implement and evaluate HIV & AIDS campaigns in the area.

Ekurhuleni AIDS Unit

The AIDS Unit has an administrative and coordinating role.

3.5.7.1 Objectives of the AIDS Unit The objectives of the Ekurhuleni AIDS Unit are to:  Give administrative support to the AIDS Council and AIDS forum.  Facilitate and support the strategic development, implementation and monitoring of the multisectoral HIV & AIDS programme.

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Facilitate and support the strategic development, implementation and monitoring of the multisectoral workplace HIV & AIDS programme for employees in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. Play a facilitating role in the development of the multi-sectoral workplace programme on HIV & AIDS in the public and private sectors in Ekurhuleni. Mobilise resources, in conjunction with the AIDS Council, for the implementation of the multisectoral HIV & AIDS programmes/projects and ensure fair distribution. Promote development of integrated/multi-sectoral development plans for implementation of the HIV & AIDS programme within the Ekurhuleni Metro. Promote and strengthen the regional and ward-based HIV & AIDS multi-sectoral programmes within the legislative and policy framework. Plan, implement and monitor special programmes at regional and ward levels. Build capacity of departments within Ekurhuleni Metro and community-based service providers. Liaise with internal and external role players in the fight against the HIV & AIDS epidemic. Support the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation of the multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme.

3.5.7.2 Support to the AIDS Council The staff of the AIDS Unit will provide the following support to the AIDS Council: Role of the secretariat  Organise and prepare for all meetings.  Send out invitations, agenda and minutes 14 days before meetings.  Receive correspondence and communicate.  Take minutes at all meetings.  Compile reports and distribute to all members.  Compile items for discussion at the Executive Committee meetings, and for the Mayoral Committee and Ekurhuleni Council meetings.  Briefings and sharing of information.  Involved in activities such as strategic planning.  Key coordination and communication activities in terms of joint campaigns, provincial and local multi-sectoral AIDS planning committees.  Training in project and programme management.  Supply educational and preventive material, including reports, national and provincial strategy.  Brochures for key programme areas. 3.5.8 Key Performance Areas The implementation of the Multi-sectoral HIV & AIDS programme will take place over the financial year 2004/2005, 2005/2006, and 2006/2007. The key performance areas of the HIV & AIDS programme are derived from the HIV & AIDS sub-programmes including the following:

      

Social Mobilisation Communication Education Prevention Comprehensive Health Care Psycho-social Support HIV & AIDS Monitoring and Evaluation

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HIV & AIDS Programme Management Capacity Building Community participation

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IMPLEMENTATION PLAN OF MULTI-HIV & AIDS PROGRAMME 2006/2007

KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

Reduce new infections

Reduce risk behaviour by supporting prevention strategies

Increase productive life of PLWHA

Support comprehensive HIV & AIDS care & support services

INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGET/ACTIONS *Number of behaviour change * Life skills of vulnerable groups Interventions * Media campaign *Number of risk & vulnerable *Peer education groups assessed *Youth& women leadership *Number of services training supported & assessed *Assess services for youth & vulnerable groups *Promote & Support VCT, PEP, PMTCT, condoms *Address social evils

*Number of strategies implemented *Number of beneficiaries

*Social mobilisation and communication *Public & professional education, nutrition and promotive services *Health medical care & referrals

ANNUAL TARGETS & DEADLINES *Defined all risk groups and settings *100% of all risk management interventions *July 2006; July 2007; July 2008 *Behaviour change June 2010

*Defined all risk groups and settings *100% of all interventions *July 2007, July 2008, July 2009

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KEY PERFORMANCE AREA

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

INDICATORS

Socio-economic development

*Promote psycho-social and economic development

*Number of strategies implemented *Number of beneficiaries

Multi-sectoral response

Effective involvement of internal & external sectors

*Multi-sectoral strategy & plan *Monitoring & evaluation guidelines for sectors

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGET/ACTIONS *Support extension of coverage of services for target & risk groups *Support workplace interventions in government, business & SMMEs *Support poverty relief measures *Support expansion of social support services *Joint planning in mainstreaming *Research, monitoring, evaluation *Staff, sector and volunteer support *Effective workplace EAP services *Stakeholder & sectoral capacity & involvement *Resources for sectoral development

ANNUAL TARGETS & DEADLINES 20% of target groups accessing support services *20% benefit of PLWHA *100% EAP services *June 2006; June 2007; June 2008; June 2009; June 2010; June 2011

*Joint planning of sectors for internal & external clients *Multi-sectoral teams for planning, resource mobilisation & allocation, monitoring & evaluation *June 2007; June 2008; June 2009

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3.6

The EMMDoH Sustainable Human Settlements Drive

The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act 108 Of 1996) The Constitution states: “Access to housing is a constitutional right of all South Africans in terms of Section 26. (1) Everyone has the right to have access to adequate housing.” The Ekurhuleni Municipal Housing Development Plan The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Housing Department (EMMDoH), in conjunction with the Gauteng Department of Housing (GDoH), has formulated a strategic Municipal Housing Development Plan (MHP) for the Metropolitan Municipality. The Municipal Housing Development Plan is primarily a strategic management tool to assist the EMMDoH to focus its energy on ensuring that all activities in the department are working toward the same vision and goals, thereby assessing and adjusting the department’s direction in response to a dynamic environment. In this regard the 2006 - 2025 Municipal Housing Development Plan takes cognisance not only of the broader framework requirements stipulated by the Integrated Development Planning process (IDP) and the Ekurhuleni Growth and Development Strategy 2025 (EGDS), but should also adhere to budget constraints, the Local Government Systems Act 32 of 2000, The Municipal Finance Act, as well as guidelines set by the Policy and Planning Directorate of the Ekurhuleni Housing Department. In addition, specific cognisance is also taken of the Millennium Development Goals, national and provincial directives. As point of departure it is necessary to take specific cognisance of the directives outlined in the Millennium Declaration and the National Department of Housing’s “Breaking New Ground“, which represents a comprehensive plan for the development of sustainable Human Settlements. These are discussed in more detail below:

The Millennium Development Goals

The Millennium Declaration was adopted by the UN member states in the year 2000. It contains eight Millennium Development Goals (MDG), ranging from poverty reduction, health, and gender equality to education and environmental sustainability. The MDG details 18 specific development targets, each of which has a target figure, a timeframe, and indicators designed to monitor to what extent the target has been achieved. The target most closely related to UN-Habitat’s mission is …. Goal 7 Target 11 ….” to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of 100 million slum dwellers by the year 2020”. In addition, the UN assesses progress and challenges with respect to South Africa's sustainable development by examining trends in socio-economic development and policy-making. Cross cutting issues that can be discussed in the context of South African settlements are:

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• • • • • •

poverty eradication; changing unsustainable patterns of production and consumption; health and sustainable development; means of implementation; gender equality; and sustainable development in a globalising world

Breaking New Ground (BNG) Advancing implementation of the Habitat Agenda for sustainable human settlements, the UN Millennium Development Goals and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation, as well as ensuring that South Africa delivers on the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) resolutions 2002, the Minister of Housing L N Sisulu launched “BREAKING NEW GROUND: A COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS” in September 2004. The document outlines ‘a plan for the development of sustainable human settlements over the next five years, embracing the People’s Contract as the basis for delivery.’ The BNG has three parts: PART A: PART B:

BACKGROUND

Provides an outline of the challenges in the sector

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN.

PART C:

BUSINESS PLANS

Highlights shifts in the way that sustainable human settlements will be addressed over the next 5 years and provides a summary of key programmes, highlighting enhancements necessary for successful implementation Provides detailed information on the programmes, with clear indicators of deliverables, timeframes and estimated resource requirements.

The following Business Plans are included:



Business Plan 1: Stimulating the Residential Property Market



Business Plan 2: Spatial Restructuring and Sustainable Human Settlements



Business Plan Programme



Business Plan 4: Social (Medium-Density) Housing Programme



Business Plan 5: Institutional Reform and Capacity Building



Business Plan 6: Housing Subsidy Funding System Reforms



Business Plan 7: Housing and Job Creation

3:

Informal

Settlement

Upgrading

The Plan conceptualises human settlements as entities that provide healthy and secure living environments and where all will have access to the services and goods produced by society. It provides for the provision of a total package of infrastructure, such as clinics, schools, police stations, community facilities, shops and clinics, within the vicinity of homes actually built, in facilitation of good governance. In essence the BNG Plan redirects and enhances existing mechanisms to move towards more responsive and effective delivery

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of a non-racial, integrated society through the development of sustainable human settlements and quality housing. Furthermore, a key aspect of the programme to build sustainable communities is to rid Gauteng of informal settlements by 2014. Over the next five years all existing informal settlements that are situated on safe, habitable and appropriately designated land will be formalised. This will entail providing security of tenure, issuing of title deeds, providing water, sanitation and electricity, and, where necessary, building schools, clinics and recreational facilities. Policy Shifts

An analysis of the “Breaking New Ground Plan” indicates important policy shifts in terms of future housing delivery. These are outlined in the table below: TABLE: POLICY SHIFTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HOUSING DELIVERY IN EKURHULENI DIRECTIVE Adequate Housing for All

Provision of Quality Sustainable Housing

Peoples

POLICY SHIFTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HOUSING DELIVERY IN EKURHULENI  Move focus from stabilising the housing environment to housing delivery that is demand-driven  Shift from investing in people to investing in places  Shift from green fields development to in-situ upgrading, brown fields development and urban renewal  Use the phenomenon of in-migration to grow the economy through managed urbanisation processes  Focus on: - Medium Density Housing Development options - Aligning housing options with the challenges of HIV - Hostel Policy to be more flexible in terms of rental accommodation with focus on the Social Housing Programme - Emergency Relocation Policy - Informal Settlements upgrading Strategy - Provision of adequate Social and Engineering Infrastructure  Land Acquisition as a separate funding mechanism from a housing subsidy  Re-introduction of Individual Subsidy for the secondary market only  Period during which resale on the private market is prohibited from 8 years to 5 years.  Enhancing access to title by implementing a range of measures to stimulate a renewed uptake in the Discount Benefit Scheme and establish a high priority focus to complete the registration of transfer in respect of houses constructed under the existing housing programme  Shift from quantity housing to quality housing to sustainable housing  Support for improved settlement design through the promotion of appropriate technology and construction methods to achieve quality housing environments  Quality of life is offered to each member of society through providing all people with equal opportunities for a healthy, safe and productive life, and ensuring social and economic development (meeting their full hierarchy of needs).  Capacitation and accreditation of municipalities in the housing delivery process.

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DIRECTIVE Contract and Partnerships

Job Creation and Poverty Alleviation

Integrated Housing Delivery

POLICY SHIFTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HOUSING DELIVERY IN EKURHULENI Currently preparing a framework aiming to pilot the first set of accredited municipalities  Training programme for emerging contractors  The construction sector receives the government’s commitment to a partnership, i.t.o an enabling environment including incentives to participate actively in housing delivery to the poorest of the poor  Popularising the concept of Letsema in housing in order for communities to initiate their own housing solutions  The financial sector gets the government’s commitment to a partnership, an enabling environment including incentives to lend to poor households  All South Africans will have an opportunity to access homes in well designed, serviced and located human settlements. For first-time buyers we will have normalised the market and created the necessary facilitation with the banks. They also will have choice. The hard-core poor; i.e. pensioners and the indigent, will access a rental home with no savings requirement.  Subsidy beneficiaries will get increased access to credit and a choice of ownership options and top structures;  Rental accommodation seekers receive access to innovative rental options in secure environments;  Informal settlement inhabitants receive certainty as well as access to proper services, security, choice and formal top structures;  The role of the private sector will be enhanced through the collapsing of the subsidy bands as well as the removal of blockages relating to down-payments for the indigent and pensioners, assessing beneficiaries on spousal income, developing fixed rate and other new loan products including an option to convert the capital grant, where linked to a home ownership or rental, into an annuity based grant or benefit.  Employer groups will be encouraged to make their contribution through employer-assisted housing.  Barriers to housing trade will be removed through amendments to the Housing Act, 1997.  Labour-intensive methods to be used in all Housing Projects  Create short-term job opportunities by enrolling the construction of housing "top structures" with the Expanded Public Works Programme.  Housing Support Centres, working closely with various SETAs, to blend these short term job creation interventions with learnership initiatives  Promote and reinforce areas of economic growth through public sector Capex expenditure  Promote integrated development planning among all tiers of government and private sector through Urban Renewal Projects.  Promote the crowding in of public investment  *Densify development on “well-located” land and Compact the Urban Form  Continued implementation of the key Urban Regeneration initiatives  All programmes will be focused on ring-fencing informal settlements and replacing these with more adequate forms of housing  Promote renewal of the inner city areas and address the neglected lower end of the housing rental market.  Urban Renewal Programme, with dedicated funding mechanism that will

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DIRECTIVE

POLICY SHIFTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HOUSING DELIVERY IN EKURHULENI constitute a National Housing Programme  A social housing policy, providing for the development and regulation of viable social housing institutions, to develop and manage largely rental housing stock for the low end of the market  A special medium density housing development programme to augment the Social Housing Programme  An enabling environment for partnerships with the private sector to invest in Social Housing projects

Good Governance

•    • •

Harmonisation of the municipal Integrated Development Plans and refining the system of Monitoring and Evaluation to improve our performance and the quality of outputs Special Investigative Unit with a hot line to root out corruption Housing Information centres in all townships Implementing the Project Management Office concept to streamline housing delivery between various tiers of Government and ensure proper monitoring and evaluation Communication strategy to promote housing delivery and inform the public about new policies Capacity building and accrediting local authorities to become developers

VISION STATEMENT (EMM) “THE SMART, CREATIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL CITY” ADEQUATE AND SUSTAINABLE HOUSING VISION “Sustainable human settlements are settlements that work. They are settlements in which people live, in which they shop, seek entertainment, care for their children, and socialize and celebrate important holidays or events with their friends and neighbours. Sustainable human settlements are settlements in which people access social amenities such as healthcare clinics, libraries, schools, and so on. Sustainable human settlements are also settlements in which people vote and express their opinions freely; in which they work and pay taxes; and in which all of these things are possible without putting undue stress on the community, the family, the individual, the economy, or the environment.” (Shisaka Development Management Services 2004)

SPATIAL VISION Transport-orientated development approach to link previously disadvantaged communities into the broader economic and social urban fabric EMMDoH MISSION STATEMENT

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‘To plan, facilitate, implement and manage targeted human settlements through efficient and effective resource allocation in partnership with stakeholders, which provides and promotes the provision of sustainable housing opportunities to the residents of Ekurhuleni” EMMDoH OBJECTIVES Objective 1: Achieve overall alignment through • Consolidating, confirming and instilling a Shared Housing Vision between Ekurhuleni and all tiers of Government, Role Players and Stakeholders by outlining and emphasising focus areas in terms of Housing Delivery • Ensuring alignment with provincial and national housing and planning directives and policies. • Ensuring sustainable and spatially integrated housing delivery Objective 2: Take appropriate interventions • Establishing a common understanding of housing delivery challenges and constraints • Aligning budgets and capacities to the objectives of the Department • Clearly establishing deliverables and targets • Indicating new housing delivery directives, policy shifts and interventions i.t.o:  Perspective One: Adequate Housing  Perspective Two: Quality Sustainable Housing  Perspective Three: Job Creation and Poverty Alleviation  Perspective Four: Good Governance (See Ekurhuleni COMPREHENSIVE SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PLAN 2006-2025) Objective 3: Ensure sustainable implementation • Ensuring integration with Municipal Integrated Development Plan (MIDP), Spatial Development Frameworks (SDF) and local planning policies and guidelines EMMDoH POINTS OF DEPARTURE The following “Points of departure” form the backbone of the Overall City Housing Strategy: • •



Implementing a pro-poor focus Increased tenure options, housing typologies, densities and space utilisation:  firstly, in relation to rental stock,  secondly, in relation to informal settlements (upgrading for growth), and  thirdly, in terms of promoting and developing the previously disadvantaged areas’ (townships’) residential property markets Developing appropriate Housing Policies to specifically improve space utilisation

EMMDoH CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS (CSFs) AND CORE COMPETENCIES The following CSFs were identified, with the core competencies of each of the Housing Directorates that are required to manage the execution of the services successfully: •



Identification of property suitable for housing  Spatial and urban planning guidelines for identified land for the creation of sustainable urban settlements  Efficiency and access to community needs Spatial restructuring

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• • • • •







 Appropriate densities and transport-orientated development  Node development Accelerating delivery  Forward planning  Access to and acquisition of resources Cost-effective delivery  Qualitative and quantitative delivery Eradication of poverty  Job Creation and skills development  Local Economic Development Stabilisation of land invasion  Resettlement/relocation assistance  Political and administrative synergy Skilled and competent personnel  Recruitment and training  Teamwork  ISO 9001 implementation Funding  Secure funding and budget. Investigate additional funding and bridge funding sources to accelerate delivery to meet Millennium Goals as well as targets set out in the Growth and development Strategy of EMM Communication  Effective horizontal and vertical communication  Integration of planning, delivery and budgets at local, provincial and national level to ensure the creation of sustainable human settlements. Facilitate the creation of an enabling housing environment  Facilitation of housing opportunities  Delivery of housing stock.  Facilitation and management of housing projects

NOTE: Full Details are covered in the Comprehensive Sustainable Human Settlements Plan, 20062025, which is available at the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s Housing Department.

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3.7 DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN FOREWORD

South Africa has aligned itself to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction and in so doing also to the Africa Regional Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction (ARSDRR). The New partnership for Africa Development (NEPAD) and the Africa Union Commission, with support from UN/ISDR Africa, AfDB, UNDP-BCPR and UNEP, developed the Africa Regional Strategy for DRR (ARSDRR) aimed at facilitating integration of DRR into development programmes of member states and institutional programmes.

The ARSDR is an African Regional Disaster risk reduction framework for action, whose mission is to reduce or eliminate the conditions that promote vulnerability to natural hazards and related technological and environmental phenomena which result in human, social, economic and environmental losses in Africa. Objectives of the ARSDRR 1. To reduce the social, economic and environmental impacts of disasters on African people and economies, for sustainable development. 2. To increase understanding and knowledge of DRR as an integral part of sustainable development. 3. To increase capacity at sub-regional and national levels for mainstreaming and implementing DRR into development processes. ASDRR Mechanism of Implementation 1. African Ministerial Conference for DRR 2. Africa Working Group (AWG) of the Global Platform for DRR (headed by the AU, members include heads of all RECs and the AAG) 3. Africa Advisory Group (AAG) (Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Madagascar, Algeria, Senegal, South Africa, AU, regional consultants) 4. Africa Regional Economic Commissions (RECs) i.e: IGAD, EAC, ECOWAS, SADC, ECCAS, IOC, COMESA. 5. National Governments 6. UN Agencies to support 7. Africa Programme of Action” [Online. http://www.unisdr.org/africa/af-about/about-isdr-strategy.htm. Accessed: 12 June 2006] DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS ABBREVIATIONS CBO

Community based organisation

COID

Compensation for occupational injuries and diseases

DRR

Disaster risk reduction

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IDNDR

International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction

IDP

Integrated Development Programme

IDP’s

Integrated Development Programme’s

ISDR

International Strategy for Disaster Reduction

JOC

Joint Operations Centre

MDMC

Municipal Disaster Management Centre

NDMC

National Disaster Management Centre

NGO

Non-governmental organisation

OHS

Occupational Health and Safety

PDMC

Provincial Disaster Management Centre

UNDMTP

United Nations Disaster Management Training Programme

UNDP

United Nations Development Programme

UNDRO

United Nations Disaster Relief Organisation

UN-ISDR

United Nations – International Strategy for Disaster Reduction

DEFINITIONS Integrated Development Plan: “A single, inclusive and strategic plan for the development of the municipality which— (a) links, integrates and co-ordinates plans and takes into account proposals for the development of the municipality; (b) aligns the resources and capacity of the municipality with the implementation of the plan; (c) forms the policy framework and general basis on which annual budgets must be based;” (Municipal Systems Act: 32 of 2000) Disaster: “means a progressive or sudden, widespread or localised, natural or human-caused occurrence which— (a) causes or threatens to cause— (i) death, injury or disease; (ii) damage to property, infrastructure or the environment; or (iii) disruption of the life of a community; and

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(b) is of a magnitude that exceeds the ability of those affected by the disaster to cope with its effects using only their own resources;” (Disaster Management Act: 57 of 2002) Disaster Management: “means a continuous and integrated multi-sectoral, multi-disciplinary process of planning and implementation of measures aimed at— (a) preventing or reducing the risk of disasters; (b) mitigating the severity or consequences of disasters; (c) emergency preparedness; (d) a rapid and effective response to disasters; and (e) post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation” (Disaster Management Act: 57 of 2002) Preparedness: Means to ensure in times of disaster appropriate systems, procedures and resources are in place to assist those affected by the disaster and enable them to help themselves. (UNDP: Overview of Disaster Management: 1992) Response: “means measures taken during or immediately after a disaster in order to bring relief to people and communities affected by the disaster” (Disaster Management Act: 57 of 2002) Recovery: Refers to those actions after a disaster, which attempts to bring order to the disaster site and aids in bringing the situation back to normality. (UNDP: Overview of Disaster Management: 1992) Mitigation: “means measures aimed at reducing the impact or effects of a disaster” (Disaster Management Act: 57 of 2002) Development: “means sustainable development, and includes integrated social, economic, environmental, spatial, infrastructural, institutional, organisational and human resources upliftment of a community aimed at— (a) improving the quality of life of its members with specific reference to the poor and other disadvantaged sections of the community; and (b) ensuring that development serves present and future generations;” (Municipal Systems Act: 32 of 2000) Rehabilitation: Is the operations and decisions taken after a disaster with a view to restoring a stricken community to its former living conditions. (UNDP: Overview of Disaster Management: 1992) Reconstruction:

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Are the actions taken to re-establish a community after a period of rehabilitation subsequent to a disaster. (UNDP: Overview of Disaster Management: 1992) Municipal Entity: “(a) a company, co-operative, trust, fund or any other corporate entity established in terms of any applicable national or provincial legislation and which operates under the ownership control of one or more municipalities, and includes, in the case of a company under such ownership control, any subsidiary of that company; or (b) a service utility;” (Municipal Systems Act: 32 of 2000) Sustainable development: “Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of the future generations to meet their own needs. It contains within it two concepts: the concept of “needs”, in particular the essential needs of the worlds poor, to which overriding priority should be given; and the idea of limitations imposed by the state of technology and social organization on the environment’s ability to meet present and the future needs. (Brundtland Commission, 1987).” (As quoted by UNISDR: Terminology on disaster risk reduction (working document) Updated 03.12.03.) Vulnerability: “The conditions determined by physical, social, economic, and environmental factors or processes, which increase the susceptibility of a community to the impact of hazards. For positive factors, which increase the ability of people to cope with hazards, see definition of capacity.” (http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005) Risk “The probability of harmful consequences, or expected losses (deaths, injuries, property, livelihoods, economic activity disrupted or environment damaged) resulting from interactions between natural or human-induced hazards and vulnerable conditions. Conventionally risk is expressed by the notation Risk = Hazards x Vulnerability. Some disciplines also include the concept of exposure to refer particularly to the physical aspects of vulnerability. Beyond expressing a possibility of physical harm, it is crucial to recognize that risks are inherent or can be created or exist within social systems. It is important to consider the social contexts in which risks occur and that people therefore do not necessarily share the same perceptions of risk and their underlying causes.” (http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005) Risk assessment/analysis “A methodology to determine the nature and extent of risk by analysing potential hazards and evaluating existing conditions of vulnerability that could pose a potential threat or harm to people, property, livelihoods and the environment on which they depend. The process of conducting a risk assessment is based on a review of both the technical features of hazards such as their location, intensity, frequency and probability; and also the analysis of the

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physical, social, economic and environmental dimensions of vulnerability and exposure, while taking particular account of the coping capabilities pertinent to the risk scenarios.” (http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005)

INTRODUCTION The Disaster Management Act (Act 57 of 2002) provides disaster management managers with a new focus on disaster management. It presents new challenges in not only negotiating and writing up a disaster management plan but also in developing disaster management plans for general public scrutiny. Public scrutiny and acceptance of disaster management plans, prior to its implementation, has become a legislative requirement (Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000). The Municipal Systems Act, in section 25 indicates that each municipality should adopt a “single, inclusive and strategic plan for the development of a municipality.” The plan referred to is the Integrated Development Plan. The same Act in section 26(g) dictates that “applicable disaster management plans”, are a core component of the Integrated Development Plan of a Municipality. Therefore the challenge is to develop a disaster management plan, which all stakeholders – community, public, commercial, etc - of a municipal entity are able to comprehend and implement within their own setting, and which indicates the procedures and processes required to minimise the threat of disaster , utilising a developmental approach. Another challenge includes community and other stakeholder participation in not only the activation of disaster response procedures but also in mitigation and development initiatives, which would lead to sustainable development.

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Figure 1: Disaster Management Continuum Figure 1 illustrates the continuum – it should be noted that Disaster Management is not only reactive, but also involves actions aimed at preventing disasters, or mitigating the impact of disasters. Different line functions and departments must contribute in varying degrees to Disaster Management in the various phases of the Disaster Management Continuum. The needs identified in the corporate disaster management plan will indicate where line functions and departments must contribute. These contributions will then be included in line function and departmental disaster management plans. Disaster management plans cover the whole disaster management continuum, and must address actions before, during and after disasters. Disaster management plans are compiled on the basis of a generic plan including standard operating procedures and best practice, and then expanded with risk-specific plans that address disaster management for special circumstances where the generic plan needs to be adapted.

PURPOSE This plan predetermines, to the extent possible, actions to be taken by the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (EMM) and by cooperating private organizations, to prevent disasters if possible, to reduce the vulnerability of EMM residents to any disasters that may occur, to establish capabilities for protecting citizens from the effects of disasters, to respond effectively to the actual occurrence of disasters, and to provide for recovery in the aftermath of any disaster involving extensive damage or other debilitating influence on the normal pattern of life within the community.

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POLICY STATEMENT The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is committed to maintaining a vigilant state of disaster preparedness, response, rehabilitation and reconstruction within a safe and sustainable framework for the residents, staff, stakeholders and neighbours, because all are susceptible to disasters. Enlightened selfinterest tells us that to be prepared is the greatest weapon against disaster. In recognition of the possibility of both small and large disasters, the Disaster Management Centre devised the following plan to ensure that appropriate actions are taken in the event of a disaster. This plan provides stakeholders with a set of disaster priorities, emergency procedure guidelines, lists of personnel and geographical information (GIS). It will be updated annually to ensure accuracy and currency. DISASTER MANAGEMENT STRATEGY The main strategy of all disaster management activities will be disaster risk reduction. A risk reduction strategy will ensure alignment with the strategies adopted internationally. In order to demonstrate the components, the following diagramme is provided:

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Figure 2: Disaster Risk Reduction Framework. [Online. http://www.irinnews.org/webspecials/DR/ISDR-Framework.pdf. Accessed: 12 June 2006]

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STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION PROCESS The plan was circulated to all departments in the EMM for consideration and comment. Comment was incorporated into the plan or included into the hazard specific plans which are filed separately.

ASSUMPTIONS Situations The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is exposed to many hazards, all of which have the potential to disrupt the community, cause damage and create casualties. Possible natural hazards include sinkholes, extreme cold, floods, tornadoes, heavy rain and other violent storms, and earthquakes due to mining and other activities. Other disaster situations could develop from a hazardous materials accident, major transportation accident, terrorism, or civil disorder. Assumptions The Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, section 43 delineates the responsibility of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to establish a Disaster Management Centre while section 44 delineates the responsibility for the protection of life and property. Local government has the primary responsibility for its own disaster management activities. When an emergency / disaster exceeds the municipality’s capability to respond, assistance will be requested from the provincial and simultaneously national government in terms of section 49 (1) (b). The provincial and national government will provide assistance to the municipality, when appropriate. While it is likely that outside assistance would be available in most major disaster situations affecting the EMM, and while plans have been developed to facilitate coordination of this assistance, it is necessary for the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to plan for, and to be prepared to carry out, disaster response and short-term recovery operations on an independent basis. A major disaster can exhaust the resources of a single jurisdiction or directly impact more than one jurisdiction. It may require resources from numerous agencies and levels of government. MUNICIPAL PROFILE See the data presented in the relevant section of the Integrated Development Plan. ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE AND SUCCESSION The ultimate responsibility for disaster management in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality belongs with the Council in terms of section 55 (1) of the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, while the Council under Council resolution PS20/2001 has delegated authority to the Executive Mayor to deal with disasters. The Head of the Disaster Management Centre, Director Emergency Services, and Chief of Police provide support and coordination for all municipal disaster operations. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality will exercise full authority over disaster operations, when the disaster situation exists entirely within the boundaries of its jurisdiction unless the disaster is reclassified as a provincial or national disaster. If more than one municipality is affected or if there is a very serious disaster, the provincial disaster management centre and the national disaster management centre will be notified; but it will not necessarily assume control of all functions. The provincial disaster management centre (PDMC) may decide to restrict its activities - relative to the affected area to monitoring, coordinating, and providing requested support.

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In case of the threat or actual impact of a very destructive, widespread disaster in the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, which covers an extended time period, the entire disaster management centre may be activated. It is vital that the operational management function is provided and that succession planning is planned for as the individuals who occupy these positions may be injured or unable to provide the management function required after a disaster. This section provides the reader with the top management organisational structure. The section further indicates the succession philosophy of the municipality. The procedures for municipal line of succession follow Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, Act 117 of 1998. The line of succession for the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality in the absence of the Mayor, i.e. next in command with authority for Disaster Management responsibilities would be the councillor appointed by the Council at a meeting as described by section 48 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act. The line succession for the office of the City Manager are the Deputy City Managers. The line of succession for the Head of the Disaster Management Centre is the Executive Manager: Disaster Management: Planning and Operations and the Executive Manager: Disaster Management: Communications. The line of succession for each department head is according to the operating procedures established by each department. Each department will detail the succession structures in its disaster management procedures. RISK PROFILE This section describes the risk profile of the municipality. The preliminary risk and vulnerability assessment performed with the aid of a questionnaire to all Councillors and Ward Councillors indicated the risks and vulnerabilities below. These risks were confirmed in part through a formal risk assessment in the Southern Service Delivery Region: Risk formula: RISK

=

HAZARD X VULNERABILITY ------------------------------------------CAPACITY OR MANAGEABILITY

Risks Natural Hazards • Lightning strikes causing fires and / or damage to: • Power lines • Commercial and industrial buildings • Veld fires Informal settlements • Floods - especially close to or affecting informal settlements • Heat wave • Extreme cold • Fires in informal settlements • Subsidence in dolomite areas

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• • • •

Strong winds and tornadoes Earthquakes Thunderstorms Health related disasters

Technological Hazards • Hazardous material spills and accidents (roads, rail and air) • Mine tremors • Major accidents (especially along the N1, N3, N12, N17, R24 and R21) • Aircraft crashes (Johannesburg International Airport and Rand Airport) • Explosion - .e g. (AEL) African Explosives (LTD) • Sasol Gas pipeline leaks and explosions • Petronet pipelines • Rail accidents and derailments Vulnerabilities • Residents living in unsafe areas (dolomite, mine dumps, along major road and rail corridors, etc). • Residents in informal settlements close to hazards. • Residents not trained in disaster risk reduction actions and preparedness. • Lack of awareness of disaster risks. Manageability / Capacity Manageability means; Capable of being managed or controlled. Capacity means; “A combination of all the strengths and resources available within a community, society or organization that can reduce the level of risk, or the effects of a disaster. Capacity may include physical, institutional, social or economic means as well as skilled personal or collective attributes such as leadership and management. Capacity may also be described as capability.” (http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005) CROSS BOUNDARY ASSISTANCE AND AGREEMENTS At present, a number of agreements exist between the Metro Police, the Emergency Services and other Departments. These are operational agreements and should be reviewed on a regular basis. ASSIGNMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES It is vital that the primary and secondary risk reduction and response responsibilities are noted. This section provides opportunity for the statement concerning the assignment of duties and responsibilities of municipal departments and includes the duties and responsibilities of National and Provincial departments, NGOs, CBOs and other stakeholders where these have been formalised. It must be noted that the primary and secondary functions of disaster management role-players provided below may from time to time, change as a result of organisational or other restructuring, developments or amendments to the plan. NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION CORPORATE AND LEGAL



PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Responsible for the

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES •

Assist with committee services at Disaster

203

NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION • • MUNICIPAL INFRASTRUCTURE

• • •





• •



• •



PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES management of council properties. Provide legal advice on disaster management related claims submitted. Provide the necessary legal support in drafting disaster management by-laws. Prioritisation of restoration of disrupted water supplies. Coordinate the emergency supply of water during prolonged disruption. Coordinate the restoration of major disruptions in power supply according to priority ratings. Responsible for ensuring that electricity cables and facilities do not present a hazard during a disaster. Responsible for coordinating awareness programmes on the safe usage of electricity. Coordinate emergency supplies of electricity to reservoirs. Responsible for the emergency supply of electricity to a temporary housing centre established for evacuees/refugees. Responsible for ensuring that data on resources relevant to the services, are kept updated and information on this is forwarded to the DMC. Responsible for the safe disposal of solid waste during emergencies. Responsible for the identification of temporary dumping sites during emergencies. Coordinates any community programmes aimed at

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES •

• • • • •

Management Advisory Forum meetings. Assist with bulk printing of notices and brochures aimed at enhancing community awareness and preparedness.

Assist with monitoring of potable of water and levels of pollution. Assist with emergency radio communications. Assist with labour intensive tasks. Assist with bulk transport Attend relevant disaster management advisory or task team meetings

204

NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION

• • • • •

HUMAN RESOURCES

METROPOLITAN POLICE

PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES informing the population on safe disposal of solid waste during disruption of service. Investigate and report on building safety after a disaster. Transportation of people and goods during evacuation procedures. Provision of traffic management equipment, e.g. cones Repair and maintain roads. Provide for safe sewerage disposal and repairs to systems.



SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Coordinate the handling of stress of employees involved with disaster relief and recovery operations. • Maintain records received on specialist skills and qualifications acquired by municipal employees in accordance with the identified needed categories determined by the Disaster Management Centre. • Coordinate municipal employee disputes that have arisen during disaster management operations or projects. Maintenance of law and order in terms of relevant legislation.



In addition: • Coordinate access control to a disaster area • Coordinate traffic control near/at an emergency housing centre. • Provide escort services to emergency vehicles. • Determine safe alternative routes. • Maintain up to date



• •

• •

• • • • •

Assist with record keeping of disaster management volunteers recruited in terms of the Disaster Management Act and municipal adopted policy. Assist with the recruitment and screening of volunteers, when such requests are received. Assist with arranging of training courses aimed at enhancing disaster management related skills of employees from different departments.

Assist with warning to communities at risk. Assist with monitoring of developing hazards at strategic points. Assist with providing trained drivers (for specialised vehicles) Assist with basic emergency first aid. Assist with the distribution of awareness and preparedness material during major campaigns. Assist with search and rescue operations. Assist with security at an emergency housing centre. Assist in patrolling of evacuated areas.

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NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION



EMERGENCY SERVICES

• •



• •









PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES information on personnel with specialised skills that could be useful during and after a disaster. Collect data on location and numbers of people in existing and new informal settlements for forwarding to Housing Coordinate & direct fire fighting operations Coordinate & direct fire prevention through public education, awareness and fire safety programmes. Coordinate & direct the rescue of people from fires and other life threatening dangers.. Coordinate the handling of treating the spillage/spread of hazardous chemicals. Provide basic training in fire fighting for council employees, fire service reservists, identified volunteers and community based organisations. Ensuring that knowledge and records of existing and potential hazards and risks are forwarded and kept updated at a central register. Participate in Disaster Management Advisory Forum activities, when expert input from service is required (at Forum and/or task team level) Initiate and direct evacuation and other matters incidental thereto, due to fire or hazmat incidents. Coordinate and direct triage, treatment and transportation of injured.

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES NOTE: Secondary roles can only be performed if primary functions do not require intense attention.

• • • • • •

Assist with (limited) supply of potable water. Assist with monitoring water levels of streams/rivers, during severe and extended rainfall periods. Assist with early warning to communities at risk. Assist with evacuation of areas under threat. (not of an emergency service related nature) Assist with (limited) emergency lighting and pumping equipment. Assist with projects aimed at risk reduction.

206

NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION •

SPORTS, RECREATION, ARTS & CULTURE

• •









DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH







PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Monitor and provide on site advice on major hazardous installations (MHI) emergency planning. Coordinate and prepare sites for the mass burial of deceased.(Metro Parks) Provision of halls, open spaces, sports grounds and parks should suitable venues be required for emergency housing ( Sports & Metro Parks) Coordinate the removal of fallen trees that are causing a hazard, in conjunction with fire services ( Metro Parks) Coordinate the distribution of leaflets, posters and the like through library points, to enhance awareness and preparedness. ( Library & Information Services) Provide public access to general disaster management information including the use of Intranet, in conjunction with ICT (Library & Information Services) Ensure up to date information is available on departmental resources that could be utilised for disaster management purposes. (i.e. capacity and facilities at venues/sites) (ALL) Coordinate the monitoring of vector control.(Environmental Health) Coordinate the actual and potential outbreak of epidemics. (Family Health & Environmental Health & Special Programmes) Coordinate the

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

• •

• •

Assist with recreational and education programmes at emergency housing centres. ( Metro Parks) Assist with providing information on missing and displaced persons should libraries and recreation centres and sports facilities have to be used as information points.(Library & Information Services) Assist with labour intensive tasks. (ALL) Assist with vehicles and drivers for mass transport purposes. (ALL)

NOTE: Secondary roles can only be provided if primary roles do not require intense attention.

• • • • •

Assist in determining the needs of disaster survivors.(i.e. vulnerable groups such as orphans, elderly, homeless) (ALL) Assist with decontamination measures.(Environmental Health) Assist in the manning of emergency first aid posts (Family Health) Assist hospitals with medical expertise during crisis. (Family Health) Assist with the handling of stress of

207

NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION















PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES implementation of projects aimed at greater awareness and preparedness of communities on health risk issues (environmental and community health aspects). (Environmental Health & Community Development & Family Health) Coordinate the hygienic preparation of emergency food supplies and monitor the quality of stocks used for that purpose. (Environmental Health) Monitoring the portability of emergency water supplies.(Environmental Health) Ensure that up to date data is maintained and forwarded to a central register, on health related hazards and risks. ( Family Health & Environmental Health) Maintain health information system and provide management information system. (Special programmes) Coordinate environmental projects aimed at reducing communities’ risks and hazards exposure.( Environmental Health) Serve on Disaster management Advisory Forum (task teams) when matters related to Health and Social Development are to be attended to. (ALL) Handling of stress of employees involved with disaster relief and recovery operations. (Community Development – Social Workers)

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

• • • •

employees involved with disaster relief and recovery operations (Family Health). Assist with the handling of stress of victims of a disaster (Family Health) Assist with the mass disposal of bodies. (Environmental Health) Assist with medicine controls and distribution. (Family Health) Assist by attending JOC meetings when special input of department is required due to the nature of the disaster. (ALL)

208

NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION •

HOUSING DEPARTMENT







FINANCE AND INTERNAL AUDIT

• •

ICT

• • • •

COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING



DEVELOPMENT PLANNING



PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES Accessing social aid grants. (Community Development – Social Workers)

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Coordinate the prioritisation of relocation of communities living in identified hazardous circumstances. Coordinate the monitoring of major (subsidised) council housing development projects being undertaken to ensure that disaster risk reduction strategies are not overlooked. Provide data on locality and estimated number of residence in informal settlements. Administer emergency purchases in line with legislation Coordinate the assessment of damages. Coordinate the retrieval of ICT data should any have been lost. Ensure Wide Area connections required are operational. Provide ICT support to the Disaster Management Centre Provide maintenance services for ICT equipment. Execute the Communications and marketing plan to ensure that stakeholders are properly informed of actions being taken to reduce and or combat the effects of the hazard GIS & Development Planning Data capture and maintenance: this includes the maintenance of the GIS

• •

Assist with the correct identification and allocation of suitable land, to ensure that it cannot create or enhance a potential hazard. Provide assistance within regions with the effective management of an emergency housing centre.

NOTE: Secondary roles can only be provided if primary roles do not require intense attention.



Assist with stock control and issues.



Provide administrative support to the Disaster Management Centre.





Provide assistance to the ICT department.

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NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION

ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

SOUTH AFRICAN RED CROSS

PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES system, GIS database, GIS software, core GIS data sets as well as other functional GIS data sets. • GIS Data dissemination: compilation of maps and the provision of data to the DMC • Manipulation of GIS resources for purposes of forward planning and response planning • Environmental planning and coordination • Environmental impact management • Environmental quality control and law enforcement • Environmental education and awareness • Tourism Marketing • Ensure that local production efforts are geared towards disaster rehabilitation. • Support community-based interventions in disaster recovery. • Create opportunity for local development in support of a robust society. After liaison with and agreement by relevant authorities within Ekurhuleni, S A Red Cross Regional Office and at National level : • •

SOUTH AFRICAN COUNCIL OF CHURCHES (SACC) AND



Co-ordinate appeals for international aid requested. Co-ordinate international aid received, (in the form of goods, equipment and finances).

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

• •

• •

Assist in the management of persons coming into a disaster site. Assist with the management of national and international disaster responders.

Assist with human skills development Support initiatives which create opportunity for disaster victims to recover from the hazard impact and regain dignity

Assist with : • • • •

First aid related training. Home nursing training. Search and rescue operations. Establishment of an emergency housing centre.(Temporary shelter assistance) • Establishment of first aid posts. • Implementing awareness and preparedness programmes relevant to Red Cross expertise. • Providing a tracing service for evacuated / rescued persons. • Serve on relevant Disaster Management Advisory Forum and Task Team(s) The following services can be provided in support of disaster management :

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NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION OTHER FAITH BASED ORGANISATIONS

PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

After a disaster (re-active measures) : • • • • • •

Providing counselling to the bereaved, in the affected area and / or at an emergency housing centre. Assisting with appeals for addressing of the needs of those affected by the disaster. Assisting with procurement of feeding and housing items and other important survival needs. Continued follow up on counselling / other needs during the recovery and reconstruction phases after the disaster. Assisting with potential conflict resolution measures at an emergency housing centre / temporary housing centre. Could further be requested to become involved in the overall recovery and rehabilitation process for affected communities.

Pro-active measures : •

SALVATION ARMY



Assist with implementing programmes aimed at enhancing hazard awareness and preparedness measures.

The following functions can be performed in support to other services : After a disaster (Re-active measures) : • • • • •

Providing counselling to bereaved at emergency housing centre. Assisting with collection and distribution of clothing and essential bedding to homeless at an emergency housing centre. Assisting with the establishment and manning of an emergency housing centre. Providing / preparing (limited) basic meals. Assisting with tracing of relations in areas not affected by the emergency / disaster.

Pro-active measures : •

Assist with implementing major programmes aimed at creating / enhancing awareness and

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NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION

PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES preparedness amongst communities at risk.

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL DEFENCE FORCE (SANDF)

In terms of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act 108 of 1996) Section 200, the SANDF’s; Primary Role is : “to defend and protect the Republic, its territorial integrity and its people, in accordance with the Constitution and the principles of international law regulating the use of force.”

Should a disaster occur, the following secondary functions can be requested if available : •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE (SAPS)

Maintenance of law and order in terms of relevant legislation.

• • • • • • • • • •

Assisting with the supply of food and other essential commodities needed by a community that has been adversely affected by a disaster. Assisting with tents / emergency housing / feeding.(limited) Assisting with rescue and search operations. Assisting with emergency repairs of roads / bridges. Assisting with emergency water supplies and restoration of essential services. Assisting with protection duties at evacuated areas. Providing bulk transport. Supply and manning of (mobile) medical facilities and / or casualty clearing post(s). Supply of helicopter for search, rescue and transport purposes. Assisting with access control / cordons. Providing mobile telecommunication links. Assist with manpower / transport during extensive pro-active campaigns in the area. Assist with handling of trauma cases. Assist with additional medical personnel at hospitals. Providing a protective role in the event of relief work being carried out where the public could become a “nuisance factor”. Assisting in search operations for missing persons. Assisting with rescue operations of trapped persons / animals. Assisting with warnings / instructions to the public. Assisting with cordoning off affected area(s). Patrolling of evacuated area(s) against possible looting. Assisting with debriefing of victims. Assisting with the supplying of water carts and generators. Assisting with evacuation of dangerous

212

NAME OF DEPARTMENT / ORGANISATION

PRIMARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

SECONDARY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES •

SOUTH AFRICAN RADIO LEAGUE / HAMNET

ST. JOHN’S AMBULANCE AND OTHER SIMILAR ORGANISATIONS

Provide emergency communication links and networks in the even t of a major breakdown of telecommunications by daily service providers / municipal networks.

areas. Assisting with investigation (causal factors of disasters).



Provision of a dedicated radio link independent from any existing emergency radio frequency in use. • Setting up a command net between key points, thus relieving other services from using, own frequencies. • Assist with tracing or contacting relatives in other parts of S.A (or other countries) using existing extensive two-way radio coverage. • Assist with processing enquiries from relatives of affected communities, originally from other areas. St. John’s Ambulance can assist with : • • • • • • • •

Providing an ambulance service (limited). Casualty treatment and triage. Establishing and manning of a medical / casualty treatment post. Home nursing (limited). Emergency feeding (if transport can be provided for volunteers). The manning of clinic facility, at an emergency housing centre. Providing first aid training. Promoting awareness and preparedness amongst communities at risk, in particular on health related matters.



DISASTER RISK REDUCTION Disaster risk reduction is currently the key strategy for disaster management. The implementation of disaster risk reduction strategies, by all departments of the EMM, will result in the integration of these strategies into sustainable development. ACTIONS 1.1.1. Through training, shift the approach from disaster response to risk reduction. 1.1.2. Integrate risk reduction into development planning. 1.1.3. Promulgate by-laws in support of risk reduction. 1.1.4. Provide for sufficient budget for staffing and administration. 1.1.5. Maintain the legislative requirement for a Municipal Disaster Management Advisory Forum. 1.1.6. Keep accurate information on hazards, vulnerability and capacity assessments.

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1.1.7. 1.1.8. 1.1.9. 1.1.10. 1.1.11. 1.1.12. 1.1.13. 1.1.14. 1.1.15. 1.1.16. 1.1.17. 1.1.18. 1.1.19.

Ensure risk monitoring capabilities. Develop and implement risk assessment and environmental impact assessments and tools. Use effective indicators for forecasting and prediction of disasters. Implement early warning and dissemination strategies. Institute disaster reduction training, education and awareness in schools, the community and other institutions. Increase media involvement in disaster risk reduction. (e.g. disaster risk reduction day) Continue research into disaster risk reduction. Interface between environmental management and disaster risk reduction. Develop and implement sustainable livelihood strategies. Support urban renewal and local economic sustainable development strategies, i.e. land use planning. Ensure effective preparedness, logistic and response planning. Develop focal points for Disaster Management within each Customer Care Centre which would bring disaster management to the residents. Establish and maintain volunteer units.

RELATIONSHIP TO DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS Since disaster risk reduction begins within the development realm, it is vital that all development projects of the municipality are evaluated from a disaster management perspective. Approved developmental projects are included in the IDP’s Capital budget section.

DISASTER RESPONSE Disaster response consists of relief actions after a disaster and continues with rehabilitation and reconstruction processes and actions in order to return the affected to normal while, ensuring that they are not again exposed to the threat in the same manner. Details related to hazard specific disaster response are confidential and not for publication. OVERVIEW OF DISASTER RESPONSE ACTIONS • If possible, early warning of a disaster will be provided either through a loud hailer system or through other means including the local radio stations. • Emergency Services and other response agencies are dispatched to the location of a disaster. • All responding agencies implement their standard operating procedures for the disaster type. • Should extraordinary response be required, the Disaster Management Centre is activated and additional human and material resources dispatched in accordance with agreed procedures and Memoranda of Understanding. • The Provincial and National Disaster Management Centres are simultaneously notified of the disaster. • Additional national agencies like South African Police Services and the South African National Defence Force are activated as required. • Disaster assessments are completed and executive decisions on further response is made by the Disaster Management Centre in conjunction with political stakeholders and the community. • Adjustments to operational plans are made by Divisional Heads of Department as the situation warrants. • The Disaster Management Team, community leaders and other stakeholders in the affected area(s) lodge a fully fledged assessment e.g. nature/location of incidents, number of people affected, magnitude of damage/losses, risks/potential risks the incidents hosts, for surrounding(s) and or neighbours/adjacent areas, estimated population density and record all findings.

214

• •

Detailed reports and progress of the disaster response are provided to the Executive Mayor and the media through the relevant approved structures. Rehabilitation and when necessary reconstruction actions are developed once the disaster nears completion and communicated to stakeholders.

DISASTER MANAGEMENT CENTRE The establishment of the municipal Disaster Management Centre is a legislative requirement. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipal Disaster Management Centre is situated at 3 Hawley Road, Bedfordview. A Manager with the title: Manager: Disaster Management Centre is responsible for all the activities of the Centre on a corporate level. The Manager reports directly to the Head of the Centre. The Centre deals mainly with the following: • Implementation of a Geographical Information System • Volunteers training and Administration • Research • Corporate disaster response • Corporate risk reduction • Corporate early warning systems • Disaster financing • Managing of disasters, which include resource lists and logistical arrangements. VOLUNTEER POLICY In accordance with the Disaster Management Act (2002), volunteers may be appointed within a municipality. All volunteers are subjected to the published Regulations as they may be determined from time to time. All residents of Ekurhuleni qualify to be admitted as a Disaster Management volunteer providing that they meet the service specific requirements of the Unit they wish to volunteer in. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has resolved that disaster management volunteer units be established.

LIST OF HAZARD SPECIFIC PLANS FINALISED A disaster plan should contain various hazard specific response plans as well as mitigation plans. The inclusion of these documents, although required by the Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000, Section 26(g) would lead to the integrated development plan document becoming cumbersome. It is therefore necessary, in order to ensure that the integrated development plan is a user-friendly document and due to confidentiality of various matters contained in individual plans, to exclude the detail. A list of hazard specific plans, which have been prepared, are provided in order for stakeholders to identify planning gaps and opportunities. The list of hazard specific disaster plans below can and may change at short notice due to circumstances beyond the control of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. Disaster Plans have been completed for the following arrangements / hazards: • Rand Airport • Localised floods • Fires in Informal settlements • Dolomite and sinkhole response • O R Tambo International Airport (on airport)

215

• • • • •

Eskom Rand Water Sasol gas Petro SA Transnet (Metro Rail)

Plans in process of development and / or review include: • Municipal Contingency plans (Council Buildings) • Memoranda of understanding for cross function and boundary assistance • Communicable diseases response plan (draft)

TESTING AND REVIEW The testing of risk reduction activities and disaster response plans is vital in ensuring that systems and processes agreed to are implementable and workable. The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is committed to testing and reviewing its disaster management plans either as the need arises as a result of ongoing risk assessments or as a result of changing environmental and other factors. The municipality undertakes to test and review plans through a variety of tools at its disposal which include; • Meetings • Paper exercises • Hazard specific exercises • Stakeholder specific exercises • Regional exercises • Full scale exercises All exercises must result in improving the disaster response and risk reduction capacity of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to known disasters and identify planning gaps. CONCLUSION The Disaster Management Plan of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is a work in progress and will always be that due to the changing nature of society and the environment in which the Municipality is required to function. The plan is geared towards reducing disaster risk through sustainable developmental programmes. The plan is further geared towards increasing capacity to disaster response and increase the ability of manageability of disasters that occur. INSPECTION OF OVERALL PLAN All disaster management plans are available for inspection by relevant stakeholders and may be inspected at the Municipal Disaster Management Centre by appointment.

REFERENCES 1. Kesten, A. R. 2005. Dissertation. A Framework for Disaster Management Plans for Inclusion in the Integrated Development Plan of Municipalities in South Africa. University of the Free State – University Press. 2. South Africa. 2000. Local Government Municipal Systems Act 32 of 2000. Pretoria: Government Printer.

3. South Africa. 2002. Disaster Management Act 57 of 2002. Pretoria: Government Printer.

216

4. The Sphere Project. 2000. Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response. Musumeci, Aosta. Italy. 5. UNDMTP, 1992. Overview of Disaster Management. 2nd Edition. [Online] http://www.undmtp.org/english/Overview/overview.pdf. Accessed: 17 March 2004. 6. United Nations. 2003. UN-ISDR: Terminology on disaster risk reduction (working document), Updated 03.12.03. [Online] http://www.adrc.or.jp/publications/terminology/top.htm. Accessed, 16 March 2004. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

(http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005 (http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005) (http://www.unisdr.org/eng/library/lib-terminology-eng%20home.htm Accessed: 1 December 2005) Council resolution PS20/2001. Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, Act 117 of 1998. Pretoria: Government Printer.

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CHAPTER 4:

INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK

During the latter part of 2005, the Council adopted a new Service Delivery Model. This model was rolled out after the local government elections of 2006. New Mayoral Committee and Top Management Team have been established. The adopted model is reflected below

218

APPROVED FUNCTIONAL STRUCTURE City Manager

• •

Internal Audit

International/ Intergovernmental Relations Organisational Performance Management

Risk Management Communications and Marketing

OPERATIONS

STRATEGIC SERVICES

CORPORATE SERVICES

• Infrastructure Services •City Development Services •Economic Development •Planning & Decision Support (GIS) • GDS 2025 / IDP

•Health and Social Services •Sport, Recreation, Arts & Culture and Library Information Systems •Community / Public Safety •Housing •Customer Care Centres

Entities & Strategic Business Unit

•Finance •Legal & Administration Services

•RED’s •Brakpan Bus Company •ERWAT •Housing Dev Corp. •Fresh Produce Market

•Human Resources •Information Communication & Technology

•Environmental Services •Fleet & Facilities

219

CHAPTER 5: 5.1

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Background

Public Participation has been multi-faceted. Public Participation is achieved mainly through the Ward Committee System, as this is the formal communication forum, but various other processes supported participation in general. These are: •

Mayoral Roadshows



Developers Forums



Various Economic Sector Forums



IDP Representative Forums



Regional Ward Committee Meetings



Various community sector forums covering NGOs, CBOs etc.

Ward Committees are the main vehicles through which public participation is achieved. The Ward Committees had two meetings in the second half of 2006. The first series of meetings, one in each region, took place during July 2006 and focused on preparation for the Growth and Development Summit that took place on 1 and 2 September 2006. The second series of meetings, in October 2006, focused on giving feedback to the Ward Committees on the outcome of the Growth and Development Summit. They were required to evaluate all aspects contained in the IDP and Budget, and to submit an updated priority list. They were asked to indicate the three to five critical issues that would make the greatest impact on the Ward as there are limited resources and all cannot be addressed at once. All Ward Committees have met regularly and discussed various issues pertaining to development and implementation of projects. Municipal bus transport was provided from all areas for these meetings, to assist the communities with transport challenges. Through the abovementioned process, the following community priorities were determined as the most important and are categorised in terms of Underdeveloped, Developed and CBD and Industrial wards: UNDERDEVELOPED WARDS • Roads and Storm water- New and Maintain • Sport and Recreational Facilities • Housing Development • Traffic Calming • Street and High mast lighting • Water and Sanitation • Health Facilities • Electricity • Economic Development and Job creation • Side Walk Maintenance

220

DEVELOPED WARDS • Roads and Storm water Maintenance • Upgrading and Maintenance of Existing infrastructure and facilities • Traffic Calming • Grass cutting • Safety and Security • Electricity • Side Walk Maintenance • Street Lights • Environmental Management CBD AND BUSINESS WARDS • Safety and Security • General Maintenance – Roads, Electricity, Water and Sanitation, • Management of Informal Traders • Grass Cutting • Refuse removal / illegal dumping • Electricity supply For the first time in the history of Ekurhuleni, all 88 Wards are covered in terms of ward needs / priorities. See Chapter 2, section 2.3, for details. The Draft IDP and Multi Year Budget were published for comments and the following came out of this process:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Upgrading of Infrastructure Services Development of informal settlements Safety and security Housing Electricity Soccer Grounds/Sports fields Poverty Alleviation Multi Purpose Community Centres Upgrading of health facilities HIV/Aids alleviation Encourage investment(CBD) Efficient refuse removal system

The process for the election of new Ward Committees started during the latter part of 2006. The process focused on raising awareness in communities on the roles and responsibilities of the Ward Committees. Thereafter, nominations of community members to stand in the elections started. The schedule for the election of Ward Committees is reflected below:

221

SCHEDULE OF WARD MEETINGS TO ELECT WARD COMMITTEE MEMBERS EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY NORTHERN SERVICE DELIVERY REGION KEMPTON PARK SERVICE DELIVERY CENTRE

WARD NUMBER 1

COUNCILLOR

ADMINISTRATOR Moobe Mahasa

CLOSE OF NOMINATIONS 31 January 07

DATE OF MEETINGS 10 February 07

TIME OF MEETING 12h00

Lydia Mafanga

2

VENUE OF THE MEETING Tersia King Academy

Gregory Malebo

Moobe Mahasa

31 January 07

25 February 07

9h00

Bokamoso High School

3

Dorah Sebiloane

Kenneth Sitiba

31 January 07

10 February 07

8h30

Entshonalanga Primary School

4 5 6 7

LN Mohlaphamaswi Vincent Hlatshwayo Zacharia Mpongose Andrew Sebola

Ewert Maseko Joe Phaka Joe Phaka Joe Phaka

31 January 07 31 January 07 31 January 07 31 January 07

10 February 07 17 February 07 11 February 07 18 February 07

09h00 09h00 9h00 9h00

Sethokga Community Hall Ikusasa High School Rabasotho Hall Iqcayisivele High

8 9

Jafta Mngomezulu Elliot Tekane

Moobe Mahasa Moobe Mahasa

31 January 07 31 January 07

17 February 07 28 February 07

14h00 17h00

Isiziba Primary School Seotloana Primary School

10 11

Francinah Sehwana Bongani Zitha

Kenneth Sitiba Kenneth Sitiba

31 January 07 31 January 07

11 February 07 18 February 07

8h30 11h00

Sam Hlalele Jiyane High School

12

Alfred Sepirwa

Ewert Maseko

31 January 07

18 February 07

8h30

13

Andre Hunter

Rosemary Mofokeng

31 January 07

13 February 07

18h00

Phomolong Youth Centre Executive Committee Room

14 15

Thumbu Mahlangu Johanna Roos

Kenneth Sitiba Rosemary Mofokeng

31 January 07 31 January 07

15 February 07 21 February 07

17h00 17h00

Masisebenze High School Executive Committee Room K/P

222

16

Martina Hunter

Rosemary Mofokeng

31 January 07

20 February 07

18h00

Executive Committee Room K/P

17

Allan Keith Sauls

Rosemary Mofokeng

31 January 07

15 February

15h00

Executive Committee Room K/P

18

John Anticevich

Zakes Moloi

31 January 07

6th January

18h00

Edenvale Customer Care Centre

19

Barbara Naylor

Zakes Moloi

31 January 07

13 February 07

18H00

Edenvale Council Chamber

20

Odette Clark

Zakes Moloi

31 January 07

7th February

18h00

Bedfordview Library Auditorium

21

Tania Campbell

Ewert Maseko

31 January 2007

12 February 07

18h00

22

Johannes Louw

Zakes Moloi

31h January 07

8th February

18h00

Rest A While Centre Boksburg Customer Care Centre

23

Andre du Plessis

Rosemary Mofokeng

31 January 07

15 February 07

18h30

24

Benno Robinson

Ewert Maseko

31 January 2007

13 February 07

18h00

Ashton College Brentwood Park Laerskool Council Chambers Kempton/P

25

Gauta Mofokeng

Ewert Maseko

31 January 2007

24 February 07

08h30

Daveyton Customer Care Centre

27

Gerhardus Kriek

Ewert Maseko

31 January 07

12 February 07

18h00

Council Chambers Benoni CCC

223

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY EASTERN SERVICE DELIVERY REGION SPRINGS SERVICE DELIVERY CENTRE WARD NO

COUNCILLOR

OFFICIAL

DATE OF ELECTION 03/02/07

TIME OF ELECTION 9:00

VENUE OF MEETING

Kate Magakoe

CLOSE OF NOMINATIONS 31/01/07

26

Maria Zwane

28

Samuel Grolman

Eunice Ngobese

31/01/07

10/02/07

9:00

Benoni CCC

29

Ebrahim Motara

Eunice Ngobese

31/01/07

17/02/07

9:00

Actonville CCC

30 31

Kgomotso Rammego Kevin Noonan

Eunice Ngobese Sombu Ngwenya

31/01/07 31/01/07

24/02/07 17/02/07

9:00 10:00

Day Care Centre Brakpan CCC

65

Gladys Baleka

Kate Magakoe

31/01/07

10/02/07

9:00

Stompie Skosana Hall-Etwatwa

66

Pelisa Nkunjana

Kate Magakoe

31/01/07

17/02/07

9:00

Stompie Skosana Hall-Etwatwa

67

Mlungisi Rapolile

Kate Magakoe

31/01/07

24/02/07

9:00

Stompie Skosana Hall-Etwatwa

68

Nibadele Badela

Christine Mtsweni

31/01/07

03/02/07

9:00

Mbkwa Cindi Hall

69

Vivienne Chauke

Christine Mtsweni

31/01/07

10/02/07

9:00

Daveyton CCC

70

Thalitha Ditshego

Christine Mtsweni

31/01/07

17/02/07

9:00

Dumehlezi Primary School

71

Makgoba Kgopa

Christine Mtsweni

31/01/07

24/02/07

9:00

Marivate Hall Daveyton

72

John Nxumalo

Naima Kaloo Janoo

31/01/07

03/02/07

9:00

Bakerton Community Centre

73 74

Theodora Mokoena Gary Van Wyk

Sombu Ngwenya Sombu Ngwenya

31/01/07 31/01/07

10/02/07 24/02/07

9:00 9:00

Lindelani Hall Kingsway Brakpan CCC

Stompie Skosana Hall-Etwatwa

224

75

Dean Stone

Naima Kaloo Janoo

31/01/07

10/02/07

9:00

Springs CCC

76

Martinha Steyn

Naima Kaloo Janoo

31/01/07

17/02/07

9:00

Springs CCC

77

Fredda Padi

Nandi Hlongwane

31/01/07

04/02/07

8:00

Phelang School

78

Mlindelwa Kwelemtini

Nandi Hlongwane

31/01/07

11/02/07

9:00

79

Thoko Magagula

Nandi Hlongwane

31/01/07

18/02/07

9:00

Kwa – Thema Hall Ntokozweni Primary School

80

Dora Mlambo

Nandi Hlongwane

31/01/07

25/02/07

7:30

Xipu Ground

81

Chuene Bashele

Sombu Ngwenya

31/01/07

25/02/07

9:00

Langaville Primary School

82

Tshidiso Saul

Mduduzi Nhlabathi

31/01/07

04/02/07

9:00

Faranani Multi Purpose Centre

83 84

Lydia Thembekwayo Alletta Mashigo

Mduduzi Nhlabathi Mduduzi Nhlabathi

31/01/07 31/01/07

11/02/07 17/02/07

9:00 9:00

Mangosuthu P. School Tsakane CCC

85

Annah Mnguni

Mduduzi Nhlabathi

31/01/07

18/02/07

9:00

Thuthukani P. School

86

Theresia Mbonani

Grace Mthembu

31/01/07

03/02/07

9:00

Duduza Multi Purpose Centre

87

Tiny Mabena

Grace Mthembu

31/01/07

10/02/07

9:00

Duduza Library

88

Jake Ceronio

Grace Mthembu

31/01/07

17/02/07

9:00

Nigel Council Chambers

225

EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY SOUTHERN SERVICE DELIVERY REGION SPRINGS SERVICE DELIVERY CENTRE

WARD NO.

COUNCILLOR

ADMINISTRATOR

CLOSE OF NOMINATIONS

DATE OF ELECTIONS

32

M Mason

A Mathir

31 January 07

33

M. Mbhem

M Ngozi

34

D. Scholtz

35

VENUE OF THE MEETING

20 FEB 2007

TIME OF MEETINGS ELECTIONS 17:00pm

Boksburg Library Auditorium

31 January 07

25 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Transnet Hall ERP Mines

F Nyandana

31 January 07

8 MARCH 2007

18:00 pm

Reiger Park Civic Centre

M. Xakambana

M Ngozi

31 January 07

4 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Lusaka Hostel

36

C. Patterson

S Khumalo

31 January 07

8 FEB 2007

17:00 am

Germiston Civic Centre

37

B. Haipel

C Snyman

31 January 07

15 FEB 2007

17:00 pm

Alberton Civic Centre

38

M. Ansett

S Khumalo

31 January 07

22 FEB 2007

18:00 pm

Alberton Fire Station

39

R. Retief

S Khumalo

31 January 07

7 MARCH 2007

17:00 pm

Dinwiddie Hall

40

M. Maluleke

M. Ngozi

31 January 07

9:00AM

Leondale Hall

41

B. Nikani

M. Ngozi

31 January 07

4 MARCH 2007 4 FEB 2007

12:00pm

Leondale Hall

42

C. Bennetts

F Nyandana

31 January 07

21 FEB 2007

17:00 am

Scouts Hall Elspark

43 44

G. Phaleng P.Bodiba

F Nyandana R. Kekana

31 January 07 31 January 07

11 FEB 2007 4 MARCH 2007

9:00 am 9:00 am

Dawn Park Tennis Court Club House Vosloorus Civic Centre

45

E. Thekiso

R. Kekana

31 January 07

25 FEB 2007

9:00 pm

Vosloorus Civic Centre

226

46

N. Nciza

C. Mohlala

31 January 07

25 FEB 2007

14:00 pm

Nguni Hall

47

M. Siboza

R. Kekana

31 January 07

18 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Vosloorus Civic Centre

48

F. Mahloma

T. Nompalweni

31 January 07

4 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Kabelo Primary School

49

A. Moshia

S. Skosana

31 January 07

18 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Morojaneng Primary School

50

E. Ndima

S. Skosana

31 January 07

18 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Dukathole primary School

51

S. Dlomo

S. Skosana

31 January 07

9:00 am

Mokgobeng Primary School

52

L. Nkosi

I Ramashala

31 January 07

4 MARCH 2007 8 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Tokoza Auditorium Hall

53

Jarvis

S. Khumalo

31 January 07

26 FEB 2007

17:00 am

Eden Park Hall

54

M. Mabuza

T. Nompalweni

31 January 07

11 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Ukhanyiso Primary School

55

E. Masilo

S. Skosana

31 January 07

25 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Katlehong Technical School

56

C. Msibi

I. Ramashala

31 January 07

4 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

57

T. Nketle

I. Ramashala

31 January 07

18 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

58

G. Beta

C. Mohlala

31 January 07

25 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Thokoza Youth Centre Old age Home Thokoza Nhlodi Primary School

59

M. Ndebele

T. Nompalweni

31 January 07

9:00 am

Ponego Primary School

60

J. Thaba

C. Mohlala

31 January 07

25 MARCH 2007 25 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Ntombizodwa School

61.

M. Nkabi

I. Ramashala

31 January 07

11 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Realeboha Primary School

62

G. Sibeko

T. Nompalweni

31 January 07

18 FEB 2007

9:00 am

Manzini Primary School

63

M. Thibedi

C. Mohlala

31 January 07

18 MARCH 2007

9:00 am

Uhuru Park

64

F. Booi

R. Kekana

31 January 07

11 FEB 2007

9:00 am

J. D. Dumane Hall

227

All except two ward committees were elected by 31 March 2007. These newly elected Ward committees participated in their first meeting on the Draft IDP and Budget held on 31 March 2007. The purpose of these meetings, which took place in three regions in Ekurhuleni, focused on the IDP and Budget processes. It capacitated the ward committees in terms of the current IDP and Budget implementation as well as the proposals contained in the Draft IDP and Multi Year Budget. These meetings were very well attended. In fact it was the best attendance in a long time and participation was very good. The outstanding two ward committees have been elected and all 88 wards in Ekurhuleni have now elected ward committees. 5.2

Community Development Workers

The role of Ekurhuleni Municipality is to assist in the following: • • • • •

Removing the obstacles on matters relating to service delivery. Responding to referred matters of service delivery. Creating a working environment between the Ward Councillors and Ward Committees. The Ward Councillor is the elected representative of the Ward, and the only person who can convene public meetings. No CDW is allowed to convene Ward Committee and Public meetings to deliberate on matters of service delivery and development in the ward.

It should be noted that the provincial office is responsible, as their employer, for providing a regional coordinator for CDWs.. The Municipality plays a role as a conduit to access the community through participatory government and intergovernmental relations. Municipalities are therefore a workplace for CDWs. Moreover, the project supplements the voluntary work of Ward Committees in the respective areas. Working Relationship with Ward Councillors and Committees The inception of CDWs in selected Wards prompted the creation of a working environment with Ward Committees. In January 2005, there were regional meetings with MMCs, Ward Councillors, CDWcadets, as well as officials from Provincial DLG and Ward Committees, to express expectations of working relationships between these vehicles of governance. It was agreed that the following working principles would prevail: 1. The CDW to attend the Ward Committee meetings and report on the challenges facing the Ward. 2. To assist with an investigation into matters raised at Ward Committee meetings with regard to service delivery issues. 3. To communicate with the Ward Councillor and Committee members on all issues pertaining to the challenges of the Ward. 4. To conduct research, at the request of the Ward Councillor and/or Ward Committee, on issues relating to service delivery in the Ward, and advise thereon. 5. To participate in community programmes initiated by the Ward Committee and/or the Municipality. 6. To contribute inputs towards the compilation of Ward IDP programmes and projects. 7. To strengthen the relationship between the CDWs and the Municipality’s Councillors, Ward Committees, local CBOs and NGOs.

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Project coordination and Recruitment The project is coordinated as follows: National • The Department of Public Service (DPSA) and Department of Provincial and Local Government (DPLG) are leading the process. • The National task team was established, comprising of SALGA. LGWSETA, DPSA, DPLG, GCIS, Treasury, Department of Labour and provincial role players. It meets monthly to deliberate on policy, progress and interventions. Provincial • The Steering Committee, comprising of all Municipalities (Metropolitan and Districts), and Provincial Departments, oversees the running of the project. • Monthly meetings are held with CDW cadets to exchange ideas, challenges, constraints and interventions in relation to resources and other logistical and administrative matters. • The Steering Committee monthly report, together with the Departmental progress report, is submitted to the Premier’s Coordinating Forum and Executive Committee through the MEC for Local Government. The recruitment is informed through the study commissioned by the Provincial DLG to research areas that are hardest hit by poverty. The study has identified several areas across Ekurhuleni Municipality. It is important to indicate that not all Wards or areas have the full benefit of CDW deployment. However, more areas will be covered as the project is phased in.

The Provincial Department has set the following criteria and process for selection: 1. The qualifications are experience and knowledge of community background and active participation in community activities and programmes. 2. Educational qualifications: Grade 11 (minimum). 3. The advertisements for the posts are displayed at local libraries, MPCC and government buildings and offices. 4. Receive Curriculum Vitae (CVs) forms from applicants. 5. Screen the CVs to be line with the area of deployment. 6. Confirm with the Municipality the area and/or the Ward affected (in our case, the Office of the Speaker). 7. Communicate with the Councillor to ascertain that applicants are from the area or Ward. 8. Appoint the person and invite the person to induction training. 9. The cadets are thereafter placed on a 12-month learnership. After undergoing the learnerships, successful CDWs are eligible for employment and full deployment in the public service. It is important to indicate that the CDW project is an enhancement of participatory governance and a vehicle for addressing service delivery bottlenecks on a daily basis. The contribution of CDW towards creating a better service delivery machine for government cannot therefore be overemphasized. The challenge for the Municipality is to ensure good working relationships between the Council, Ward Committees and Ward Councillors so that systems for referral and response to issues of service delivery are improved to “unblock the blockages”.

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CHAPTER 6:

METROPOLITAN SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality completed and adopted a Spatial Development Framework for the Ekurhuleni area in June 2005, as part of its integrated Development Plan (IDP). The Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF) is a plan outlining the desired spatial development of the metropolitan area as contemplated in Section 25(e) of the Municipal Systems Act (Act 32 of 2000). It also highlights priority investment and development areas and will serve as a guide to decision-makers and investors. What should be emphasised regarding the SDF is that it is an integral component of the IDP and translates this plan into its spatial implications and guidelines for development. It is therefore not a tool to be used in isolation, but should support decision-making within the context of the IDP. The SDF should furthermore not be interpreted as a blueprint or master plan aimed at controlling physical development but rather as a framework giving strategic guidance in respect of the location and nature of anticipated future development in the Municipality. Desired patterns of land use are indicated, although room still exists for interpretation and further refinement. The SDF is development orientated, to allow for growth and changing circumstances, and to promote investor confidence in the area. But most importantly the SDF endeavours to attain the millennium development goals (MDGs) through public investment in public goods and facilities where there is underdevelopment or development is non existent, like in health and sanitation; the halving of poverty and joblessness by 2014; as well as the eradication of homelessness by 2014. The SDF represents the first of three levels of plans to be established in the Ekurhuleni Metro. The three levels of plans are as follows: Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework; addressing metropolitan wide issues and providing broad, overall development guidelines; Regional Spatial Development Frameworks; these will be formulated for the three Service Delivery Regions (SDRs) namely North, East and South. These frameworks will refine the Metropolitan SDF proposals and will provide more detailed development guidelines; and Local Spatial Development Frameworks; these will be formulated for designated areas within each Service Delivery Region. These plans will provide detailed development guidelines to address specific issues, in line with the SDR Frameworks. FACTUAL OVERVIEW The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality is one of six local authorities and one of three metropolitan municipalities in Gauteng Province. According to the 1996 Population Census the population in Ekurhuleni was approximately 2,0 million. This figure increased to 2,38 million (2.7% growth per annum) by 2002 based on the most recent counts and the updating of the figures. This related to an increment of 59 600 people or 17 000 dwelling units per annum (since 1996). The Ekurhuleni Metro plays a fundamental role in the economy of Gauteng province and it forms part of the core economic focus area situated between the City of Johannesburg, City of Tshwane and OR Tambo International Airport. It contributes approximately 25% to the Gross Geographic Product of Gauteng. The strategic importance of the Ekurhuleni area is furthermore emphasised by the fact that four Blue IQ projects fall within the Ekurhuleni Metro area, namely:• • • •

The Gautrain Rail which links with OR Tambo International Airport and which also has an access station in the Rhodesfield area; The OR Tambo International Airport; The Industrial Development Zone east of the airport; The Alrode/Wadeville corridor, situated in the southern portion of the Ekurhuleni Metro.

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One of the most important features of the Ekurhuleni Metro is its strategic location in the Gauteng national, and even sub-continental, context. It represents the point of convergence of Southern Africa’s entire railway infrastructure, since all the main line systems converge at Germiston Station. Ekurhuleni Metro is furthermore served by a radial freeway network which links Ekurhuleni to virtually all major destinations in South Africa – the R21 to the City of Tshwane, Limpopo Province and Zimbabwe; the N12 and N17 to Mpumalanga Province, Mozambique and Swaziland; the N3 to KwaZulu-Natal and Lesotho as well as the R26 to the Free State and Western Cape Province (Cape Town). The OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA), which is the point of entrance for almost all foreign visitors to Southern Africa, is also situated in Ekurhuleni and is a very prominent feature in terms of the secondary activities (manufacture, warehousing etc.) it draws to the area. SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK PROPOSALS The section below provides a synopsis of the proposals put forward by the SDF and relates to the legend of the SDF. It is however important to refer to the detailed SDF document for the concept (Map 1) and principles behind the SDF, as well as more detail regarding these proposals. The proposals are (refer to Map 2); 1) Implementation of an Urban development Boundary (UDB): It is important to note that an UDB should not be seen as a rigid regulatory mechanism that will stifle all development initiatives. It is rather a policy statement aimed at redirecting patterns of growth and forcing all parties involved in development to reconsider all options available – including opportunities within the urban boundary. This is a line put in place for the next few years, but obviously, as circumstances demand it, it can/will be amended. The following guidelines for development will apply: Land used within the UDB: Land use within the UDB which is consistent with the relevant local precinct plan, the spatial development framework, land use management plan and/or town planning scheme, would be permitted subject to the normal procedures and legislation e.g. environmental considerations, transportation requirements etc. Note that the UDB does not imply that the entire area can/should be allowed to develop and that development rights are therefore guaranteed. Factors such as timing availability of services, the environment etc. must and should be applicable when considering an application within the boundary. Land used outside the UDB: Land uses that are rural in nature would be more desirable, and should therefore be promoted outside the UDB, rather than inside it. Where applicable, these will also have to be in line with provincial policies e.g. GDACE policy on subdivision of land etc. Land use complying with the following criteria should be allowed in the rural areas outside the UDB: a) b) c) d) e) f) g)

Extensive agriculture; Conservation area/ Nature Reserves; Tourism and related activities e.g. curio markets; Recreational facilities e.g. hiking trials/hotels/game lodges; Farm stalls and home industries; Rural residential uses/Agricultural holdings in specific areas; Any other related development/service

Provided that the proposed development/service h) primarily services the local market; and/or i) is resource based; and/or

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j)

is located at a defined and approved service delivery centre

Developments/services not complying with the criteria set in (a) – (f) may thus only be allowed if they comply with criteria (h). (i) and (j). Note that applications outside the UDB that do not comply with the criteria are not prohibited, but specific measures will apply. Please refer to the detailed SDF document in this regard. 2. Peripheral Uses: The area directly outside the UDB is earmarked for this use. It is envisaged that a transition area will develop around the Urban Development Boundary which may comprise a range of different peripheral uses. It is proposed that low intensity land uses like agricultural holdings, rural residential uses, low intensity service industries (typically those occurring on agricultural holdings) as well as urban agriculture be promoted in the fringe area around the Urban Development Boundary. These uses should support and protect the Urban Development Boundary and serve as a barrier for the future expansion of the urban environment. It is also necessary to utilise opportunities optimally for urban agriculture in this area, especially those areas near to disadvantaged communities. The Sentraland area to the north of Daveyton-Etwata holds some potential for LED development. 3) Extensive Agriculture: They are the areas outside the UDB and peripheral use zone, where extensive agriculture should be protected and promoted. The provision of services, such as health, education, retail, etc. should also be catered for in these areas. 4) Activity Nodes or Areas: There is a wide range of activity nodes or areas accommodating a variety of activities in Ekurhuleni. The Metropolitan Activity Area can be divided into four main core areas, namely: •

• • •

Greater OR Tambo International Activity Area; which includes the three Blue IQ projects (ORTIA, Gautrain, and the IDZ), the CBDs of Edenvale and Kempton Park, the proposed corporate office precinct in Rhodesfield, the industrial complex of Isando, Spartan and Jet Park, the R21 Development Corridor and the Olifantsfontein-Clayville industrial area. Central Activity Belt; comprising the CBDs of Germiston, Boksburg, and Benoni as well as mining activities and the industrial areas of Germiston, Anderbolt and Benoni South. Alrode-Wadeville Corridor, which includes the industrial area of Wadeville and Alrode and is already a Blue IQ project. Far East Activity Belt; comprising the CBDs of Brakpan, Springs and Nigel as well as the industrial area of Vulcania, New Era, Nuffield and the Vorsterskroon and Pretoriusstad industrial areas around Nigel which are the subject of an Industrial Revitalisation Strategy.

In terms of retail, the existing nine Central Business Districts should be maintained and strengthened, to protect the public and private investment in these areas. The implementation of Business Improvement Districts is proposed as a strategy to improve safety, security and overall environmental improvement in the CBDs. Furthermore, the Ekurhuleni Retail Study provides some guidelines towards the development of retail facilities. The industrial area includes the full range of industrial activities from heavy and toxic industries to light industrial, commercial and warehousing activities. Within the context of the four Core Areas identified, the functional specialisation of these industrial areas should be promoted, both in terms of local and regional context. The triangular area around the OR Tambo International Airport represents a core focus area for Ekurhuleni Large portions of land to the south and east of ORTIA are still

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undeveloped/underdeveloped enhancing the potential for large-scale development/redevelopment of these areas. These developments could be used to establish the identity of the Ekurhuleni Metro in future. The agricultural holdings of Boksburg directly to the south of the ORTIA in particular, have the potential to be developed in such a way that they promote the identity of Ekurhuleni. Due to its proximity to ORTIA, there will, however, be a limit on the height of development and the type of development (noise zones) that will be allowed. The same applies to the portion of the R21 corridor to the north of ORTIA. The area south of ORTIA already holds the East Rand Mall and associated developments. It is proposed that this area be developed for mixed use purposes mainly focused on retail and office developments. The area is highly visual (especially from the surrounding freeway network), and therefore care should be taken that all developments in the area are aesthetically attractive in order to contribute towards establishing the identity and image of the new Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. An Economic Strategic Triangle Study that encompasses the ORTIA area and the CBDs of Germiston, Boksburg, Benoni and Kempton Park has been conducted to give development direction within this core area. In support of this, a Development Corridor Study has also been completed and adopted. It outlines how this core area and others alluded to above, can be linked to the rest of Ekurhuleni. 5) Infill Development Priority Areas: There are five main areas that are a priority in terms of infill development (utilising undeveloped/under-developed land in central locations). These are the areas previously occupied by mining activities in the vicinity of Germiston, around the central part of Boksburg, to the east of Benoni, and to the northwest and west of the Springs CBD. These five pockets of land are strategically located within the core areas of the EMM and some detailed work has already been done on the suitability for development of these areas. 6) Strategic Development Areas: As far as future residential expansion is concerned, eight major precincts have been have been identified, namely; • Olifantsfontein/Clayville (linking to the Midrand area); • Esselenpark/Kaalfontein. This forms part of the Tembisa -ORTIA corridor as it is served by both the commuter railway line and route K105; • Pomona/Benoni North (area Northeast of ORTIA); • Area north and northwest of Daveyton; • KwaThema-Duduza; • Tsakane West; • Boksburg South; and • Katorus South. 7) Service Upgrading Priority Areas: The EMM should focus its capital expenditure and operational programmes on upgrading services and facilities in previously disadvantaged areas to levels comparable with those of the rest of the Metro. There are four major complexes of disadvantaged communities earmarked as Service Upgrading Priority Areas namely; • Tembisa; • Katorus; • Kwatsadusa; and • Daveyton/Etwatwa. 8) Regional Open Space: Regional Open Space system is proposed for the metropolitan area and has been schematically illustrated in the SDF. It must be noted that only the Northern Environmental Management Framework has been completed. The formulation of the

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Environmental Management Frameworks for the ESDR and SSDR are currently underway and once conducted will form a detailed Strategic Environmental Assessment for the Ekurhuleni region, to enhance the detail pertaining to the Regional Open Space System. 9) Mining: There are major concentrations of mining land in the area which include the area in the Reiger Park vicinity, the area to the east of Benoni, Western Germiston, the area to the east of Springs and three sites in the vicinity of the Kwatsaduza complex. Theses areas have been earmarked for mining-related activities. Mining related activities also include Quarrying operations. 10) Transportation: The land use framework as highlighted above must be supported by a transportation network and services in order for it to materialise. The following is a summary of the main features in this regard: a) Rail: The entire urban complex of the EMM is served by rail infrastructure, which links the disadvantaged communities of Tembisa, Katorus and Daveyton-Etwatwa to all four core areas of economic activity identified. In fact, the railway line is central to each of the four core areas. In line with the national and provincial policy guidelines, the railway service should represent the core service around which public transport is provided. It also presents an opportunity for Transit Orientated Development, which essentially means that the layout and design of land use around the railway stations should be orientated towards promoting the utilisation of the railway system. The rail infrastructure also links to Gautrain which provides for an Ekurhuleni commuter station at Rhodesfield. b) Road: Freeway Network: the freeway network ensures good regional accessibility and links Ekurhuleni to all major centres in the Southern African context. The current freeway network is, however, mainly radially orientated towards Greater Johannesburg. The priority expansion of the freeway network in Ekurhuleni revolves around the PWV 15 which will unlock the development opportunities to the east of ORTIA; route PWV 13 which will directly link ORTIA with the N3 and which will improve accessibility of the Central Activity Belt around Boksburg; and route PWV 14 which will link Germiston and the Central Activity Belt to ORTIA, and the R21 and N12 freeways. Second Order Road Network: The main objective of the Network is to: • Facilitate movement in the metropolitan area in the north-south and east-west directions; • Link residential areas to one another and to the core areas of economic activity; • Link areas of economic activity to one another; • Promote mixed use and high density developments adjacent to these routes (subject to road access management requirements); • Promote transport along these routes as a priority, Six main north-south desire lines have been identified, these include: •

Route KI17/KI27/K123 which runs from Tembisa through the Isando-Spartan complex, through the Central Activity Belt near Germiston station and surrounding industrial areas, through the Wadeville industrial area, linking to Vosloorus and Katlehong, from where it links to Alrode and further towards Alberton CBD;

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• • • •



Route K105/K90/K131 which links to the following areas: Tembisa/Kempton Park CBD, Isando, Spartan, Jet Park, ORTIA, Boksburg CBD, Sunward Park and Vosloorus; K155 which is the extension of R21, PWV15, and passes through Anderbolt, Van Dyk Park, Vosloorus, Thokoza and Alberton; K109 which links the northern suburbs of Benoni to the Benoni CBD and Benoni South industrial area, from where it stretches southwards past Tsakanae and eventually links up with the N3 freeway; K161/K154, which serves Daveyton-Etwata from where it passes through two infill priority areas, southwards towards the Springs CBD, and the New Era industrial area, then past the communities of KwaThema, Duduza and Nigel, where it links to the N3. This route would serve as the central spine around which the Far East Activity Belt could be developed in the future; and K175 which links Etwatwa to Springs CBD.

In an east-west direction there are three priority desire lines: • K68 which would serve to link the Daveyton-Etwatwa complex to the ORTIA Activity Area, and which would also serve the Strategic Development Areas; • K106 which would link the Daveyton-Etwatwa complex to the Central Activity Belt including Benoni, Boksburg and Germiston; • K132/K163/K116, which would link Springs to Brakpan CBD (Far East Activity Belt) and then to Boksburg (Central Activity Belt). IMPLEMENTATION AND PRIORITISATION The SDF provides some strategic guidance as to where the EMM should focus in the allocation of its resources. In order to assist with prioritisation of projects and allocation of resources, five main elements of the SDF were isolated as geographic entities, which could give guidance as to where the priority capital investment areas lie. Map 2 also provides a graphical illustration of the spatial distribution of these entities, which are: • Core Economic Areas; • Infill Priority Areas; • Strategic Development Areas; • Service Upgrading Priority Areas; • The Urban Edge. The MSDF is supported by a number of sector/ topic specific planning documents, including the following: • Core Economic Triangle Study (Map 3); • Corridor Study (Map 3); and • Ekurhuleni Regional Retail Strategy. In addition the EMM is currently in the process of drafting detailed plans for the OR Tambo International Airport and surrounding areas in co-operation with ACSA and other role players. The EMM is also currently preparing a Density Framework which will further inform a guide to its LSDFs. The reviews of the Spatial Development Frameworks for the three Service Delivery Regions in Ekurhuleni (North, South and East) are due for completion by July 2007. A number of local spatial development frameworks have been completed and the formulation and revision of other identified LSDFs for 2007/2008 will follow in earnest. Although the Spatial Development Framework becomes binding on the Municipality through the adoption of the Integrated Development Plan, the MSDF (highest level of plan in EMM), must only be

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used as a guide, and not to assess development applications, as it is not site-specific. LSDFs are used for the valuation of development applications. Where there is no LSDF, the applicable RSDF is used. This Executive Summary of the Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework aims to provide a basic outline of the MSDF document at a very conceptual level of abstraction. The attainment of the millennium development goals (MDGs) is an overarching thread throughout the MSDF, in particular the improvements to the former deprived townships, where there are poverty concentrations, as well as the informal settlements. For further information it will be necessary to refer to the complete MSDF document, RSDF documents and other planning documents and strategies referred to above. Attached Maps: Map 1: Conceptual Spatial Structure Map 2: Spatial Development Framework Map 3: Economic Development Triangle and Corridors

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CHAPTER 7:

IDP PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS

The EMM Growth and Development Strategy 2025 (GDS 2025) set milestones and deliverables that have to be achieved through short and medium term planning and implementation. This will happen through the IDP process. Each department is responsible for certain specific deliverables and milestones which are broken down into measurable smaller targets over the 5 year cycle of the IDP. The matters raised at the Growth and Development Summit are being dealt with through these plans and programmes Implementation will take place in line with the National Key Performance Areas and Institutional Transformation which is covered in Chapter 8. All departmental plans have been approved by the various Portfolio Committees to ensure political oversight in the process. The various Landscapes with all the respective focus areas are arranged to reflect the following: • EMM GDS Focus Area • Department • Definition of service • Definition of customer • Service Level planned • Backlogs • Planned Improvements in service With the above-mentioned background information the following provide the deliverables: • Strategic Objectives • Key Performance Indicators • Measurable Performance Targets / Actions • Annual Targets and Deadlines.

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7.1

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICE DELIVERY

7.1.1

FOCUS AREA 1: CLEAR CITY IDENTITY

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area

CLEAR CITY IDENTITY

Service Delivery Department

CITY DEVELOPMENT

Definition of Service

In pursuance of a metropolitan city identity, the function of Development Planning within the EMM is administered as follows and includes: • Spatial Planning • Land Use Management • Planning Information Management These services are the Key Performance Areas (KPAs) of the department and they include support services and financial management. The following are the services rendered by EMM: Development Planning: • Preparation, development and review of Spatial Development Frameworks. • Formulation of spatial development policies & strategies. • Formulation of spatial development strategic projects . • Liaison with stakeholders at Spatial Planning level. • Provision of spatial planning information • The establishment of a uniform Land Use Management System • Uniform implementation of a development planning applications administrative system. • Streamline mechanisms and committees for decision-making on development planning applications. • Formulation of uniform and integrated policies. • To process applications speedily. • Effective control and promotion of land use development. • Provision of Development advice. • Extension and enhancement of the Planning and GIS database. • Provision of relevant GIS data/information. • Specific GIS research/projects • Provision for land surveying and registration. • GIS support and analysis.

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Definition of Customer

Spatial Form Criteria (MSDF Objectives) Backlog Figures

Planned improvements in Service

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Frameworks for GIS operations. Administrative support to the department & facilitate departmental transformation process. Provision of archive system to the department. Consultants, developers, estate agents Councillors and EMM community EMM staff (Other EMM departments and divisions) Neighbouring municipalities Provincial and National Government Parastatals Property owners Other stakeholders Creation of a single, uniform identity for Ekurhuleni metro (unicity).

As one of the Special Infrastructure Investment Projects, the Strategic core economic triangle that attempts to achieve a clear identity for EMM is a project which is strategic in that it encourages organic growth by shifting perceptions about areas and changing the image of the metropolitan area. Furthermore, the project has a potential of attracting much needed investment by promoting an urban image and boosting civic pride, which includes heritage sites, monuments etc. Specific Implementation Programmes that will result in a clear identity that EMM aspires to include: o The Gautrain Construction and related development adjacent to the ORTIA o Successful development of the R21 Corridor (linking with Germiston and Kathorus). o Successful development of the Germiston Government Precinct o Subsidy-linked housing development along the mining belt especially around railway stations and intermodal public transport hubs in line with principles espoused in the Breaking New Ground (BNG). o Successful fulfillment of UDZs in line with approved strategy. o Clearing of status and Implementation of the ORTIA IDZ o Successful implementation of the core economic development triangle proposals. Specific projects: • •

Review of Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF) Formulation of outstanding Local Spatial Development Frameworks (LSDFs):

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o o o o o

Germiston CBD LSDF Urban Development Zone (Germiston and Kempton Park) Approval of land use applications that promote the development of the approved development triangle. The promotion and support of infrastructure projects within the development triangle.

. A unitary, integrated metro focused on an efficient and functional city system and aimed at attaining economies of scale. Desired spatial configuration EMM GDS Landscape EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

PHYSICAL LANDSCAPE CLEAR CITY IDENTITY Communications and Marketing :KPA - Marketing and Advertising To provide and maintain excellent Marketing Communications services to both external and internal clients All Ekurhuleni Stakeholders  Potential Investors  Businesses in Ekurhuleni  Current Investors  Rate Payers  Tourists  Developers  Ekurhuleni Departments  Partners (E.g. GEDA, DTI, TISA SEDA, Blue IQ) Potential Investors & Developers : Increase external awareness of the Ekurhuleni brand Businesses in Ekurhuleni : Increase awareness & boost pride of target groups Current Investors : Increase awareness and present opportunities Partners : Programme for embassies & formal, regular meetings with other stakeholders - synergy Rate Payers: Increase external awareness of the Ekurhuleni brand Internal Departments : Unique & effective Marketing programmes, aiding branding strategy motives N/A • Increase external awareness of the Ekurhuleni brand • Increased awareness of EMM brand across the spectrum of Marketing Communications • Increased awareness of EMM with target groups • Visibility Increase

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Strategic Objectives To promote the EMM as a destination and a service organisation through Advertising

Key Performance Indicators Brand Awareness

To ensure all stakeholders understand the EMM brand offering and rally support around the brand

Strong brand clarity and recognition

To re-enforce the EMM brand and visibility as a service organisation

Added value in the form of extended visibility, awareness, acceptance and support of the Ekurhuleni brand.

Measurable Performance Targets / Actions •

Develop and implement new advertising campaigns for profiling the EMM and region utilising various mediums



Conduct post campaign research to identify shifts in awareness levels (biennially) if needed, adjust advertising messages and vehicle.

2007/8



Promote Brand Internalisation through workshops with all staff Develop and promote the EMM Brand film

2007/2008

• •

• To enhance the image of the EMM throughout the region and to all audiences in and outside the region.

Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing

2007/2008 Develop and implement a Services Marketing Strategy, to support, complement and enhance the reach of corporate and EMM departmental advertising campaigns. To launch/showcase new product offerings;

To ensure visibility of the EMM brand through the region.

Corporate signage & CCC branding : Project manage the design, production and placement of corporate signage at all venues throughout the Ekurhuleni area

2007/2008

Regard for and understanding of service levels of the Metro

Services Marketing: To improve consumer's experience of the service they receive from the Metro and to launch new product offerings - strategic projects of EMM.

2007/2008

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7.1.2

FOCUS AREA 2: SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT

CITY DEVELOPMENT The function of Development Planning within the EMM is administered as follows and includes: • Spatial Planning • Land Use Management • Geographic Information System These services are the KPAs of the Development Planning and they include support services and financial management. The following are the services rendered by EMM: Development Planning: • Preparation, development and review of Spatial Development Frameworks. • Formulation of spatial development policies/strategies. • Formulation of spatial development strategic projects and guidance. • Liaison with stakeholders at Spatial Planning level. • Provision of spatial planning information • Urban design as part of urban renewal strategy. • The establishment of a uniform Land Use Management System • Uniform implementation of an application administrative system. • Streamline mechanisms and committees for decision-making on development planning applications. • Formulation of uniform and integrated policies. • To process applications speedily. • Effective control of land use. • Provision of Development advice. • Extension and enhancement of the Planning and GIS database. • Provision of relevant GIS data/information. • Specific GIS research/projects • Provision for land surveying and registration. • GIS support and analysis. • Frameworks for GIS operations.

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Definition of Customer

Spatial Form Criteria (MSDF Objectives)

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• Backlog Figures

Administrative support to the department & facilitate departmental transformation process. Provision of archive system to the department. Training and development. Formulation of Employment Equity Policy in line with the Metro Policy. Consultants, developers, estate agents Councillors and EMM community EMM staff Neighbouring municipalities Provincial and National Government Parastals Property owners Other stakeholders Optimization of job creation capacity of the formal economy in the region by promoting sectoral specialization and by linking these activity nodes to one another. Integration of the disadvantaged communities of the EMM into the urban fabric by way of : o Infill development on strategically located vacant land. o Promotion of corridor development along the main linkages between these communities and the major concentrations of job opportunities. Development of a well-defined system of activity nodes/areas which include retail, industrial and commercial activities which holds the bulk of economic activity within the metropolitan area. Promotion of sustainable public transport by: o Providing public transport along all the main corridors. o Promoting mixed uses, high density development along the corridors. o Promoting Transit Oriented Development along the main railway infrastructure. Establishment of a full range of services within convenient distance for the entire community by way of Multipurpose Customer Care Centres.

Residential Retail Commercial Industrial Other: Townships Offices Home Enterprises and crèche

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Planned improvements in Service

1. Of paramount importance is the complete review and overhauling of the metropolitan spatial development framework (MSDF) in terms of the stipulates of the applicable statutory provisions. Through the review process important issues will be addressed which will include to: To achieve improved accessibility and mobility throughout the metropolitan area, with a strong east-west corridor along the N12/N17 freeways and North-South corridor along the R21 freeway. Infill development on strategically located vacant and underutilized land between the urban core and peripheral townships as well as a managed and respected urban edge. 2. Special Projects • Cinderella Prison • Completion of the land audit • Implementation of the LSDFs • Implementation of SIIPS 3. LSDFs have an emphasis on urban regeneration and spatial integration. The projects are outline regionally: ESDR • Springs CBD LSDF • Brakpan CBD • Carnival corridor development area • Benoni CBD • Sinaba Stadium area NSDR • Benoni Agricultural Holdings LSDF • Rynfields LSDF • ORTIA Environments LSDFs SSDR • LSDF 1 Central Germiston: • Boksburg LSDF • Reiger Park LSDF • Tshongweni LSDF: • Vosloorus Hospital Area LSDF Demarcate Street trading areas Address Informal settlements issues Formulate Densification Framework

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Approval of the East and West Mining Belt studies (prepared for the Housing Dept) Pursue the initiation of the dolomite study in consultation with Municipal Infrastructure Urban development and Management (Mayoral priority) • Proclamation of street trading areas • Land release accelerated • Gremiston regeneration and renewal as centre of head Quarters • Development and investment linked to land acquisitions • Densification and dedensification planning. Good Governance • Focus will be on improving turnaround times of the process and approval of development applications. • Capacitate municipal planners to be able to use the tracking system optimally in order to give accurate and reliable information speedily. • Capacity building of municipal planners on legislation so that they are able to provide information that is ensures compliance with legislation and enforcement of policies and by-laws. • Public Education on spatial development frameworks awareness. • More inclusive process of the Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP). • HIV/AIDS • Human Resources Management related issues such as: o Training and Development o o

Equity Plan and Transformation Process Financial Management, Risk and Asset Management

Specific Programmes • Ongoing training on law enforcement. • Updating and populating data sets. • Updating town planning schemes. • Policy advocacy to use legislation to reverse past spatial and land development inequities. • SDF awareness of spatial plans

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KPA: LAND USE MANAGEMENT Strategic Objectives Establish a uniform Land Use Management System

Key Performance Indicators Implement a Land Use Management System as approved by City Development Portfolio Committee in view of the non-implementation of the Gauteng Planning and Development Act 3 0f 2003.

Measurable Performance Annual Targets + targets / Actions Deadlines Drafting of standard set of Scheme May 2007 Clauses: Appoint Service provider. Finalise Ekurhuleni Scheme January 2008 Clauses and submit to City Development Portfolio for approval.

Establish a uniform Land Use Management System continued…

Updating data for Scheme Maps and implementation of approved Ekurhuleni Scheme Clauses per CCC Area.

June 2008

Legal Compliance of new June 2009 Ekurhuleni Land Use Management Scheme: - advertisements, public participation and public meetings, review and amendments to Schemes, Gazetting. Uniform Implementation of an application administration system

Standardisation of procedures relating to applications and reports

Conditions of approval and conditions of establishment

Sept 2007

Compilation of procedure file

October 2007

Standard letters March 2008 Inconsistencies

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June 2008

Streamline mechanisms and committees for decision-making on town planning applications

Revision of application fees

Revisions of delegations

Revision of Planning procedures Establishment and Capacitation of decision-making bodies (Development Planning course for all PC and DT Councilors).

To formulate uniform / integrated policies

Annual review of standard application fees.

Jun 2008

Review fee structure in line with When the regulations get new planning legislation promulgated Review delegation structure of all When the regulations get decision-making bodies and promulgated persons in line with new planning legislation Review of planning procedures with When the regulations get new legislation promulgated Finalise planning and sign any Dec 2007 applicable agreements. Implementation of course

Mar 2008

Alignment of Tribunal with new legislation.

When the regulations get promulgated

Alignment of Portfolio Committee with new legislation PC Resolution

When the regulations get promulgated Aug 2007

Mayoral resolution.

Oct 2007

Revision of current policy.

Draft policy

Sept 2007

- Rezoning on farm land policy

Participation

Dec 2007

- Accommodation establishment policy

PC support

Jan 2008

Approval

Mar 2008

Rescind policies not in use

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To process applications speedily

Further standardisation of policy/policy making

Draft policy

Dec 2007

- Parking Policy

Participation

Mar 2008

- Policy on provision of public open space

PC support

Apr 2008

Reduction of backlog

Approval Eradication of old incomplete applications.

Jun 2008 Dec 2007

Establish the extent of backlog

Jul 2007

Approval of procedure to deal with Aug 2007 the backlog Review delegated item proformas July 2007

Improve turnaround times

Annual report Implementation of an electronic application processing system

Improve productivity

Establish a procedure to avoid last Jun 2008 minute cancellation of hearings. Review application finalisation Sept 2008 targets (after implementation of new processing system)

Compile & submit council applications

Capacitation of staff and politicians on new procedures as per new legislation Phase 1: 4 applications Phase 2: 4 applications

Jun 2008 Jun 2008

Once the regulations are promulgated. Dec 2007 Jun 2008

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To control land use effectively

Training of development inspectors

Timeous response to complaints

Explore options to Improve the process of prosecution Public awareness campaign Undertake focused surveys

To provide development advice

To provide the necessary land use management information and input as required both internally and externally.

Determine the procedure for dealing with encroachments.

Determine the procedure for dealing with reported encroachments.

Determine the effects of encroachments on EMM processes.

Peace officer training for new inspectors.

Dec 2007

In-house training on procedures 30% of complaints to be successfully dealt with-annual report.

Aug 2007 Jun 2008

PC resolution

Dec 2007

Undertake public awareness campaign Identify hot spots.

Jun 2008 Feb 2008

Undertake surveys

April 2008

Refer for prosecution Jun 2008 To address queries Ongoing Comment on applications from Ongoing surrounding municipalities Give input on items from other Ongoing departments Provide all the land use Ongoing information at information counters Write a Submission to CDP December 2007 Committee and obtain a formal resolution on the role of CDP on encroachments. Provide an Analysis of the December 2007 impact of encroachments on EMM functions and responsibilities.

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Investigate preventative measures to be applied to prevent encroachments.

Upgrade Land Survey Infrastructure for EMM.

Identify gaps in the coverage of EMM by Town Survey Mark Network. Investigate the usability of the existing Town Survey Marks. Liaise with Department of Land Affairs: Surveys & Mappings with regard to the survey of Town Survey Marks.

KPA: SPATIAL PLANNING Strategic Objectives To prepare, develop and review Integrated Spatial Development Framework

Key Performance Indicators Review the Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework

7 Local Spatial Development Frameworks

To formulate spatial development policies/strategies

Densification framework

Ensure that preventative measures are applied and adhered to by all relevant departments. Provision of the report covering the status quo of EMM Town Survey Mark coverage. Provision of the report covering the usability of the existing Town Survey Marks. Obtain a Memorandum of agreement with Department of Land Affairs: Surveys and Mapping. Formulation of action plan to upgrade the EMM Town Survey Mark coverage.

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Lobbying/buy in from other departments • Study briefs • Appointment of consultants • Establishment of Project Management Task Teams. • Progress Reports • Lobbying/buy in from other departments • Study brief • Appointment of

April 2008

September 2007

March 2008

March 2008

June 2008

• • • •

Annual Targets + Deadlines Status Quo Final Report Approval of documents& brochures June 2008

• • •

Status Quo Final Report Approval & brochures

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To manage strategic projects/programmes



• •

review the core economic development triangle study

• • •



• •

Formulate an Implement a prioritization model in consultation with the CFO

• • • • •

consultants Establishment of Project Management Task Team. Progress Reports Lobbying/buy in from other departments Study brief Appointment of consultants Establishment of Project Management Task Team. Progress Reports Lobbying/buy in from other departments in consultation with the CFO Study brief Appointment of consultants Establishment of Project Management Task Team. Progress Reports Ensure optimal compliance of projects with the SDFs.



June 2008

• • •

Status Quo Final Report Approval & brochures June 2008



Ongoing

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To liaise with stakeholders at a spatial planning (SP) level

HIV/AIDS

• •

To provide information and support/guidance in terms of SP

• • •

To manage implementation of spatial plans at all levels.



Set up participation structures for Public participation/awareness campaign Discussions and/or meetings with relevant stakeholders (internal and external)

Address queries Comment on applications Inputs to other departmental plans and consultants and/or developers Ensure compliance of applications with spatial plans



Identification of concentration of prevalence in order to provide facilities (orphanages, cemeteries • Awareness campaign of Pilot programme on cremation projects • Continuous involvement and facilitation of developers fora • Input into IDP representative fora and other sector specific fora Endeavour to comment on applications on stipulated time.

Ongoing

80% compliance

Ongoing

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Liaise with all EMM Depts

Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing

GIS Strategy formulation to be finalised

Apr 2007

GIS Structure formulation to be finalised

Jun 2007

Internal policies / procedures

Ongoing revision and

Ongoing

Ongoing

KPA: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM Strategic Objectives To establish a Corporate GIS for EMM

Key Performance Indicators GIS Strategy for Corporate GIS in Ekurhuleni MM. GIS Structure for Corporate GIS.

To provide a framework for GIS

Compilation and implementation of policies /

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operations

To maintain, extend and enhance the Planning and GIS database

procedures / operations and workflows for GIS within the municipality.

Core GIS data set maintenance, development and management (e.g. cadastre, streets, addresses, facilities, wards, zoning, etc).

compiled and implemented for core data management.

development

Development and implementation of required policies / procedures / strategies identified.

Ongoing revision and development

Accurate data with coverage for entire municipal area. Accuracy and integrity of data.

Ongoing

Finalise and implement an agreement for electronic cadastre data sharing with SG Office.

Dec 2007

Ongoing Design, implement and manage systems/interfaces/applications for planning data management (LUM) specifically. Development of an integrated LUMS for LUM with core focus on system development, technical support, map compilation, as well as data capture and dissemination.

Improvement and extension of data capture applications for data set maintenance.

Maintenance and support of existing tracking system. Capture all existing TP Scheme data.

Ongoing

System design and development for initial roll out.

Jun 2008

System enhancement, data capture, map compilation, technical support as well as any further requirements from LUM to finalise LUMS.

March 2008

Enhanced street address capturing application.

March 2008

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Acquire updated and accurate colour ortho-photos (aerial photography) and DTM.

Database extension for functional data sets to address needs of departments. Manage and maintain GIS database software and applications.

Spatially accurate colour orthophoto data set according to required specifications with coverage for the entire municipal area.

Jun 2007

Accurate DTM for entire municipal area.

Nov 2007

Accurate data according to functional needs of departments

Ongoing

Updated software licenses. Upgrade Oracle to Oracle 10g.

Apr 2007

Signing of proper maintenance agreement Dec 2007 Manage and administer the GIS database and system effectively.

Daily management, backup and support of the GIS database and system.

Ongoing

Improvement of the GIS database configuration and integrity.

Ongoing

Training for GIS officials on GIS database management where required.

May 2007

Obtain a new high spec GIS database server. Apr 2007 Extend and upgrade the GIS database and application hardware where required.

Implement mirror and backup servers for GIS database and applications.

May 2007

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Finalise and implement the new unique property identifier. Completed Ensure effective integration/linking between the Develop and implement GIS and other primary systems (e.g. financial system, procedures and workflows. WEMM). Update and maintain data.

Incorporation of Deeds and ownership data into the GIS database.

Source data and execute project to integrate with cadastre data. Establish link with applicable systems.

Ongoing

Ongoing Jun 2007

Jun 2007 To provide relevant GIS data/information

Accessibility to core GIS data to all officials via GIS intranet viewer.

Metro-wide access to GIS viewer via the intranet.

Completed (Ongoing)

Enhancement of the GIS viewer to address functional data dissemination requirements of departments.

Enhancement of the GIS viewer according to requirements and data set availability.

Ongoing

GIS viewer development for data capture and maintenance via web based front-ends according to functional requirements.

Development and successful implementation of required frontends.

March 2008 (Ongoing)

Development and implementation of an Internet GIS Viewer for data dissemination to the public.

Functional and accessible Internet GIS Viewer on Ekurhuleni website.

March 2008

Effective data dissemination via enhanced electronic applications.

March 2008

Implement and manage alternative data dissemination applications.

Timeous and efficient handling of

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Ensure effective handling of data/map requests.

all requests accepted.

Ongoing

Standardise and implement sale of data policy. Dec 2007 Manage and maintain GIS application and dissemination software and applications.

Provide training to GIS officials on software where required. Ongoing Updated software licenses and maintenance agreement as well as functional applications.

To perform specific GIS research/projects

Manage and execute all required GIS projects. This includes the capture of data, systems development, workflow, application development, system integration and other development requirements.

To provide for GIS support & analysis

Provide for support services in terms of GIS. This includes technical support, analysis, specifications and organisational GIS strategy. Provide GIS analysis capability and capacity.

Manage and maintain GIS application and dissemination software and applications used for GIS analysis.

100% Accepted requests and developments completed. Effective GIS developments and system integration. Ensure capacity on structure. Effective support in terms of requests.

Ongoing Ongoing

Ongoing

Execute 100% of accepted analysis requests.

Ongoing

Provide statistical reports and maps on request or per publishing cycle.

Ongoing

Provide training to GIS officials on software where required.

Ongoing

Ensure capacity on structure. Dec 2007 Updated software licenses and maintenance agreement as well as functional applications.

Ongoing

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7.1.3

FOCUS AREA 3: ROADS AND TRANSPORT

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives Institutional Review: Departmental Phase

Good Governance Infrastructure Services – Support Services To Provide Administrative Support and Services to the Department of Road Transport and Civil Works All Departmental stakeholders within Infrastructure Services. That is all Stakeholders of the Department of Infrastructure Services in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Political • Personnel of the Department of Infrastructure Services • Political Stakeholders • Provision of support and liaison services between the political fraternity and officials • Provision of reporting and information dispensation, both internal and external to the portfolio • Personnel • Provision of liaison for departmental personnel with internal departments and external organisations 645 Vacant Positions unfunded Provide Report and Resolution Tracking Electronic System – Target date – 2008 Implementation of the Financial Control System – Target date – December 2007 Implementation of the Project Monitoring System – Target date- December 2007 Key Performance Indicators

Institutional Review: Divisional Phase

Incorporation of RTCW structures into Infrastructure Services Department Finalise Placement

To implement performance management system for the Department

Implementation at corporate management level

To adhere to the Metro’s Employment

Number of people from the employment

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Complete organogram and filling of the structure Adjust posts categories Implement PMS at corporate level Implement PMS at regional level Implement PMS at operational level Implement Metro's Equity Plan and

Annual Targets + Deadlines June-07 Dec 07 or according to project plan June-08 June 08 June-08 50% Completion: June 2007

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Equity Plan

equity target groups employed in the first three levels of management. 80% achievement in accordance with the employment equity plan within 5 years

To eliminate corruption

To adhere to the Metro’s Mentorship Programme for the Department

Investigation of all cases/allegations reported 100% success rate in dismissal of employees found guilty 100% Implementation of the Mentorship Programme

To adhere to the Metro’s succession programme

100% implementation of the succession programme

Implement the Metro’s succession programme

To develop a CPD Programme

100% Implementation of the CPD Programme

Implement the CPD Programme

Training and Development

Implementation of the approved training and Number of People trained and developed development programmes for 18.1 – Internal Employees and 18.2 - External Procedures finalised & implemented Draft Procedures Fully integrated & functional ICT system Fully integrated and workable GIS

To develop & implement an effective ICT system for the Department To establish an effective administration section

Programme

60% Completion: June 2008 70% Completion: June 2009 80% Completion: June 2010

100 % implementation at all levels Institute disciplinary enquiries

June 07 Ad hoc (As and when required) Ad hoc (As and when required) 40% within Year 1 of approval 60% within Year 2 of approval 80% within Year 3 of approval 100% within Year 3 of approval 40% within Year 1 of approval 60% within Year 2 of approval 80% within Year 3 of approval 100% within Year 3 of approval 40% within Year 1 of approval 60% within Year 2 of approval 80% within Year 3 of approval 100% within Year 3 of approval 100% implementation of the programme within 2 yrs of approval June-07 June-08

Dismissal process Implement the Metro’s Mentorship Programme

Resolution tracking/software system to be 100% complete implementation implemented 95% of correspondence to be handled within 100% complete implementation 14 days Fully functional technical library 100% complete implementation

June-08 Continuous June-07

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Marketing of the Department

100% implementation of Metro’s Web site Development of articles on the Department for internal & external newsletters

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Submission of Department’s articles to the Continuous Metro’s internal & external newsletters Populating the Metro’s Web site with Continuous Department’s information Response to media enquiries within 48 Continuous hours

AGEING AND POORLY-MAINTAINED TRADING SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE AND INADEQUATE ACCESS TO BASIC SERVICES Infrastructure Services – Roads and Stormwater Services To Provide an Equitable and Sustainable Road and Stormwater Infrastructure to all our customers All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Informal settlements • Residential • Business +/or commercial • Industrial • Informal settlements (basic level) • Provision of Access Roads and Link Roads for Public Transport • Provision of Stormwater Infrastructure to prevent Flooding and Loss of Life • Residential (high level) • Tarring of gravel roads (Eliminating backlog of 1800 Km of Gravel Tertiary roads in 10 years) • Reducing the backlog of Stormwater Infrastructure that results in flood-prone areas • Business and/or commercial • Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance • Stormwater Upgrades and Maintenance • Industrial • Road Rehabilitation and Maintenance to reduce poor conditioned roads by 20% • Stormwater Upgrades and Maintenance to prevent Flooding • Tertiary Roads (Gravel Roads) 1800 Km • Stormwater Infrastructure 1000 Km The Roads Building Programme indicates the following targets: • Provision of equitable Roads Infrastructure Services to all – target date – 2015

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Strategic Objectives Provision of equitable Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure

• Provision of equitable Stormwater Infrastructure Services to all – target date – 2012 The elimination of gravel roads within the boundaries of Ekurhuleni. It is envisaged that the current Informal Settlements will be provided with appropriate roads infrastructure in close conjunction with the provision of Housing through the Housing Programme of Council. Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Deadlines Actions 2007/08 – 150 Km Reduction of backlog as at December 2000 Elimination of 1800 Km of gravel tertiary (Subject to the allocation of roads additional funds) Number of flood-prone areas reduced per annum Provision of access roads for new housing Reduction of risk of flooding

All proclaimed stands The elimination of a minimum of two flooding-prone areas per annum Elimination of 1000 Km of gravel roads in the identified 20 Priority Township programme of Gauteng

30 000 Stands Per Year Annually in September

Efficient and Effective Management of Roads Infrastructure

Approved maintenance plan with indicators on interruptions

Re-gravelling/forming of roads

The number roads to be regraveled/formed Develop of framework and policy on catchment’s management Development of Macro model (natural watercourses with risk assessments)

Annual Replacement of ageing infrastructure in accordance with plan and resource allocation of 2.5% of asset capitalisation 120 km roads regraveled/formed per annum 70 % Completion: June 2007 Completion: June 2008 80 % Completion: June 2007 Completion: June 2008

Eliminate all road backlogs in the identified 20 Priority Township programme of Gauteng

Effective Maintenance Management Plan

Provision of an effective catchments management service to the Metro.

Eliminate 2 flood prone areas per annum

The Development and approval of Stormwater Master Plan

All roads to be completed in the identified 20 Priority Township programme of Gauteng by June 2009 (Subject to the allocation of additional funds)

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The effective and efficient management and maintenance of dams

100 % compliance with DWAF requirements

The efficient and effective management and maintenance of road infrastructure and assets

7 days to investigate a complaint

14 days reaction to letters and correspondence 20 % elimination of poor conditioned roads Monitor maintenance budget (day to day)

Expenditure of allocated maintenance budget

The efficient and effective management and maintenance of Stormwater infrastructure and assets

7 days reaction to complaint 14 days reaction to letters and correspondence Reduction of flooding due to blocked systems - Reduction of flood damage

Development of SMS on Metro level Refinement of SMS to local (regional) level Appoint specialist consultant on an annual basis Perform regular inspections as per Act Complaint tracking system

Update PMS on a two year cycle Develop maintenance implementation plan Implement project monitoring system Implement PMS Implement patching and resealing program Implement PMS and sidewalks management systems Implement patching and resealing programme Develop and implement management plan for street furniture and road markings Expenditure of external maintenance budget Develop complaints system

Pro-active cleaning and repairs of stormwater system before rainy season (annual)

Completion: June 2008 Completion: June 2009 Thereafter annual appointment during July Annually before June Implementation of complaints system by December 07 – continuous Respond to/solve 90% of complaints within 14 days Update: December 07 Annually during July Continuous Update: December 07 Continuous Update: June 07 Continuous Initial Plan: June 08. Thereafter continuous 90% expenditure Continuous

Annually before September

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Develop stormwater management system

Initial Interim Plan: June 08 Revision: November 08 Revision: November 09

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

POOR TRANSPORTATION LINKAGES AND MOBILITY Infrastructure Services – Roads and Stormwater Services To Provide Sustainable Road Infrastructure to all our customers All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Informal settlements • Residential • Business +/or commercial • Industrial • Informal settlements (basic level) • Provision of Access Roads and Link Roads for Public Transport • Residential (high level) • Provision and Upgrading of Traffic Signals and Road Signage • Business and/or commercial • Provision of strategic Road network that allows for sustainable economic growth • Industrial • Provision of strategic Road network that allows for sustainable economic growth The Roads Building Programme indicates the following targets: • Provision of Strategic Road Network Infrastructure – Additional HOV Lanes on R21 & R24 - target date – 2010; Building of PWV 13 &14 - target date - 2020; Building of PWV 15 - target date - 2025

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Strategic Objectives Provision of Strategic Road Network

Key Performance Indicators Completion of Strategic Road Network

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Completion of Strategic Road Network

Annual Targets + Deadlines 2010 – Additional HOV Lanes on R21 & R24 2020 - Building of PWV 13 &14

Upgrading of existing Intersections and Interchanges Effective and Efficient management and maintenance of Road Signs, Road Furniture and Road Markings Reduction in time delays for recovery of incidents on road Provision of effective and uniform road planning services to the Metro.

To provide an effective Traffic Engineering Service for the EMM

Development and Approval of Master Plan/s

Approved Traffic Engineering policies, procedures and management systems

Develop a strategy to identify the Intersections and Interchange Upgrades Number of Road Signs, Markings and Furniture maintained /replaced per annum Approval of Road signs as and when required tender Development of ITS Strategy and Implement Plan Yearly Implementation Plan Road Master Plan Development of the guidelines for Traffic Calming into a policy

2025 - Building of PWV 15 Upgrading of 2 intersections/Interchanges per annum Subject to funding. Replace 15% of signs per annum December 2008

100% Completion: Jun 2007 Annual during September 50% Completion: June 2006 100% Completion: June 2007 October 07 October 07

Development of a Route Numbering system aligned to provincial and national Development of a directional signage manual for the EMM Develop a structure for the Traffic Signal design and implementation function in conjunction with MI

October 07 October 07

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Develop uniform approach to Traffic Signal Management in the EMM Development of a Business Plan for Pedestrian Safety inclusive of Pedestrian Management Plan Adoption of Guidelines with respect to pedestrians and cyclists for the EMM (National Guidelines review) Development of a Bicycle Strategy Development of Guidelines on Traffic Impact Studies Develop a Road Traffic Sign and Signal Management System per region on a uniform system, inclusive of a status quo with regard to GD signs Incident Management and Road Safety

Approved Priority Lists and implementation plans

Development of Local Area Traffic Management Plans Develop an annual ‘As and When Required’ tender for Traffic Signal Maintenance and Traffic Signal Provision Develop an annual ‘As and When Required’ tender for Traffic Signage Maintenance and Traffic Signage Provision Annual Implementation Plan (for inclusion in IDP) Renew traffic signal systems in line with the traffic signal control system Fill the structure and train personnel Establish a Traffic Signal Control Office (Inclusive of accommodation, hardware, software, communication channels, etc)

December 07 October 07

October 07

October 07 October 07 October 07

80 % Completion: June 2007 100 % Completion: June 2008 60 % Completion: June 2007 100 % Completion: June 2008 Annual before January

Annual before January

Annual in November June 09 June 07 June 07

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Develop a strategy for a Traffic Control Centre for EMM Review the structure

Percentage of Traffic Signals synchronised Reduction on reaction times on traffic signal faults Reduce average time for recovery of incidents on road network

Processing time to Traffic Complaints

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department

June 08 December 09

Fill the structure and train the employees Establish a Traffic Control Centre Office

June 09

Implement CCTV on crucial road links on the Network Synchronisation of Traffic Signals in EMM Develop an integrated management system Implement the system

June 10

Establish current level of delays

June 07

Train officials on Incident Management

June 08

Install Variable Message Signage

June 10

Develop a Control System

June 11

The answering and disposal of all queries and complaints with regard to general traffic engineering matters The answering and disposal of all requests received with regard to traffic signal requests The answering and disposal of all requests received with regard to traffic calming requests

June 09

June 10 June 07 June 08

Continuous

Continuous

Continuous

Urban Renewal Infrastructure Services – Building Development

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Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

DEVELOPMENT OF EMM BUILDINGS, AND BUILDING INFRASTRUCURE REQUIREMENTS Internal EMM Departments. General public users. Centralised co-ordination of the Building Development Management function. To establish effective interaction between the EMM Owner departments and the EMM Building Development sections. To develop and enhance a system for the efficient planning, budgeting and implementation of Building Development needs and activities. Not Applicable Develop and enhance integration of the Building Development Management, that will encapsulate: • Building Site Inspections and Supervisions. To be carried out by the Building Development, as requested by owner departments for the purposes of quality control. • Building Cost estimations. To improve detailing, categorising and documenting the work assessments and cost estimations. • Specialist Building contracts. To establish, verify and update external service contracts for all specialist components in EMM Buildings. • Budgeting. To undertake and complete work and cost estimations timeously for the purposes of budget establishment and procurement, and to align with the Budget Office planning process. • Planning. To develop systems and ensure that work requirements are planned, by consolidating, grouping, prioritising and scheduling, that must result in efficient functioning of the Building Development section. • Project management and Implementation. To ensure Project Management of Building development work and the implementation of a strategy that includes consolidation, grouping, prioritisation and scheduling for overall optimisation. • Monitoring. To establish and enhance monitoring of key processes, for feedback and improvement, in a continuous process. • Reporting. To establish and ensure that appropriate reports are produced.

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Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

To provide new municipal buildings and facilities

Provision of completed building with completion documents.

To provide additions / alterations to municipal buildings

Completion of alterations to buildings

Ensure energy efficiency in all municipal buildings.

To conform to industry standards

To ensure access to municipal buildings for people with disabilities

Provision of Headquarter Facilities and Council Chambers Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area

Compliance with statutory requirements

Completion of Facilities as per financial Resource available

Measurable Performance targets / Actions 90% compliance to the building programme / CAPEX Appraisal of proposed buildings in consultation with owner departments Planning Design Compile building programme Supervision and contract administration

Annual Targets + Deadlines Annually by end June

90% compliance to the building programme in a cost-effective and architecturally acceptable standard. Appraisal of proposed buildings in consultation with owner departments Planning Design Compile building programme Supervision and contract administration Approved energy efficiency policy. Establish and maintain the policy Implementation Monitor and Control All existing buildings to comply Investigate and compile action plan Implement Monitor All new buildings to comply Incorporate current legislation in design Provided Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Headquarter Facilities

On request to be completed by end June

June 2007 Continuous February 2007 March 2007 Continuous When designed June 2007

AGEING AND POORLY-MAINTAINED TRADING SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE AND INADEQUATE ACCESS TO BASIC SERVICES

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Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Infrastructure Services – Building Maintenance MAINTAIN EMM BUILDINGS, PREVENT DETERIORATION AND ENSURE THE CURTAILMENT OF HEALTH & SAFETY HAZARDS. Internal EMM Departments and General public users. Centralised co-ordination of the Building Maintenance section’s management function. To establish effective interaction between the EMM owner departments and the EMM Building Maintenance section. To develop and enhance a system for the efficient planning, budgeting and implementation of Building maintenance needs and activities. • To be quantified and recorded. Develop and enhance integration for the complete Building Maintenance Management Function, that will encapsulate: • Building inspections and assessments. To be carried out by the Building Maintenance sections, not only as requested by owner departments for the purposes of reactive maintenance, but pro-actively as well for the purposes of preventive maintenance processes. • Work and Cost estimations. To improve this process by adequately detailing, categorising and documenting the work assessments and cost estimations. • Specialist service contracts. To establish, verify and update external service contracts for all specialist components in EMM Buildings. • Budgeting. To undertake and complete work and cost estimations timeously for the purposes of budget establishment and procurement, and to align with the Budget Office planning process. • Planning. To develop systems and ensure that work requirements are planned, by consolidating, grouping, prioritising and scheduling, to result in efficient functioning of the Building Maintenance section. • Implementation. To ensure development of a work implementation strategy and plan that includes consolidation, grouping, prioritisation and scheduling for overall optimisation. • Monitoring. To establish and enhance monitoring of key processes, for feedback and improvement, in a continuous process. • Reporting. To establish and ensure that appropriate reports are produced.

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Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

Central co-ordination of the management of the Building Maintenance section’s function in EMM.

Procure and implement a Building Maintenance Management system (BMMS)

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Study, investigation to determine specifications and tender documents for the BMMS. • Consultants Study & investigation. • RTCW & Council Approval. • Complete BMMS Specifications & Tender Documents. Procurement of the BMMS through the Open Tender process. • Report for Portfolio. • Portfolio Approval. • Open Tender Advertisements. • Tender Adjudication Report. • RTCW & Council Approval. • Appointment of service provider. • BMMS development process.

Annual Targets + Deadlines May 07.



2007-2008.

Implementation of the BMMS. Commissioning and operation of the BMMS. To ensure that EMM-owned buildings are maintained at an appropriate level for staff and public usage, in terms of applicable legislation, Health and Safety requirements, adequate accessibility for all users, and pleasant environment.



Works Estimates.



Provide work and cost estimates to owner departments from site assessments. Document and record the work and cost estimates in appropriate detail and categorisation.



Systematically document works orders received, progress and

• Continuous. Provide periodic summary totals.

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completion. •

Works Orders Received.



Reactive Maintenance.





Dilapidated uneconomical EMM buildings to be demolished.



Immediate actions to stabilise health and safety risks. Provide estimates and schedule non-emergency repairs.



Inspect and assess buildings. Systematically document and record results of inspections. Verify, update/ establish service contracts for all specialist building components/ systems.



Building assessments. Establish multi-year requirements. Align assessments with Budget Planning Process. Reconcile planned vs actuals.

Continuous. Provide periodic summary totals.

• Continuous. Provide periodic summary totals.

Preventive Maintenance. • Continuous. Provide periodic summary totals.

OPEX / CAPEX Budgets.

Number of dilapidated EMM buildings demolished.

Identify dilapidated EMM buildings. Establish demolition costs.



Continuous.



Annually.

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Budget allocations. Demolition approvals. Demolition implementation. Report. Efficient utilisation of energy in EMM Buildings.

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures

Reduction of electrical consumption.

Replacements to be with energy-saving fittings as and when appropriate. Identification and implementation of appropriate intervention measures.



Continuous

POOR TRANSPORTATION LINKAGES AND MOBILITY Infrastructure Services – Public Transport Planning To provide high quality, accessible, integrated and well-maintained transportation infrastructure, integrated public transport systems, ensuring a high degree of mobility and choices to commuters. All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Informal settlements • Residential • Business +/or commercial • Industrial • Informal settlements (basic level) • Provision of Public Transport facilities and services • Residential (high level) • Provision of Public Transport facilities and services • Business and/or commercial • Provision of strategic integrated Public Transport system, facilities and services. • Industrial • Provision of strategic integrated Public Transport system, facilities and services. • Upgrade all existing Public Transport facilities (+/- 84) to the highest level of service (LOS 3) at a rate of 5 upgrades per annum. All these facilities must cater for the physically disadvantaged. • +/- 9 modal integrated Public Transport Facilities. • Formalise existing informal Public Transport facilities (+/-46) to the basic level of service (LOS 1) at a rate of 5

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Planned improvements in Service

• • • • •

Strategic Objectives

new facilities per annum. Promote more effective taxi and bus services. Provision of attractive, aesthetically pleasing, comfortable and fully equipped Public Transport facilities that blend well with the urban regeneration strategies of the EMM. Provision of integrated ticketing machines in all modal integrated Public Transport Facilities. Reduce walking distance from destination origin to the nearest Public Transport Facilities. Promote more effective taxi and bus services.

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

To organise, facilitate and coordinate Public Transport Communication and Liaison

Regional and Local Communication and Liaison structure

Fully implemented Communication and Liaison structures, reviewed every 5 years • Establish and revive communication and liaison structures • Arrange individual meetings with relevant stakeholders • Record proceedings • Follow up on actions • Continuously monitor the implementation of communication and liaison structures • Periodically review and evaluate the communication and liaison structures

To co-ordinate and ensure the provision of Public Transport operations and services

Minibus Taxi-Type Services By-laws

Approved Minibus Taxi-Type Services By-laws, reviewed every 5 years • • • •

Annual Targets + Deadlines June 08 Review every 2 years

December 08 Review every 5 years

Develop Minibus Taxi-Type Services By-laws Participate in the By-laws Enforcement Task Team Support Public Safety with the promulgation of the Bylaws Evaluate and Review By-laws

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Image of Public Transport

Increase Public Transport market share • Advertisement and promotion/awareness campaigns • Conduct surveys and market research to determine needs and performance • Hold annual Public Transport Summit

Regulated Public Transport Industry

Comment on Operating License applications within 14 days after being received • Receive application from Operating Licences Boards • Evaluate application against EMM Operating Licences Strategy (OLS) • Submit to Local Transport Liaison Committees (LTLCs) for comment (if applicable) • Issue letter of recommendation • Support Gautrans with the Establishment of Transport Operating Licensing Administrative Bodies (TOLABs)

Levels of Service (LOS) for Public Transport services

Improve Levels of Service (LOS) for Public Transport services, reviewed annually • Formulate/Stipulate Levels of Service (LOS) for Public Transport services in terms of Frequency, timetables, fare levels, etc. • Compile Service Level Agreements (SLAs) • Negotiate LOS with relevant Public Transport Operators • Evaluate and review LOS

Surveys/market research annually by September Public Transport Summit annually in October Continuously

Annually by 30 June

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Gauteng Provincial Department of Public Transport , Roads and Works (Gautrans) Initiatives

Integrated Public Transport System

Bus and Taxi Stand License system

A fully Regulated, Registered, Legalised, Formalised and Empowered Public Transport Industry • Attend meetings and liaise with Gautrans • Support Gautrans in Facilitating, Co-ordinating and Organising meetings • Facilitate Training of the Minibus-Taxi and Metered Taxi Industries • Facilitate the Establishment of Minibus-Taxi Cooperatives • Facilitate the implementation of a Minibus-Taxi Route Colour-coding Pilot project and consequently, the rollout thereof • Monitor progress • Co-ordinate and Consolidate Actions • Compile and Submit items, informing Council of progress • Keep database of all initiatives A fully Implemented Integrated Public Transport System within 5 years • Concretise actions of Modal Integration Plan • Liaise and Negotiate with Public Transport Service Providers • Implement Modal Integration Pilot project • Roll out fully fledged Modal Integration Plan Develop uniform Bus and Taxi Stand License system by 30 June 2009 and review every 5 years • Draft Stand License Policy document • Liaise and Negotiate with Bus and Taxi Service Providers for acceptance • Obtain “buy-in” from EMPD/Law Enforcement • Submission to Council for approval • Implement uniform Bus and Taxi Stand License system

Ad hoc

June 2010

Implementation of System by June 09 Revise every 5 years thereafter

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To provide Taxi Support Services

Sustainable Minibus Taxi Industry

A Fully implemented Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) on Taxi Conflict Resolution, reviewed every 5 years • Obtain “buy-in” from Gautrans • Establish Taxi Conflict Register • Log conflicts in Conflict Register • Compile and Submit Quarterly Taxi Conflict report to RTCW Portfolio Committee • Monitor conflict situations A fully operational Regional Taxi office • Hold regular monthly meeting • Monitor progress and take corrective actions

100% by June 08 Review every 3 years

A fully democratically elected Taxi Industry, newly elected every 2 years • Logistical arrangements w.r.t. holding of elections • Oversee election proceedings to ensure free and fair processes are followed • Monitor and Control smooth hand-over of leadership of the Taxi Industry

Every 2 years Next elections: January 2009

A Shared Vision between EMM and Minibus-Taxi Industry, reviewed as soon as possible after the election of ERTC office bearers • Organise and facilitate Taxi Industry Workshop ("Bosberaad") • Facilitate Joint Strategic Planning session • Draft resolutions of Workshop • Oversee implementation of Workshop resolutions

Every second year, within 6 months after completion of biannual elections Next Workshop: March 2009

Continuously

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To plan for Public Transport Infrastructure

Accessible Public Transport Infrastructure

Provide Public Transport Facilities in line with Approved Capital Budget: • Determination of needs for the planning of Public Transport Facilities, including transfer facilities • Development and maintenance of the Regional Public Transport Facilities Framework (RPTFF) • Determination of needs for the upgrading and maintenance of existing Public Transport Facilities • Determination of needs for new Public Transport Facilities • Determination of needs for the upgrading and existing Public Transport Facilities in order to comply with the Taxi Recapitalisation Vehicle Specifications • Compile 5-year Multi-Capital Budget (CAPEX) for the provision of Public Transport Infrastructure • Prioritisation of Public Transport Infrastructure and facilities • Monitoring of the Implementation of Public Transport Infrastructure and Facilities Effective Local Public Transport Planning Projects • Determine needs for Local Public Transport Planning projects • Prioritisation of Local Public Transport Projects • Project Management of Individual Planning Projects • Monitor the implementation of Local Public Transport Planning Projects

Needs Determination Annually by May Prioritisation Annually by June Review CAPEX Annually by 30 November Continuous Monitoring

Needs Determination Annually by May Prioritisation Annually by June Continuous Monitoring

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To plan for Public Transport Services

To provide safe, effective, efficient and affordable Municipal Bus Services

Integrated Public Transport Services

Reliable Municipal Bus Services

An approved Public Transport Plan (PTP), reviewed annually • Formulate Public Transport Vision, Mission, Policy, Goals, Objectives, Norms and Standards (Strategic ITP) • Review of the Current Public Transport Record (CPTR) • Review of the Operating Licenses Strategy (OLS) • Review of the Rationalisation Plan (Rat Plan) • Modal Integration studies by means of Physical-, Network-, Information- and Fare Integration • Determination and assessment of needs of learners and persons with disabilities • Consolidate PTP • Project Management of Individual Planning Projects

Strategic ITP Annually by 30 June CPTR Annually by 30 September OLS Annually by 30 November Rat Plan Annually by 28 February Modal Integration Studies annually by 30 June Needs assessment of learners and persons with disabilities Annually by 30 June PTP Annually by 30 June

Daily Operational, Financial / Administrative and Technical supervision and control • Set Standard of Performance • Evaluate and Amend Standards as-and-when required • Day-to-day planning and supervision of operations • Financial and administrative control • Technical Control and Supervision • Monitor levels and quality of services rendered

Continuously

Restructured Municipal Bus Services over 5 year period • Implement Recommendations of Municipal Bus Investigation • Further Investigate Amalgamation and/or Corporatisation of Germiston and Boksburg Municipal Bus Services • Further Investigate the possible extension/ curtailment of services

100% by June 08

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Replacement of Total Municipal Bus Fleet within 4 years • Conduct Bus Fleet audit to determine condition of buses • Submit item to Council and obtain approval to replace buses • Motivate replacement of bus fleet in order to access required funding Service Level Agreements

Municipal Bus Replacement Policy

Equitable Municipal Bus Tariffs/Fares

Approved Service Level Agreements with Municipal Bus Operators after Corporatisation • Evaluate current service levels • Identify future needs • Develop Service Level Agreements for Municipal Bus Operators • Submit and obtain Council approval • Implementation Approved Municipal Bus replacement policy • Liaise and obtain input from all relevant role players • Develop Municipal Bus Replacement Policy • Submission to Council for approval • Implementation

100% by June 09

July 09

Review Annually

Approved Equitable Municipal Bus Tariffs • •

• Review and Evaluate Existing Tariff Structure Submit to Council for Approval Implement

Obtain Council approval annually by 30 May. Implement fare increase by 1 July

279

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service Strategic Objectives Provide affordable, efficient and reliable fleet availability to all customers in the EMM. (Service Delivery and other Support Service Departments.)

Good Governance Infrastructure Services – Fleet Management To Provide Fleet Management Support and Services to all Internal Departments of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality All Internal Departments of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. Ensure affordable, efficient and reliable fleet availability to all customers in the EMM. Not Applicable

Key Performance Indicators Fleet availability of 87 % in 6 years

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Restructuring of Fleet Management and Mechanical Engineering Division 1. Approval of structure (Revised) 2. Placement of personnel 3. Establishment of Fleet Store (3 Regions) 4. Obtaining the required office equipment 5. Upgrading workshop reception offices

Standardisation and optimisation of affirmative Procurement Policy for spare parts and repairs 1. Revision of Spare Parts and Repairs Policy 2. Establish spare parts stock holding list per Region 3. Fleet Spare Parts Stores Policy 4. Advertise and establish a Fleet Management and Mechanical

Annual Targets + Deadlines July 2007

June 2007 June 2007 April 2007 March 2007 March 2007 March 2007

March 2007 March 2007 March 2007 February 2007

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Engineering database for the provision of spare parts and repairs on rotational basis. 5. Contracts and Tenders a) Fuel b) Tyres New c) Tyres Recaps d) Lubrication e) Gas as alternative fuel Optimisation of Workshop Efficiency/Productivity 1. Maintenance Scheduling - Issuing 2. Booking in of vehicles 3. Collection of vehicles 4. Workshop vehicle flow operation boards 5. Job orders 6. Vehicle recovery procedure 7. Productivity compared to flat rate manual 8. Freeway Workshop Management system Policies and Procedure Manual 1. Preparation of complete document 2. Preparation of item – comments of Departments 3. Submission for approval 4. Implementation of Policies and Procedures 5. Accident Management Policy addition to manual 6. Management Information Policy addition to manual

3 Yearly 2 Yearly 2 Yearly 3 Years 3 years

June 2007 Completed February 2007 Completed Completed November 2007 May 2007

July 2007 April 2007 May 2007 June 2007 July 2007 October 2007 June 2007

Implementation Management Policy

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and Reporting Structure 1. Freeway Workshop Management System complete roll out throughout the Metro 2. On Board Computer – Tender 3. Fuel monitoring 4. Tracking systems – security 5. Vehicle engine monitoring - > 5 ton OBC related 6. Budget monitoring – reporting 7. Driver behaviour monitoring OBC related 8. Vehicle availability 9. Vehicle utilisation 10. Communication Forum Meetings continue

Vehicle, Plant and Equipment surveys to continue 1. Physical vehicle audit, reduce vehicle, plant and equipment by10% 2. Departmental Fleet Replacement Plans a) Public Safety EMPD b) Solid Waste c) Bus – Transport d) SRAC e) RT&CW f) MI – Water g) MI – Electricity h) Finance 2. Implementation of Vehicle Replacement Structure

May 2007

May 2007 May 2007 Ongoing March 2007 June 2007 June 2007 March 2007 June 2007 January 2007 January 2007 March 2007

Completed Completed Completed Completion March 2007 March 2007

282

3. Vehicle and equipment replacement Tender 4. Purchase of four additional buses 5. Tender adjudication

Monitoring Utilisation of Vehicle Fleet

85 % monitoring utilisation in 4 years

“In Sourcing” (Ring Fencing) Alternative Solution to conventional fleet practices.

90 % fleet utilisation in 4 years

MAIN PILLAR OF THE FLEET RATIONALISATION. PROGRAM

January 2007 Completed February 2007

Monitoring of Fleet Utilisation Ongoing 1. With aid of OBC establish actual utilisation 2. Reduce total fleet by ±25% ± 3600 July 2007 3. Arrange more effective utilisation Jan 2007 In sourcing (Ring Fencing) July 2007 1. Fleet Rationalisation plan End January 2007 2. Prepare proposal for pilot project End January 2007 3. Item to obtain principle approval 4. Presentation to portfolio. January 2007 February 2007 5. Presentation to BAT committee 6. Presentation for approval at Mayoral February 2007 Committee and Council 7. Proposal to Union Representatives & March 2007 LLF (Change management) April 2007 8. Business plan for IN SOURCING 9. Establish Business Unit Management Structure May 2007 10. Placement of Personnel 11. Training of drivers and operators May 2007 12. Pilot Project Solid Waste June 2007 June 2007 Start July 2007

Budget

Opex – Division Capex – Division

Drawing up & Monitoring 1. Workshop Operating Budgets

Jan 2007

283

Opex – Vehicle Maintenance Capex – Vehicle Maintenance

2. Workshop Capex Budgets 3. Compiling Vehicle Yearly Budget 4. Compiling Vehicle Capital Budget

100% statutory plant and equipment records in 2 Years

Restructuring of the Mechanical Section of the FM&ME Division 1. Approval of the mechanical structure 2. Placement of personnel 3. Establishment of workshops in Regions, Germiston and Springs 4. Establish workshop in Kempton Park 5. Obtaining necessary office equipment 6. Establishment of workshop request system for technical support services

Jan 2007 Feb 2007 Feb 2007

Ensure support Services to: 1. Fleet Management 2. Civil Works : Building Maintenance

June 2007 July 2007 February 2007 September 2007 April 2007 February 2007

Optimisation of Workshop Efficiency 1. Open riles with logbooks for all necessary plant and equipment according to OHSACT

April 2007

2. 3. 4. 5.

April 2007

Draw up Inspection Schedules Fit works request operation boards Booking in of vehicles for inspection Work request record system on Freeway Workshop Management programme 6. Revising lift and air- conditioning schedules and contracts 7. Coordinate departmental driver

Continue with existing files in Springs and Germiston. Start Jan 2007 with all other CCCs – ongoing

February 2007 Ongoing July 2007

284

training 8. Monitoring PDP Licences in Department

March 2007 Ongoing Ongoing

Information Management Policy and Reporting Structure 1. Safety Communication Forum OHSACT FM & ME 2. Inspection Scheduling 3. Inspection Planning Boards, cherry picker, crane and lift trucks 4. Progress reports - monthly 5. Setting of budgets, mechanical

Replacement and repairs of chiller plant & auxiliary equipment and lifts

Reduced downtime - 98 % availability

Survey on all chiller units and lifts 1. Record all lifts at all CCCs. 2. Record all chiller plants at all CCCs 3. Inspection of all lifts – establish records 4. Inspection of all chiller plant - records 5. Draw up standard chiller specifications 6. Draw up standard lift inspections 7. Draw up standard list of air conditioning units spares 8. Budget for chillers and lifts

April 2007 February 2007 January 2007 Ongoing January/Ongoing As per finance dept schedule June 2007 February 2007 February 2007 End February 2007 End February 2007 End April 2007 End March 2007 End of April 2007 As per finance time

285

Maintenance of all chiller plant and lifts 1. Revise all chiller plant and lift contracts 2. Draw up new maintenance cpecifications 3. Routine inspections on work quality 4. Ensure that contractors carry out statutory inspections 5. Capture chillers and lifts, scheduling and history on Freeway Asset Management System Training and Development FM&ME

Implementation of Staff skills and Equity Programme

Establishment of effective training programmes and skills audits 3. Completion of skills audits 4. Plan training for all assistant trade workers 5. Apprentice and learnerships 6. Refresher courses - all relevant personnel 7. PC Training Courses - all relevant personnel 8. Career planning - selected personnel with potential

schedule April 2007 April 2007 June 2007 Ongoing Ongoing July 2007

Completed March 2007 Ongoing Ongoing April 2007

286

7.1.4 7.1.4.1

SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA 4: WATER SERVICES

EMM GDS Focus Area In the Physical Landscape Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

Definition of Customer

1. Ageing and poorly maintained trading services infrastructure and inadequate access to basic services 2. Environment 3. The need for Urban Renewal Infrastructure Services Department – Water Services Division To render affordable, equitable and sustainable water services (water and waste water) in terms of the Water Services Act (Act 108 of 1997) to all our customers All water service users within the Ekurhuleni area of jurisdiction (including cross-border consumers/users). They are categorised as: • Informal settlements • Residential (all categories) • Business and/or commercial • Industrial • Farmers / residents beyond the Urban Edge •

Service Level planned • •

Service Level planned …

• •

Informal settlements (basic level) • Water: Communal standpipes (RDP standard) – block/bulk metering. • Sewer: Dry Sanitation systems and/or similar where no sewer reticulation is available within a reasonable distance. • Sewer: Water-borne public toilet facilities where a sewer reticulation is nearby. Residential (high level) • Water: Metered Erf connection. • Sewer: Water-borne sewer system. Business and/or commercial (high level) • Water: Metered Erf connection. • Sewer: Water-borne sewer system. Industrial (high level) • Water: Metered Erf connection. • Sewer: Water-borne sewer system. Farming / Residents outside Urban Edge (basic level) • Water: Rudimentary piping with communal storage tanks for potable use.

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Sewer: VIP latrines / dry sanitation system – dolomitic areas to be considered on merit.

The term ‘backlog’ must be defined and qualified in order to provide a comprehensive understanding of what is intended on this issue. The ‘backlog’ in water services (water and waste water) consists of the following major components:

Backlog Estimate Figures

• • • • • • • • • • •

Planned improvements in Water Services

Highlighted Political Issues / Interventions

Households below basic level potable water - 26 000 households R 2 994 000 Households below basic level sanitation (toilet facility) - 135 000 households R 66 000 000 Households with potable water but no Erf connections – 135 000 households Households with sewer bucket facility - 126 households R 500 000 Ageing infrastructure where no operational funds are allocated R 45 000 000/yr Ageing infrastructure where limited operational funds allocated R 53 000 000/yr Water meter replacement programme in terms of Water Services Act R 23 000 000/yr Indigent leak repair programme (backlog) R 9 000 000 Unfunded vacancies (i.e. ratio of employee pipe length served) R to be quantified Uncontrolled influx of people causing additional strain on existing services and not catered for R cannot quantify Leap-frog type development pursued in uncontrolled manner R cannot quantify

The Strategic Framework for Water Services (SFWS) indicates the following targets: • Provision of potable water services to all – target date – March 2008 • Provision of appropriate sanitation – target date – March 2010 • Removal of all sewer bucket systems – target date – March 2006 (DWAF’s date = Dec 2007) The eradication of sewer bucket systems within proclaimed areas has now been concluded (October 2005) within the boundaries of Ekurhuleni (excluding unproclaimed ‘Wagplek’ and surrounding areas in Nigel). Proclaimed areas with internal sewer reticulation but no Erf connections (126 households) – to be provided with individual connections. It is envisaged that the current Informal Settlements (unproclaimed / private land) will be provided with appropriate sanitation facilities (toilets) in close conjunction with the provision of Housing through the Housing Programme of Council. Although all of the above and the rest of this document comprises and/or addresses in a more detailed fashion some of the issue raised by the political leadership, it is important to ensure that the Water Services Division maintains the route and focus on these directives. The following political issues were highlighted during the National Water Summit , which needs to be incorporated throughout the activities of the Water Services Division. (For further reading, refer to the National Water Summit Overview document – May 2006). • Need to ensure that all communities have access to basic services.

288

• • • • • •

Need to provide adequate support to build capacity of local government structures as delivery agents. Need to engage civil society in developmental programmes. Need to recognise the current realities of water shortages, linked with climate changes. The recognition of the importance of local, provincial and national initiatives. Realisation of the pivotal role of intergovernmental structures to coordinate planning and delivery. Need to ensure that programmes promote local economic development, employment creation and skills development.

The above issues / factors are seen to be critical in order to link achievements with the other spheres of government. SALGA political directives: • Promote an awareness of maintaining and collecting strategic data and statistics (DWAF initiative: Water Information Network (WIN)). • Participation in all water-related SALGA structures. Other General Issues: Interventions – eg. Assisting smaller municipalities (i.e. Eastern Cape) Strategic Objectives

Integrate different spheres of Government

Key Performance Indicators

Strengthening links between sectoral planning with area planning

Alignment of water services and Housing developments

Strengthening collaboration with Province and DWAF

Alignment with Provincial / National Strategies National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 24 clause 6.2.1

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Align GDS 2025 and Spatial Plans with master planning

National / Provincial Targets March 2008

Annual Targets + Deadlines Annual review and alignment

Annual review and mid-year budget review

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 33 clause 9.3.2.3

Align Water Services Capital Budget with Housing essential services plan

March 2008

National Water Summit Overview (outcomes – May 2006) page 25

Establish quarterly meetings with relevant departments

March 2008 Quarterly per annum

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Submission of the WSDP

1. Adoption and approval by Council

Optimise operations on water and sewer infrastructure

1. Populate and update WADISO and SEWSAN master plan modules

clause 6.2.7 Strategic Framework for Water Services – Sept 2003 (Section 5)

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) Page 24 clause 6.2.2

2. Maintain the updated master plan modules

3. Prioritisation of master plan projects

1. Review of WSDP 2. Submission to Council 3. Submission to DWAF / Province

Annual Review

1. Monitor and liaise with Consultant

On-going

1. Develop long term update of master plan/procedure 2. Implement Maintenance plan for updated modules 3. Develop operational procedures

On-going

On-going

01 October 2007

1. Implement master plan priorities

On-going

01 June 2008

Annual Review

01 July 2008 28 October 2007 30 January 2008 30 December 2008 June 2007

Optimisation of Fleet Management

1. Outsource the fleet function

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) Page 25 clause 6.2.6

1. Approval for pilot project 2. Implement pilot project 3. Roll-out to all regions

Assessing the need for basic water services

Verifying backlog data so that planning can meet sector targets

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) Page 25 clause 6.2.4 1. Gauteng Water Sector Plan – October 2006 2. National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 23

1. Consolidate status quo studies

Availability of adequate water resources to support developmental initiatives

1. Promote effective water resource management

2.

1. 2.

3.

(Water Services & Housing) Determine backlog figures and progress Develop an awareness strategy Determine status of available resource in conjunction with WSP (Rand Water & DWAF) Quarterly reports to communities

30 June 2008 30 January 2008 30 March 2008 30 June 2007

28 August 2007

On-going

Annual progress report June 2008 December 2008

August 2008 December 2007 February 2008

Quarter reporting Quarter reporting

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2. Develop drought water management strategies linked to climate changes

clause 6.1.1

1. National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 23 clause 6.1.2 1. National Water 3. Managing potable water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May quality in order to adhere to regulations and maintain 2006) page 24 clause 6.1.5 & page good water quality standards 32 clause 9.3.2.1

Achieve financial sustainability of Water Services

Provide adequate / appropriate sanitation infrastructure in terms of

1. Compare current water demand patterns 2. Compare with availability of resources in conjunction with WSP (Rand Water) 3. Develop restriction plans and scenarios

June 2008 February 2008 June 2008

1. Determine status quo throughout all regions 2. Compare with current minimum requirements 3. Reporting on progress

June 2008 Quarter reporting (DWAF)

October 2007 January 2008 June 2008

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 32 clause9.3.2.1

1. Develop sustainable and realistic tariff structure 2. Establish reliable costing data 3. Setting of realistic & affordable tariffs

2. Increase credit control measures

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 32 clause9.3.2.1

1. Determine current income rate 2. Establish desired income level for sustainability

June 2008 June 2008

3. Establish an asset base for water services

Gauteng Water Sector Plan – October 2006

1. Appoint consultant through bidding 2. Develop asset management plan 3. Obtain Council approval on AMP 4. Implement asset management plan 1. Compile strategy 2. Submit to Council for approval 3. Implement the strategy

Dec 2007 June 2008 February 2009 March 2009

1. Setting of realistic water service tariffs

1. Full roll out of strategy to all settlements

1. Strategic Framework for Water Services (DWAF)

June 2008 June 2008

June 2007

March 2010

291

model/strategy to all

Management of staff to perform optimally

1. Measure and improve the performance of staff

2. Gauteng Water Sector Plan – October 2006 National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006 Page 25 clause 6.2.5

1. Determine required staff component 2.Develop implementation programme

2. Develop sufficient capacity to deliver water services to meet targets in SFfWS

2. Effective customer communication

December 2008

December 2007 January 2009 March 2009 December 2007 May 2008

Gauteng Water Sector Plan – October 2006

Promote effective and efficient water services delivery: 1. Effective and efficient service delivery to customers

1. Compile strategy 2. Submit to Council for approval 3. Implementation of strategy

Benchmarking of services in general

Effective and efficient call centre

3. Optimising the billing chain

Combining the meter reading and billing system

4. Effective by-laws

Update of by-laws

1. Develop benchmarks for performance measure in general 1. Setting of benchmarks for response times 2. Compare with other institutions

July 2007

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 33 clause 9.3.2.3

1. Implement benchmark 2. Monitor performance

December 2007 On-going

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 32 clause 9.3.2.1

1. Implement the WEMM in full 2. Conclude Section 78 process

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 32 clause 9.3.2.1

1. 2. 3. 4.

Draft the updated by-laws Call for comments Promulgate by-laws Enforce promulgated by-laws

1.Compile a customer care charter

July 2007 Quarterly

July 2007 December 2008 ? depends on CM & ED Dec 2007 March 2008 June 2008

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5. Customer Care Charter

Acceptance of charter by customers

Reduction of unaccounted for Reduce by 10 % the total non water revenue water

Increase life expectancy of existing infrastructure

1. Refurbish and replace ageing infrastructure (CAPEX)

2. Reduce unplanned service interruptions (OPEX)

Multi year Capital Budget

Implement Capital Budget

1. Compile SDBIP

1. Job creation – BEE promotion on all projects.

2. Communicate to all relevant stakeholders 3. Charter approval by Council 4. Implement charter

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 27 Major and critical issues for immediate attention

1. Develop community-based leak fix strategy 2. Implement indigent leak fix project 3. Isolate zones and install zone meters 4. Water balance on isolated zones 1. Develop an asset management strategy 2. Identify and prioritise projects 3. Implementation of approved projects

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006) page 27 Major and critical issues for immediate attention & page 32 clause 9.3.2.1 National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – 1. Develop a strategy/plan May 2006) page 27 2. Identify and prioritise projects Major and critical 3. Implementation of approved projects issues for immediate attention MFMA (Act 56 of 2003) 1. Compile SDBIP 2008/2009 2. Obtain permission to public participation through IDP 3. Obtain final Portfolio Committee support 4. Public participation 1. Utilisation of SMMEs and ABEs

Oct 2008 July 2087 August 2007 December 2007 January 2008 28 July 2007 01 August 2007 30 June 2008 30 December 2008 June 2007

January 2008 March 2008 July 2008

November 2007 March 2008 July 2008

December 2007 February 2008 February 2008 February / March 2008

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Average 30 % of construction cost

and include estimates in all PDRs and Ward Committee involvement

July 2008

2. 80 % Expenditure of approved funds

1. Approval of competent Consultant appointments within 2 months of project approval

July 2008

3. Performance Management of Consultants & budget implementation

1. Quarterly SDBIP performance report 2. Quarterly capital budget progress report 3. Consultant performance report

Promote effective and efficient institutions in the water sector in Gauteng: Service delivery mechanism (Institutional Reform)

Quarterly Quarterly Quarterly

Gauteng Water Sector Plan (October 2006) 1. Undertake section 78 process

Municipal Structures Act (Act 117 of 1998)

1. Appoint lead consultant 2. Commence the process 3. Liaise with organised labour and public 4. Recommend preferred mechanism 5. Obtain Council approval

Gauteng Water Sector Plan – October 2006

1. Isolate income and expenditure 2. Detach from support service departments 3. Investigate alternative funding and resources

2. Ring fence the business

3. Service delivery mechanism 4. Expedited resolution of water management and water services institutions

June 2007

National Water Summit Overview (Outcomes – May 2006 Page 24 clause 6.2.3

1. Commence business as a new mechanism

July 2008 depends on CM & ED? August 2007 same comment October 2007 same comment February 2008 March 2008 October 2007 December 2007 On-going

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July 2008 7.1.4.2 ELECTRICITY AND ENERGY Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures

Planned improvements in Service

ADDRESS AGEING AND POORLY MAINTAINED EXISTING ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND TO CATER FOR FUTURE CUSTOMERS Electricity and Energy To provide reliable, affordable and sustainable electricity services to the community of Ekurhuleni. All electricity users within the Ekurhuleni boundaries. They are categorised as: • Low Cost Housing • Residential • Business +/or commercial • Industrial • Low Cost Housing Developments (full level) • Electricity: 40 Amp • Community Lighting: Preference by Ward Councilors is High Mast Lights but needs to be confirmed prior to finalisation of design. Conventional streetlights in main roads. • Residential (full level) • Electricity: 60 – 80 Amp • Community Lighting: Conventional Street Lighting (Cost of Developer) • Business and/or commercial • Electricity: 150 Amp 3 phase • Community Lights: Conventional Street Lighting (Cost of Developer) • Industrial • Electricity: Bulk Medium or High Voltage Supply (Subject to demand) • Community Lights: Conventional Street Lighting (Cost of Developer) • Electricity: ± 100 000 Households • Street Lighting: ± 2 500 Lights • High Mast Lights: ± 500 High Masts The Strategic Objectives for Electricity include the following: • Provision of electricity service connections to all.

295

• • • •

Provision of community lights to all. Refurbishment of electrical networks in certain areas. Re-instate electrical network in Kwa-Thema. Minimise Revenue Losses.

Strategic Objectives Key Performance Indicators 1. To successfully transform the present 1. Structure nine individual structures into one truly integrated metropolitan organisational structure and to prepare for possible future developments 2. Placement of personnel

3. Filling of vacancies

4. Equity

5. Revisiting structure

Measurable Performance targets / Actions 1. Council approval. • Workshop with Portfolio Councillors. • Recommendations by Portfolio Committee. • Approval by Mayoral Committee. 2. All personnel placed. • Approval of Placement Policy by Mayoral Committee. • Referred to Labour Relations Committee. • Approval by Council. • Placement of staff. • Enforcement of placements • Pre-arbitration process • Final arbitration process 3. All funded vacancies filled as and when required • Advertise posts for funded prioritised critical posts. • Short listing, interviews and appointments. 4. In line with Government Policy by June 2007 • Compile status quo report • Prepare strategy 5. Approval of changes by 31 July 2007 • Report to Portfolio Committee on desired changes. • Council Approval

Annual Targets + Deadlines Complete

Complete Complete Complete 31 December 2007 As and when required As and when required Complete Complete 31 July 2007 30 September 2007

296

6. Ring-fencing of electricity distribution activities

2. To optimally develop and empower all 1. Training process staff members and organisational structures to ensure maximal organisational effectiveness and efficiency 2. Training courses

3. Training centre

4. Organisational Culture

5. Organisational Systems

1. Appointment of lead consultant to drive the process • Appoint lead consultant • Appoint sub consultants • Provide information to consultants • Implement proposals 1. Clear procedures and docs for all training. • Do survey of present procedures and docs. • Finalise procedures and docs with HR Dept. • Inform all relevant staff members. 1. All major training available on annual contract. • Reach consensus on mandatory training to be included in annual tender • Prepare tender mandatory document and call for tenders 1. Investigation into training centre complete. • Compile task team to do investigations and report • Reach consensus and report to Council 2. Transformation of training centre complete. • Budget for implementation of recommendations • Implement Council resolution 1. Organisational culture that is sensitive to wasteful practices • Compile energy efficiency policy • Organisation-wide implementation of policy 2. Organisational culture that is sensitive to all aspects of equity • Monitor and revise on a continual basis 1. Organisational systems to drive all key aspects of operations • Identify all processes in need of formal systems • Develop systems to suit identified needs • Comply with ISO 9000

Complete Complete Complete Complete Complete 31 December 2007 31 December 2007 30 September 2007 31 July 2007 31 July 2007

Complete Complete 30 November 2007 31 December 2007

Complete Continuous process

Continuous process

Complete 31 December 2007 31 December 2008

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6. Learnerships

1. Appointment of 20 learners • Appointment process 3. To reduce vandalism and theft of 1. Protective structures 1. Approval in principle. electrical equipment and of electricity 2. Provision of funds to deal with • Draft report to Portfolio Committee. to levels that will no longer threaten all problematic areas in five • Mayoral Committee Approval. the viability of the organisation years, i.e. 20% per annum • Implementation of policy 2. Budget approval by 1 July annually • Identify and include in draft annual Capital Budgets • Capital Budget Process. • If approved, call for tenders. • Acceptance of tender process. • Equipment manufactured • Complete installation. 3. Appointment of area inspectors. 3. Approval in principle. Pilot project • Draft report to Portfolio Committee. • Approval by Mayoral Committee. • Operating Budget Process. • If approved, appoint a consultant to manage the process. • Consultant calls for proposals • Appointment of inspectors process. • Inspectors commence duty. • Consultant provides monthly reports on effectiveness of programme. • Report to portfolio committee on way forward. 4. Customer education

1. Forums in all regions. • Integrate with existing Developers forum and IDP process • Monitor success and revamp strategy. • Participate in public participation meetings in all regions

31 December 2007 Complete Complete Ongoing – as funds became available

Complete Complete

31 December 2007 In line with regional IDP meetings As arranged by IDP Office

298

4. To refurbish, adapt and maintain the various electrical networks and electrical equipment of the Metro to facilitate acceptable service delivery

5. Removal of illegal connections 5. As and when required • Provide funds on operating budget. • Incorporate into meter reading process • Monitor cost and success of programme from regional feedback. • Reinforce the process 6. Full scale customer audit 1. Approval in principle 2. Determine scope and strategy of audit work to be undertaken 3. Regular progress reports • Provide funds on operating budget • Appoint consultant to draw up tender document • Call for tenders and appoint contractors • Correct data where applicable 1. Consensus on list of proposed projects 1. Prioritised list of proposed projects for refurbishment • Activate Regional /Area electrical engineers to compile lists of networks / equipment that is in need of refurbishment 2. Updated list by November every year • Workshop lists with Regional / Area engineers to prioritise 3. Budget proposals by November every year 2. Provide funds and 2% tariff levy • Repeat annually to update list and to develop budget proposals 1. Approved funds by 1 July every year • Motivate funding for Capital Budget annually 3. Inform Ward Councillors and • Approval of funds by Council. customers of refurbishment 1. Meeting with Ward Councillors projects • Ward councillors informed by 30 June every year • Customers informed by 30 June every year • Advise media centre

Complete Monthly process Continuous process As required

Complete Complete Complete 31 December 2007 Complete

Continuous process Deadlines determined by Finance Dept Continuous process Continuous process 31 May annually Prior to commencement

299

5(a) To improve and maintain customer service to acceptable levels

5(b) To improve and maintain operator safety to acceptable levels

1. Appropriate maintenance 1. procedures and schedules aligned with manufacturers’ recommendations, legislation and economic principles and realities

2. Provide funds

3. Inform customers

Procedures and schedules developed. • Build database of equipment to be maintained • Workshop with Regional Electricity Directors and Area Managers to reach consensus on procedures and schedules to be followed. • Reach consensus with regional Electricity Managers on type and level of maintenance required. • Draw up programmes. • Train regional personnel in application of programmes. • Implement programmes. • Monitor programmes and take corrective action where necessary. 2. Approved funds on annual budget • Motivate funding for Operational Budget. • Approval of funds by Council. 3. Notices to customers In terms of programmes • Determine strategy for informing customers in conjunction with Marketing Department. • Hold workshop with Regional personnel and draw up Departmental Policy Document for informing customers. • Maintain database of contact personnel at key customers.

December 2007 December 2007 December 2007 December 2007 December 2007 December 2007 December 2007

March annually

December 2007 December 2007

December 2007

300

4. Proper operational procedures 1. Consolidated operational procedures and standing instructions. • Workshop with Regional Electricity Managers to reach consensus on uniform standing instructions and operational procedures.

• Draw up uniform standing instructions • Train regional personnel in application of standing instructions and procedures

The procedures are set up according to request or requirements of the personnel, CCC or laws laid down. Should there be any misunderstanding then this will be work-shopped if required. Complete This is carried out by the individual Operations Officers of the sections, should they have queries they are able to contact William Hunt or Glenn Becker by e-mail to verify any problems or misunderstandings Hot Work, Silica Gel and Respirators Instruction awaiting approval from General Manager: Electricity and Energy Mr M. Wilson Ongoing

• Implement new uniform standing instructions and procedures

5. Power quality management system

• Monitor use of standing instructions and procedures and take corrective action where necessary. 1. Power quality management system to NER requirements. • Workshop NER requirements with CCC staff • Design and document PQMS • Implement PQMS • Customer contracts

Complete Complete Ongoing As per NER Doc Dec 2007

301

6. To address the backlog in the provision 1. Identify areas of electrical reticulation and coordinate the installation of electrical service connections 2. Applications for funds

1. Identify areas by September annually • Request information from Regional Electricity Directors and Chief Area Engineers. 2. Lodge motivated applications annually by November • Complete and submit MIG application forms. 3. Electrify 3. Spend budget before 31/3 annually • Enter into agreement with MIG when funds are granted. • Inform Council of grants received. • Include projects in Capital Budgets. • Call for tenders where necessary. • Acceptance of tenders process. • Install networks and service connections. 4. Maintenance programmes/asset 4. Maintenance programmes/asset register by end July register annually • Final inspection of completed networks after maintenance period is complete and before release of sureties. • Include in asset register and maintenance programme and operating budget. 5. New customer service 1. New policy to facilitate the making of service connections made connections • Approval of new policy by Council • Inform staff and councillors • Inform customers

September annually

November annually 28 February annually 31 January annually 28 February annually 30 June annually 31 December annually 31 March annually

31 July annually Procedures in progress

Complete Complete Complete

302

7. Provide and maintain street and 1. Identify areas & agree with Public area lighting to address identified Safety/IDP directorate security and social needs 2. Apply for funding – MIG

3. Install lighting

4. Maintenance programmes / asset register

1. Areas identified and agreed to by September annually • Obtain information from IDP process and workshop September annually with Public Safety Department. 2. Motivated applications by November annually November annually • Complete and submit business plans. December annually • Provide counter funding on annual capital budget. 3. Spend Budget before 30 June annually Annually as required • Enter into agreement with Province if required. As required • Inform Council of grants received. December annually • Include projects in draft annual Capital Budget. May – June annually • Departmental planning. • Call for tenders where necessary. • Acceptance of tenders process. • Install street and high mast lighting. 4. Approved maintenance programmes / asset register for following year May annually • Final inspection of completed networks after maintenance period is complete and before release Procedures in progress of sureties. • Include in asset register and maintenance programme and operating budget

303

7.1.5

FOCUS AREA 5: ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

• A substantial increase in the general quality of the environment • To render an affordable, equitable and sustainable solid waste services to all our customers • Inequitable, poorly-maintained parks Environmental Development Department •

To ensure a safe and sustainable environment, by promoting awareness. The services offered to be provided by a vibrant, dynamic and people-centred team • Ekurhuleni to have world-class parks All residents within the Ekurhuleni boundaries and beyond. They are categorised as: Informal settlements Residential Business +/or commercial Industrial Other EMM internal departments • Disadvantaged residential settlements (high level) In order to ensure a safe and sustainable environment: Provide environmental education and raise awareness Develop strategies and plans to improve the quality of the living environment Monitor and enforce environmental legislation including by-laws • Other Residential (basic level) In order to ensure a safe and sustainable environment: Provide environmental education and raise awareness Develop strategies and plans to improve the quality of the living environment Monitor and enforce environmental legislation including by-laws • Business and/or commercial (high level) In order to ensure a safe and sustainable environment: Provide environmental education and raise awareness Develop strategies and plans to improve the quality of the living environment Monitor and enforce environmental legislation including by-laws • Industrial (high level) In order to ensure a safe and sustainable environment: Provide environmental education and raise awareness Develop strategies and plans to improve the quality of the living environment

304

• • • • • •

Backlog Figures

Monitor and enforce environmental legislation including by-laws Community of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality: Metro Parks Develop and improve service delivery standards towards comparable international standards Informal settlements Bulk container service Residential Erf size - A once a week house to house refuse removal service Business and /or commercial Container size – Refuse removal services depending on the frequency of removal Industrial Container size – Refuse removal services depending on the frequency of removal Disposal services General public – type of refuse and the tonnage disposed

88% - Environmental education and awareness 10% - Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Stations 100% - Cleaner production technologies 80% - Promotion of energy- efficient processes and alternative energy sources 80% - Biodiversity conservation 70% - Commenting on Developmental Applications 100% - Degradation of land due to mining - Hloekisa – signing of MOU between EMM, DME and Mining houses 80% - Metro Parks Solid Waste: The term ‘backlog’ must be defined in order to provide a comprehensive understanding of what is intended on this issue. The ‘backlog’ consists of the following components: Ageing operational equipment where no operational funds are allocated Refuse removal services, 120 000 households

Environment Key Performance Indicators Strategic Objectives To ensure environmental sustainability within in EMM

Implement Environmental Policy

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Implementation at all EMM Departments

Annual Targets + Deadlines 2007 - 2011

305

Integrate sustainability and LA 21 principles into the EMM IDP and GDS

Implement Urban Environmental Management Programme

To ensure integration of Environmental Planning in all EMM Plans

Develop environmental policies, strategies and plans

Developing sustainability indicators

2007 – 2011

Sustainability Reporting

Annually

State of Environment reporting Coordinate and monitor the implementation of urban environmental management programme. Ensure availability of technical advice/ assistance for the UEM programmes. Research and development Input and comment on EMM departmental plans policies and programmes.

2008 2007-2011

Policy for dealing with high potential/value agriculture areas

July 2008

July 2008

Strategy for management of urban sprawl. Ongoing Develop Open Space and Biodiversity management plan. December 2007

To ensure that negative environmental impacts are prevented, minimised and managed accordingly

Compliance with environmental legislative requirements

Linkage of EMM plans/strategies with the National Urban Grasslands programme.

Ongoing

Development of by-laws

Ongoing

Monitor compliance

Ongoing

Enforce the Council by-laws

Ongoing

Enforce legislation

Ongoing

306

Establish a fully functional GIS facility e.g. incl info on SOER, EMF, AQMP, EIA applications etc

June 2008

Set up a System for control of Development applications e.g. EIA, land alienation, EMPS

June 2008

3.3 Implementation of Environment Management System (EMS) within EMM

3.3.1 To have a EMS up and running in all municipal facilities

2007 - 2011

To ensure Sustainable Energy Practices at EMM

Implementation of “ Energy Efficiency & Climate Change Strategy”

Installation of Energy Efficient Equipment at Council Buildings Energy Management System LPG Gas conversion of Council vehicles LEDs for traffic lights

July 2007 -2010

To ensure Environmental Pollution Control and management

Implementation of AQMP for EMM

Installation of Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Stations throughout the regions

June 2008 – 9 stations

Implement integrated electronic environmental information management system

Ongoing Monitor air quality within the EMM region Production of State of Air Report

Annual

Develop an emission inventory

June 2008

Development of Dispersion model

June 2009

Review of AQMP

June 2010

307

Control and management of water pollution

Develop a Strategic Integrated Water Resources Management Plan for EMM

June 2007

Ensure monitoring quality of Water Courses

Ongoing

Promote the rehabilitation of degraded and sustainable use of Water Courses Rehabilitation of Bullfrog Pan June 2010 Rehabilitation of Boksburg Lake June 2010 Rehabilitation of Jackson Dam June 2010 Rehabilitation of Blaauwpan June 2010 Rehabilitation of Blesbokspruit Rehabilitation of Siluma View 5.3 Control and management of land pollution

To facilitate environmental capacity building at EMM

Develop Accredited Environmental Education and Awareness programmes

5.3.1 Facilitate rehabilitation of polluted mining land

June 2010 June 2010 June 2008 On going

5.3.2 Facilitate rehabilitation of degraded land.

On going

5.3.3 Promote the greening of open spaces e.g. illegal dumping hotspots. SETA Accredited EE Materials and training courses Development of Environmental Induction Manual

On going June 2008 Dec 2007

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Implementation of Education for Sustainable Development 2015

Promotion of Schools Environmental Education Programme

Ongoing

6.3 Promote public participation in the EMM Environmental Forum

Annually

6.6 Celebrate and commemorate days of Environmental importance

6.3.1 Meetings held annually by the Metro Forum 6.3.2 Implement community development projects at ward level. 6.4.1 Established resource centre in the Edenvale CCC 6.4.2 Operational EE Centre at Siluma Regional Park 6.4.3 Operational EE Centres at Leeupan and Esselen Park 6.5.1 Celebrate 4 days of environmental importance

Implement environmental learnerships

Enrol 5 learners per year

Annually

To ensure promotion of environmental information

Provision of updated environmental information via intranet, internet and print media. Develop environmental publications and marketing material e.g. exhibition stands, Publish environmental bulletin

2008 – 2011

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

Approved strategy

1 July 2006 - achieved

Approved strategy

31 December 2007

Approved document

30 June 07 - achieved

Establish and manage environmental resource centre and environment education centres

Metro Parks STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Develop strategies, policies, norms, standards and working procedures for the management of Parks, Cemeteries, Public

Compilation of: Grass cutting strategy including audits of all areas and facilities Turn around strategy for cemeteries Norms and standards document. Heroes Acre policy. Livestock Policy

2008 2008 2010-Complete Annually

2008 – 2011 2008 – 2011

309

Open Spaces and Conservation.

ARBORICULTURE

Urban Forestry/Aboriculture policy and action plan. Conservation Policy Occupational Health and Safety action plan Access at facilities for disabled people action plan. Removal and control of invasive alien vegetation action plan. Improvement of “Esprit De corps action plan”

Number of street trees planted Number of fruit trees planted. Developing of horticultural skills in communities (number of members)

Approved document Approved document Approved document

30 June 2007 30 June 2007 30 June 2008

Approved document

30 June 2009

Approved document

31 December 2007

Approved document

31 December 2007

Approved document

30 June 2007

Approved document

1 July 2007 - 30 June 2011 30 June 2008 – 30 JUNE 2011

One thousand (1000) ornamental and one thousand (1000) fruit trees per region. Developed skills of 10 community members per region

% of jobs/contracts procured to PDIs through LED initiatives (including capital projects) Maintaining horticultural requirements at:

TURF GRASS MANAGEMENT

parks (regional and smaller) open areas side walks traffic islands cemeteries crematoriums street trees conservation areas and wetlands (as applicable)

Acceptable standards according to approved Policies and the Norms and Standards document at all Metro Parks

Ongoing.

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PROMOTE RECREATIONAL, CONSERVATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS

Number of national environmental events conducted. Number of alternative burial programmes run. Number of educational programmes managed. Ensuring conservation of the environment.

One event on three identified environmental days. One alternative burial method community liaison event. One educational programme. One press release on conservation of the environment.

30 June 2007 -30 JUNE 2011

Compiling and implementation of alternative methods for: 31 December 2006 1 July 2007 31 December 2007 30 June 2008 30 June 2009 30 June 2010 30 June 2011

grass cutting cemetery maintenance cemetery administration weed control conservation of the environment urban greening arboriculture

Service option implemented Service option implemented Service option implemented Service option implemented Service option implemented Service option implemented Service option implemented

Promoting of ownership of Metro Parks facilities by involving local communities in rendering of services

One facility per Region protected, managed 30 June 2007 – 30 JUNE and maintained by local community 2011 members

311

Number of existing facilities improved. URBAN GREENING AND LANDSCAPING

Various smaller parks upgraded with playground equipment.

30 June 2008

Next phase of Siluma Regional Park upgrading completed.

30 June 2008

Phase 1 of the Mahlatini Park, Bunny Park, Dries Niemandt and the Bokkie park upgrading completed.

30 June 2008

Next phase of upgrading of lakes and dams completed. 30 June 2008 - Alberton Dam - Boksburg Lake - Germiston Lake

312

Compilation of a Metro Parks masterplan. Number of multi purpose parks developed

Number of town entrances improved. Number of new cemeteries developed.

Next phase of four Multi Purpose Parks completed: Spruitview Siluma Kwa-Thema Marivate (Daveyton) Rocky Park (Duduza)

30 June 2008

Next phase of the Duduza Town Entrance completed.

30 June 2007

New Northern cemetery (Phase 1) developed.

30 June 2007

The Brakpan and Benoni Cemeteries upgraded.

30 June 2007

The Nigel and Benoni depots upgraded/developed.

30 June 2007

The next phase of the Brakpan Civic Centre Garden completed. A notice board at each of 2 facilities per region.

30 June 2007

Number of existing cemeteries upgraded Number of depots upgraded. Number of civic centre gardens upgraded.

Number of information boards erected. Number of Metro Parks brochures and pamphlets distributed

30 June 2008-30 June 2011

One new Metro Parks brochure and 1000 copies distributed.

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Number of facilities fenced Number of facilities with access control. Conducting of Occupational Safety and Health audits Enforcement of by-laws. Installation and maintenance of ighting Improve safety and security at all Metro Parks facilities

Number of disabled-friendly facilities erected. Number of wheel-chair friendly facilities. * Leveling of park areas. * Creating of ramps for wheel chairs. * Paving of pathways * Upgrading of parking areas * Instating of visitors books.

Secure one facility per region Secure one facility per region.

30 June 2007 30 June 2008

Secure one facility per region.

30 June 2009

Secure one facility per region

30 June 2010

Secure one facility per region

30 June 2011

One facility per region upgraded.

30 June 2007

One facility per region upgraded.

30 June 2008

One facility per region upgraded.

30 June 2009

One facility per region upgraded.

30 June 2010

One facility per region upgraded.

30 June 2011

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Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

1. Optimise the management of specialised vehicles

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 1. To maintain vehicle availability of at least 90%

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS 1. To obtain permission to extend the contract period for full maintenance leasing to a period exceeding 3 years. 2. To outsource the provision and management of 20% of the Solid Waste Fleet

2. To influence the procurement of specialised vehicles based on the utilisation and deployment

3. To be actively involved in the compilation of the technical specifications of the specialised vehicles required

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

To comply with the process as prescribed in Section 33 of MFMA

Annual Targets/ Deadlines MAY 2007

To involve RTCW in the process of outsourcing of provision and management of fleet To obtain Council’s approval for outsourcing the provision and management of fleet

To compile the specifications for specialised vehicles in collaboration with RT&CW

315

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS 4.Investigate procure, implement and maintain a suitable management information system

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

4. The development implementation and maintenance of a vehicle replacement policy / strategy

5.To develop criteria that will inform the replacement of specialised vehicles

5. Compile the policy/strategy

1. To identify alternative sources of funding for social and non income generating services

1. To eliminate the subsidisation of social and non income generating services from tariffs income

1.To obtain approval for investigating NOVEMBER 2007 alternative sources of funding for social and non income generating services in consultation with Finance Department by funding social services from alternative sources of funding

3. Implement a sustainable management information system

2.Income and billing optimisation

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

4. To compile specifications for the procurement of a suitable management information system in collaboration with the Finance Department dept and RT&CTW

316

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

3. Improve solid waste services

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

2. Billing of all services rendered

2. Develop, implement and maintain a monthly service point billing conciliation system in collaboration with various support departments.

3. Compare services billed with physical service point counts on a monthly basis

1. To develop a solid waste marketing and customer care strategy

1. To establish a centralised call centre for Waste Services

1. Complaints and customer satisfaction/ survey index.

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

4. Implement the conciliation system in collaboration with GIS, Finance Department Develop Plannin, WEMM and workflow

AUGUST 2007

2. Regularly submit print and electronic media inserts 3. Develop user friendly and informative documentation 4. Develop uniform service levels and standards Develop customer care and marketing strategy in line with other approved marketing strategy

317

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

4. Manage landfill sites according to legislative requirements.

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

2. % customer satisfaction

2. To ensure service provision, uniform standards and levels

6. Conduct a customer satisfaction survey

1. Contracts for operation and maintenance

1. To ensure effective service delivery

1. Ensure that operational contracts are in place at all landfill sites

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

JULY 2007

2. To provide environmentally compliant landfill sites 2. Performance Audit

3. External audit performance target of 80%

2. Ensure appointment of external auditors and activate Section 33 of MFMA to extend to 5 years

3. Monthly inspections, reporting and monitoring

4. Monitoring on compliance with relevant legislation

3. Monthly inspections, monthly, quarterly and annual reporting to relevant departments

4. Cell and stormwater development

5.Ensure sufficient airspace is available according to legislation Weltevreden, Rietfontein, Simmer & Jack and Rooikraal

Ensure adequate budgeting.

5. Purchasing of land

Design, planning and construction. 6. Compliance with legislative requirements

318

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

6. Development of new landfill sites and expansion of existing landfill sites

6. Obtain permit for development of Zesfontein landfill site.

7. Appointment of consultants for rezoning and technical investigations

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

7.Investigate the purchasing of ground at Zesfontein and Rooikraal Waste Sites

7. To manage closed landfill sites

8. To comply with relevant legislation at all operational sites and all closed sites

8. Obtain sufficient funding: for Bullfrog Pan phase 2 Tembisa phase 1 9. Monitoring and maintenance as required by legislation 10. To apply for closure permits for rehabilitation of closed sites 11. Monitoring and maintenance

5. To develop the EMM CDM project to reduce landfill gas emissions and promote renewable energy use

1. The expansion of the gas fields

1. To ensure maximum gas extraction

1. Obtain Funding

2. Installation of wells and flares

2. To obtain carbon credits

2. Consultant appointment (flares and wells)

AUGUST 2007

3. Short listing of buyers for

319

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

6.Optimisation of solid waste services and facilities

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 3. Development of renewable energy 1. Ring fencing of solid waste services

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS purchasing of renewable energy 1.Finalisation of the Section 78 process with regard to:

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

3. Contractors appointed 1. Obtain funding for simulation model for implementation of recommendations from the optimisation study.

JUNE 2007

Financial ring fencing Operational ring fencing – movable and immovable assets, as well as human resources 2. Procurement services

320

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2. Revise the bylaws and align with the service delivery needs and other legislative requirements

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS 2. Review the current bylaws in order to address: the registration of private waste service providers (WIS) cancellation/reduction in service provision approval of all building complexes/security townships to ensure compliance with solid waste services ensure building rubble is safely disposed of at an approved landfill and issue developers with a certificate of safe disposal of building rubble to curtail illegal dumping inclusion for buffer zone around landfill site

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

3. Identify shortcomings in the current bylaws and update. 4. Obtain Council’s approval and promulgate the reviewed bylaws 5. Implement the WIS 6. To be included in the workflow for demolitions and extensions to buildings 7. Workshop the bylaws with the Portfolio Committee

321

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 3. To coordinate education and awareness programmes

4. Staff development and support

5. Develop operational procedures– Solid Waste Specific

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS 3. To identify gaps in existing education and awareness programmes

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

4. Compile Workplace Skills plans, Personnel Wellbeing, Employment Equity Plans, HIV/AIDS/Tuberculosi s plan and Occupational Health and Safety matters

10. Ensure attendance of training

5. Compile Solid Waste operational procedures in accordance with EMM Strategies/policies

12. Liaise with the relevant departments.

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

8. To develop an education and awareness strategy 9. To identify and address the hot spot areas.

11.Ensure compliance with the relevant legislation

13.Workshop the operational guidelines with organised labour 14. Draw up a guideline 14. Obtain approval from Council 15. Implementation

322

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

6. Marketing of solid waste services

6. To develop a solid waste marketing and customer care strategy

16. To establish a centralised call centre for Waste Services

7. To ensure service provision of uniform standards and levels

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

17. Regularly submit print and electronic media inserts 18. Develop user friendly information documentations 19. Develop uniform service level and standards

7. Implementation of refuse removal services in informal settlements

8. To ensure equitable service delivery

8. Develop an integrated waste management plan

9. To move from fragmented to holistic service delivery in managing waste from cradle to grave

20. Develop customer care and marketing strategy 21. Obtain funding and other resources 22. Implement service delivery

23. Promoting and facilitating recycling and waste minimisation initiatives. 24. Ensure controlled cost effective disposal and treatment of waste. 25. Encourage waste prevention by cleaner production strategies.

7. Budget management

1. SDBIP

1. Compile the SDBIP

1. Quarterly SDBIP performance report

Quarterly

323

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

2. CAPEX

2. Obtain final Portfolio recommendation

3. Planning and design

3. Public participation

4. Procurement

3. Timely implementation of the capital projects

5. Construction

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

2.Quarterly capital budget progress report

3. Project planning and implementation program

4. 85% Expenditure at the end of financial year ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

1.

To ensure compliance with Tobacco Legislation in Food Premises and Government institutions

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 1.1. Increase compliance with Tobacco Legislation in formal food premises.

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS Increase number of formal premises compliant with Tobacco Legislation from 4256-6372 (529 increase per annum)

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

4785 June 2008 5314 June 2009 5843 June 2010 6372 June 2011

1.2. To increase the number of Council premises that are compliant with Tobacco Legislation.

2007/08 TARGETS

1st quarter Increase to 3980 2nd quarter increase to 4125 3rd quarter increase to 4210 4th quarter increase to 4256

• Determine number not compliant by June 2007 • Determine number to be increased by June 2007

324

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

2.

To prevent, monitor, reduce and control air, noise, land and water pollution

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

2.3. Number of recreational water samples taken π Number of moore pad samples taken π Number of drinking water samples taken

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS Increase number of monitoring stations compliant with particulate matter standards to five. To test 1600 of diesel driven vehicles. To prosecute non compliant tested diesel driven vehicle by serving notices 100 recreational water samples taken by 2011 100 moore pad samples taken by 2011 100 drinking water samples taken by 2011

Number of inspected residential stands for rodent infestation.

π 33 600 residential stands inspected for rodent infestation

2.1.Particulate matter air samples compliant with standards 2.2. Tested non-compliant diesel driven vehicles to be compliant

3.

To reduce and control rodent infestation

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

3 station June 2008 4 station June 2009 5 station June 2010 7 station June 2011 400 vehicles tested June 08 800 vehicles tested June 09 1200 vehicles tested June 10 1600 vehicles tested June 11 25 samples per category of water sample by June 2008 50 samples per category of water sample by June 2009 75 samples per category of water sample by June 2010 100 samples per category of water sample by June 2011 8400 June 2008

1st quarter All reservoirs compliant 2nd quarter all reservoirs compliant 3rd quarter all reservoirs compliant 4th quarter all reserviours compliant

16 800 June 2009 25 200 June 2010 33 600 June 2011

4.

Compliance with Health requirements in safe provision of food by

Number of business premises inspected for rodent infestation

π

Number of formal food premises issued with Certificates of Acceptability

π 1024 Certificates of Acceptability to be issued by June 2011

40 320 business premises inspected for rodent infestation

10 080 June 2008 20 160 June 2009 30 320 June 2010 40 480 June 2011 256 June 2008 512 June 2009 768 June 2010

325

Solid Waste STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

accrediting Monitor and control of overgrown grass on private stands

(COA’s) Number of privately owned stands where grass is cut.

6.

Ensure compliance with Funeral Undertakers Regulations

7.

Ensure compliance with Pre-School regulations

To increase number of Funeral Undertakers with Certificate of Competence (COC) To increase number of PreSchool Institutions with Health Certificates

8.

To rationalise all health by-laws

5.

A promulgated set of by-laws for environmental health

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS π To cut grass on 6 000 privately owned stands by 2011 Inspection of each Undertaker at least once per month. π 100 Health Certificates to be issued to complying pre-school institutions π 1 set of By-laws promulgated

ANNUAL TARGETS AND DEADLINES

Annual Targets/ Deadlines

1024 June 2011 1500 stand by June 2008 3000 stand by June 2009 4500 stand by June 2010 6000 stand by June 2011 4 by June 2008 5 by June 2009 6 by June 2010 7 by June 2011 25 by June 2008 50 by June 2009 75 by June 2010 100 by June 2011 Public input June 2008 Promulgation June 2009 Implementation June 2010 Implementation June 2011

326

Planned improvements in Service

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

Definition of Customer



Strategic Priorities for Environment; (i.t.o SOER) Human Environment: Environmental education and awareness Land and soil: Improve the unsustainable use of land and soil Water quality: Improve water quality and conservation of water resources Atmosphere: Improve air quality management Biodiversity and conservation: Improvement of biodiversity conservation Environmental Management Improve legislative compliance • The Strategic Framework for Environmental Development Department facilities to the community of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality indicates the following targets: Metro Parks Provide additional Environmental Development facilities to obtain equity and transformation. Upgrade and maintain existing Environmental Development facilities. • More sustainable disposal of solid waste: Comprehensive waste minimisation strategy (including recycling) – 2007 Provision of operational equipment for rendering solid waste services Provision of appropriate solid waste services

ENVIRONMENT Infrastructure Services – Civil Works Directorate – Dolomite Risk Management Section To develop and manage a Dolomite Risk Management System to manage development on dolomitic land, manage infrastructure on dolomitic land, assist communities living on dolomite, minimise risk to life and property in existing areas underlain by dolomite, identify areas for future township development, reduce medium to long term expenditure on crisis service repairs and sinkhole rehabilitation. All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Informal settlements

327

Service Level planned

• Residential • Business +/or commercial (specifically developers of new townships) • Industrial Ekurhuleni’s Dolomite Risk Management System has two fundamental components, namely: 1. A Council Management Structure, and 2. A set of policies and plans which will enable the management structure to effectively make decisions and carry out required tasks. The plan is to effectively manage the Dolomite Risk Management Steering Committee, and its four sub-committees listed hereunder, to ensure they do the work required to reduce the risk for people living in high risk areas. • Dolomite Risk Management Section • Dolomite Infrastructure Management Task Team • Dolomite Awareness Task Team • Dolomite Emergency Reaction Task Team The second component of the DRMS contains the following databases and plans, which need to be compiled and or to be put in place. • A database of relevant geotechnical reports, giving the title, author, client and relevant council area. • A borehole and test pit database in which data from each data point is summarised, including the risk assessment for the point. • A plan showing the areas which have been investigated, in other words the area covered by each report entered into the report database. • A plan showing positions of boreholes, trial holes and test pits, linked to the borehole and test pit database. • A plan on which the gravity contours are transposed if a gravity survey had been carried out. • A plan giving the overall risk assessment of the area. • A plan giving geological information considered to be pertinent to the area. • A plan showing all known sinkholes and doline with a linked database giving details of each subsidence.

Backlog Figures

The overall EMM DRMS is in its initial phase and no provision has been made in the organisational structure for this function. However, the following has been implemented, and the balance of the actions listed above is the backlog that needs to be addressed: • The relevant committees have been established and tasked with their various responsibilities. • Consultants have been appointed to investigate subsidence and make recommendations on remedial measures.

328

• Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives Manage and control a Council Dolomite Management Structure, and implement policies and plans which will enable the Council’s Dolomite Management Structure to effectively make decisions and carry out required tasks to reduce the life threatening risk for people living on dolomite and manage the infrastructure to minimise potential triggering mechanisms which may result in the development of dolomite-related subsidence.

The DRMSC had its first two meetings, one in 2004 and one in 2007.

The DRMSC aims to have more regular meetings and to accelerate the processes to put in place all the databases and plans as well as systems and structures to scrutinise all new and existing township applications underlain by dolomite to minimise the incidence of people living on dolomite as well as to put in place remedial programmes for all council services in areas underlain by dolomite. Key Performance Indicators Control and manage in terms of policy and legislative requirements.

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Dolomite Risk Management Steering Committee (DRMSC) to meet to: • Consult with the Dolomite Risk Management Section concerning the overall management of the system • Regularly consider reports on the activities of the dolomite committees • Generate progress reports to Council • Provide a forum for discussing all aspects of the DRMS • Formulate and control joint operations necessitated by the implementation of the DRMS Dolomite Risk Management Section (DRMS) to; • Manage the DRMS for EMM in terms of the policy • Update the Dolomite Risk Management System • Update the existing risk maps for Katlehong, Thokoza, Vosloorus and parts of the Northern region • Liaise with consultants appointed by council to rehabilitate sinkholes

Annual Targets + Deadlines Twice per annum

weekly Monthly Yearly

Weekly

329

• • • •

7.1.6

Submit detailed reports on all sinkholes to Council Update and maintain the various databases Check ground water levels regularly Liaise with NHBRC and CGS when necessary

Yearly Monthly Quarterly Monthly

FOCUS AREA 6: URBAN RENEWAL

EMM GDS FOCUS AREA SERVICE DELIVERY DEPARTMENT DEFINITION OF SERVICE DEFINITION OF CUSTOMER SERVICE LEVEL PLANNED

BACKLOG FIGURES Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives

1. Drafting of an Urban Renewal Strategy

URBAN RENEWAL CITY DEVELOPMENT TO RENDER A STRATEGIC SUPPORT SERVICE IN RESPECT OF URBAN RENEWAL INITIATIVES TO THE METRO AND ITS DEPARTMENTS The Council, Mayoral Committee, Departments and the communities of EMM • The development and implementation of an urban renewal strategy • The launching of urban renewal projects and programs General urban decay especially in CBDs, Industrial Townships and Seclusion Areas • Improvement in urban environment and state of decay • The creating of an urban environment that supports the establishing of sustainable communities Key Performance Indicators

A final approved Urban Renewal Strategy

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • •

2. Implementation of the Urban Renewal Strategy

Number and extent of programmes and projects addressing urban decay

• •

Stakeholder involvement and buy-in Council approval of inner-city in the nine CBDs industrial areas The improvement in the

Annual Targets + Deadlines Completed



Germiston CBD regeneration plan June 2007

330





3. Ensuring maximum benefit from the UDZ Tax Incentive Scheme

Participation in the UDZ Tax Incentive Scheme

• • • •

4. Establishment of City Improvement Districts

Number and nature of CIDs established in the nine CBDs



urban quality of public spaces in areas of decay in residential areas The extent to which inter-departmental maintenance has improved in public spaces The extent to which departmental projects contribute to the urban renewal program



The launching of appropriate promotional programmes The availability of effective administrative support systems Appropriate support systems to potential participants Annual reports to SARS and National Treasury



Ongoing promotional programmes



CIDs operational in at least three CBDs June 2007 CIDs operational in

Active canvassing of support and buy-in from businesses

• • •





Wattville CBD June 2008 Other CBDs June 2009 Industrial areas still to be identified June 2009 Upgrading of the western entrance Germiston CBD June 2007 Annual analysis on the contributions departments are making towards urban renewal through departmental budgets

331

• •

5. Improved urban renewal outputs by departments through departmental capital budgets

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department

Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

The number and extent of departmental capital projects and programs that contribute to urban renewal

rest of the CBDs June 2009

The availability of programmes to support the operations of CIDs The contributions made by CIDs to inner-city regeneration



Improvement of the urban environment as a result of departmental programs and projects.



Reduction in urban decay due to departmental projects and programs



An annual analysis of the capital budgets of departments

The need for Urban renewal Infrastructure Services – civil works (building maintenance, building control and outdoor advertising)

Monitor and manage privately-owned dilapidated and unsafe buildings. All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Residential • Business +/or commercial • Industrial • Other Ekurhuleni department Reduction in number of dilapidated and unsafe buildings within the Metro • Cannot be exactly quantified (continuous process) • Get other departments, Ward Councilors more involved to increase the impact • Concentrate on urban renewal focal area as one of the seven strategies. • Acquire the services of a strong legal team

332

Strategic Objectives Monitor and manage privately owned vacant, dilapidated, abandoned and unsafe buildings within the Metro

7.1.7

Key Performance Indicators Action taken to encourage property owners to upgrade and / or demolish dilapidated and unsafe buildings within the Metro. Number of buildings being refurbished or demolished

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Reduction of the number of dilapidated, abandoned and unsafe buildings within the Metro i.e. .>50% of the identified and documented buildings

Annual Targets + Deadlines Reduce by 15% the identified and documented buildings annually.

FOCUS AREA 7: ICT INFRASTRUCTURE

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned

Backlog Figures

Planned Improvement s and Services

Good Governance Infrastructure and Enablers ICT To provide professional support services within the department and the municipality as a whole. The services offered to be provided by a vibrant, dynamic and people-centered team All residents within the Ekurhuleni boundaries. They are categorised as: • Internal Stakeholders • High level • Financial Management services • Human Resource Management services • General Administration • System Development Services • Enterprise and Systems Services • Infrastructure Services • 2% unfilled, unfunded positions • Office accommodation • Department Structural Review • HIV/AIDS Plan • Secretarial Services • Facilitate integration and optimisation of all existing Systems and ICT Infrastructure • Enable Business Units to increase their level of service delivery through usage of technology

333

• •

Provide capabilities of document workflow Provide effective, efficient and timeous service support to all the Business units.

KPA – Corporate Governance & Administration FOCUS AREA STRATEGIC KPA INITIATIVE Good Governance

Social Development

To ensure Business Aligned Services

To create a sound HR environment

MEASURABLE TARGETS



Functional ICTSC





ICT Master Plan





ICT Operational plans



Formulate ICTSC Charter Gather MSP information from Business Units Structural review and realignment

Annual Targets 2006/07 Completed

Annual Targets 2007/08

Annual Targets 2008/09

Annual Targets 2009/10

July 2007

June 2008

June 2009

June 2010

September 2007

June 2008

June 2009

June 2010



ICT Communication Plan



Start communication workshops with ICT Directors and Managers

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing



Functional InterGov Forum



Identify key ICT & Business representatives for IGF

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing



Ensure Compliance



Audit Report Process

Annually

Annually

Annually

Annually



Employment Equity plans Implement EE policy through HR

Completed

June 2008

June 2009

June 2010

Ongoing

June 2008

June 009

June 2010

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing



Employment Equity Plan

 

HIV/AIDS Plan 

Run awareness campaigns with senior staff & formulate & implement

334



 

Occupational Health & Safety Plan

Skills Plan Individual & Team

programmes 

 

Run awareness campaigns on OH & Safety; Appoint ICT OH&S reps. Start skills review Run IPP & TPP

Ongoing

Ongoing

Completed

June 2008

Ongoing

June 2008

Ongoing

Ongoing

June 2009

June 2009

Completed

Good Governance

To establish a Risk Management Framework

 

ICT Risk Log ICT Risk Policy



Awareness workshops in ICT

Ongoing

June 2008



Identify risk areas within ICT and related business activity Appoint Risk manager Create Risk management committee Negotiations of all Services to base levels

July 2007

June 2008

June 2009

June 2010

June 2007 Ongoing

June 2007 June 2008

July 2009 June 2009

June 2010 June 12010

  Good Governance

To establish an SLA Management function

Completed



SLAs with all internal customers





SLAs with all external customers



Formulate ICT Service catalogue

Annually

Annually

Annually

Annually



Identify underpinning contracts

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Monthly

Monthly

Monthly

Monthly





SLAs with all ICT vendors

SLA management

335

reports KPA – Enterprise Systems Focus Areas Strategic Objective/ KPA Physical

KPI

Deliver a consolidated and integrated application architecture



Measurable Targets

% elimination and reduction of disintegrated software

  

Physical

Social Development

Provide a sustainable  platform to ensure consolidated view of database and maintaining integrity Enhance user’s ability  to serve communities more efficiently

Standardised and consolidated database platforms.



Rationalised user interface and business logic (back-end)



KPA – Infrastructure Focus Area Strategic Objective/ KPI KPA Good Governance

Good Governance

To effectively map relationships between all business units, locations & assets throughout the enterprise Provide effective, efficient, cost –



Reduction or elimination of corrupt data

Measurable/Targets

Policy governing relationships

  

 

Assessment of requirements and needs for EMM Form stakeholder committee Streamlining business processes Elimination of multiple or more individual customer records

SLA management Cost reduction



Identify stakeholders Document the crux of the relationship Set the efficiency and effectiveness levels Draft Service Catalogue

Annual Targets 2006/7 July 2007

Annual Targets 2007/8 Dec 31

Annual Targets 2008/9 Jul2008

Annual Targets 2009/10 Jan 2009

Completed

Complete

Completed

Completed

October 2007 September 2008

Progressing

Progressing

Progressing

Jul 2008

Dec 2009

Jul 2010

October 2007

Dec 2008

Dec 2009

Dec 2010

Annual Targets 2006/7 June 2007

Annual Targets 2007/08 June 2008

Annual Targets 2008/09

Annual Targets 2009/2010

June 2009

June 2010

Completed

Review/ Update

Review/Update

Review/Update

336

effective, scalable, sustainable, reliable, robust & secured communications infrastructure to business & citizens

 

Physical

Provide collaborative technology services



Integrated architecture for voice, video & data

Provide a data automation environment for managing not only computers but data, applications & infrastructure



Integrated information access.

Provide unified access and identity to all EMM employees & associates

 

Centrally managed access control Single identity

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing



Install monitoring tools and procedures

Ongoing Ongoing



Document current procedures



Identify all existing components of data and voice network. Perform ‘’Integration Readiness’’ assessment Compile integration strategy

Completed Completed

Identify management information requirements

Completed

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update

Completed

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update

Completed

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update

June 2008

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update

June 2007

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update

June 2007

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update







Physical & Social

Ongoing

December 2007 (Phase 1)

 Physical & Economic

Ongoing

Establish Configuration Management

 Open standards across infrastructure Monitor infrastructure’s response rate Comply with set standards & Best Practice



Analyse current technology infrastructure

Design integrated data model  Draft policy on Identity management  Perform detailed

Completed Completed

Review/Update Review/Update Review/ Review/Update Review/Update Update Review/ Update Review/ Review/ Review/ Update Update Update Review/Update Review/Update Review/ Update

337

recognition 

Physical & Social

Enhance, Integrate & reduce Cost of Communication Services.

• Provision and management of specific communications services. • Voice and Data integration

     

KPA – Project Management Focus Area Strategic Objective Physical

1. To establish appropriate project management methodology

KPI

analysis on current access controls Perform detailed analysis on current employee identification systems Integrate Data lines Reduce cost of data lines. Integrate Voice lines Replace PABX with Call managers. Staff telephone cost allocations. Integrate staff from Corp & legal to ICT

Measures/Targets

June 2007

Review/Update Review/Update Review/Update

Completed Completed

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

June 2007 Completed

-

-

-

September Ongoing 2007

Ongoing

Ongoing

-

-

-

April 2007

Annual Target 06/07  Completed End November 2006



Project lifecycle



Research & document findings on Project Management methodologies



Approved PM methodology



Identify stakeholders



Completed End January 2007

 

Project document

Propose methodologies & benefits to



To be implemented

Annual Target 07/08  Review and Optimise

Annual Target 08/09  Review and Optimise

Annual Target 09/10  Review and Optimise

338

templates

stakeholders 



Project Flow diagram

 

KPA – Systems Development Focus Area Strategic Objective Physical

1. To adopt SDLC (system development lifecycle)

KPI

End of July 2007

Get buy-in from stakeholders Implement PMO internally Implement PMO externally

Measures/Targets

Annual Target 06/07 Completed Completed



Development lifecycle



Research & document findings on relevant SDLCs



Development processes



Get approval on SDLC

Completed



Implement SDLC

July 2007



Appoint SDLC process owners

Completed



Implement development processes

July 2007



Identify Industrial Standards on Software Testing

Completed



Adopt standards

Completed



Establish System & Integration Testing

Completed



Testing standards / documents

Annual Target 07/08  Review and Optimise

Annual Target 08/09  Review and Optimise

Annual Target 09/10  Review and Optimise

339

Team 



Physical



2. To align new application development technologies & practices to business needs

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department

Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Establish Testing environment for mission critical systems Establish UAT forum & charter



Formal user acceptance





UAT environment



Design and create UAT environment for mission critical systems



UAT processes



Define and implement UAT processes with UAT Forum

January 2008

July 2007



Review and Optimise



Review and Optimise



Review and Optimise

INADEQUATE ICT Infrastructure Services – Civil Works (building maintenance, building control and out door advertising)

To develop, commission and install an electronic building plan management system (to manage the electronic submission, circulation, approval, storage and retrieval of building plans) All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Internal departments • Residents • Business +/or commercial • Industrial

340

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives 5 Electronic building plan management system

• • •

State organs Internal departments (reduce turnaround time for comments on the plans) Residents, business, commercial, industry, State organs (easy access to view progress of their applications via the network and interact with the EMM)

• • • • • •

The current manual system creates backlog which the system will dramatically change for the better Quick approval of building plans applications processes Improved communication with EMM clients Attract developers Development enhancement Generate revenue through property rates Key Performance Indicators

Reduction in the Duration of evaluation of building plans for approval

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Residential properties: Comments to applicants within 7days. Non-Residential: Comments to applicants within 14 days

Annual Targets + Deadlines The system still to be developed, procured and implemented. It is currently at the ‘request for information’ stage Implementation 07/08 Budget

341

7.2

ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION

7.2.1

FOCUS AREA 8: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department

A diversified local economy able to meet local needs, support sustainable development and adapt to changes in accordance with global demands and shifts Economic Development

Definition of Approach Definition of Target groups Interventions planned

Consultative, facilitating and informed by research and analysis The business sector and labour, community and government Forums with sectors of the economy – Mining, Agriculture, Construction and Finance Competitiveness pilot on industry clusters and NCTC as well as the aerospace network Cooperative industrial hives Partnerships for sustainable development Cooperative agreement with universities and parastals KPAs Promote Identified sectors of the economy Facilitate the growth of cooperatives Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Deadlines Strategic Objectives Actions Reports on IGR and Forums 1. Facilitate the regeneration of Successful relations with organised National Casting Technology Centre Network in place in partnership with the manufacturing sector and business, and alignment of local, national government This work is ongoing other sectors provincial and national government programmes Procurement Network in manufacturing in place in partnership with national government

2. Develop the growth of tourism and the linkages to the sector

Alignment of the national provincial and local tourism strategy linked to local economic development

Two GDS reviews per year organised and reported on Number of local businesses stimulated through Tourism promotion reported annually Key interventions to develop Tourism and align to Economic Development Strategy finalised

Reports to Council. This work is ongoing

342

Local Tourism routes, with integrated narratives in place linked to the heritage projects and 2010 programme 3. Facilitate the agriculture

growth

of Co-ordination of agricultural development with province and national

Increase number of black and women small farmers reported annually 3 Agricultural Hubs set up in line with the provincial strategy

4. Facilitate the development Information age readiness of the and growth of the information economy linked to the national, technology sector provincial and local GDS Agenda 2025 Productive and Resourceful application of ICT 5. Monitor the performance of Credible indicators on growth measuring the various sectors the performance of sectors of the economy 6. Facilitate the regeneration of industrial areas and CBDs and upgrade of residential areas

Internal alignment through an urban management model to effect renewal, economic regeneration, revenue enhancement, consolidated infrastructure development and maintenance planning as an integrated base to secure the active involvement of the private sector and other stakeholders

Municipal-owned agricultural land transferred to Economic Development The sector work is ongoing

ICT Infrastructure leveraged and aligned to Broadband Special Purpose investments and e-services and linked to Vehicle leveraging the ICT 2010 legacy programmes infrastructure for the local economy The work is ongoing The forecasts and reliable measurement of the performance of the economy placed into the IDP

Analysis in yearly report – Ongoing

Model designed and plans for implementation finalised for Germiston inner city and reported on

At least three areas completed – Germiston, Kempton Park, Natalspruit by June 2008

Model designed and plans for implementation finalised for Natalspruit and reported on IDZ repositioning reported on

7. Facilitate the re-skilling of the The alignment of local needs and labour force priorities to the National Skills Development Strategy

One Skills Network per year organised and reported on At least one skills network per year Two GDS Review meetings organised and reported on

Two GDS review meetings

343

8. Promote credit and savings Improve access to finance for local Unions. citizens

Report on the number of members in local registered savings and credit unions annually

9. Encourage the community to Mainstream informal financial activity form co-operatives and improve community-based asset formation in the financial sector

Formalisation of at lease 50 burial societies

Annual Reports (ongoing)

10. Through partnerships convert Harness the national and provincial NPOs and food gardens into government programmes for the benefit cooperatives of local ventures

Number of projects converted reported on annually

Ongoing

Annual Report (ongoing)

344

7.2.2

FOCUS AREA 9: JOB CREATION

EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department Definition of Approach Definition of Target groups Interventions planned

KPAs

Labour Absorption and Job Creation – Unemployment to be reduced by half in 2014 and by half again in 2025 based on 2004 unemployment figures Economic Development To facilitate the implementation of national and provincial policies, strategies and programmes on EPWP and sustainable economic development. The business sector, labour and the community as well as internal departments of the municipality and SEDA and GEP Forums with sectors of the economy and interdepartmental forums on Local Economic Development Partnerships for sustainable development Cooperative agreement with banks Job Placement Pilot Programme at a local labour centres Mainstream economic activity in the formal economy

Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing

Facilitate the acquisition of economic skills

The alignment of local skills development targeted at the second economy to national, provincial and local GDS

Report annually on economic Information provision aimed at empowerment of local citizens

Facilitate access to finance

Expand the base of the local economy and increase the access to finances for SMMEs and community projects

Report annually on the number of businesses and projects supported by banks, govt agencies and private companies

Annual Reports

Improve job creation opportunities through municipal projects

Count of jobs, training and formal enterprises supported through MIG and EPWP, PHP as well as capital investment projects of the municipality

Quarterly reports collated in the SBDIP

Annual Reports

Job Placement Programme

Improvement to local economy through employment

Growth + Development Strategic

Annual report produced on the improvement to the economy Employment Services Scheme run in Local Labour Centres

Annual Reports

Labour absorption and Job Creation

345

Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Infrastructure Services – Roads and Stormwater Services To Provide and Create employment opportunities through construction of Road and Stormwater Infrastructure All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality especially those unemployed citizens that are unable to sustain employment. These persons will be identified and sourced from the following areas: • Informal settlements • Previously Disadvantaged Residential Areas • Informal settlements • Identification of construction projects that will provide labour-based construction • Residential • Identification of construction projects that will provide labour-based construction • The Roads Building Programme indicates the following targets: • Expenditure of a minimum 15 % annually of the total budget on job creation projects • Attain an expenditure of 100 % of budget expenditure on identified EPWP Projects by 2007 The reduction of unemployment rate within the boundaries of Ekurhuleni while simultaneously eliminating the service delivery backlogs within current Informal Settlements and previously disadvantaged residential areas.

Strategic Objectives Create Job Opportunities

Key Performance Indicators Budget to be allocated for Job Creation

Budget expenditure on identified EPWP projects

7.2.3

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Job Creation and Development of SMMEs

Annual Targets + Deadlines 15% budget expenditure on job creation per annum

Implement identified EPWP projects

90% budget expenditure on identified EPWP projects

FOCUS AREA 10 : SKILLS DEVELOPMENT EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department

A skilled community exhibiting capabilities in self reliance, innovation and continued reskilling to meet the needs of a growing economy Economic Development

346

Definition of Approach Definition of Target Groups Interventions planned

KPAs Strategic Objectives Facilitate the acquisition of economic skills

Consultative, facilitating and informed by research and analysis The business sector and labour, community and government, Universities and FET campuses Forums with sectors of the economy – Skills Network Competitiveness pilot on industry clusters and NCTC as well as the aerospace network Skills development priorities set with SETA and Dept of Labour Plastics technology institute through the national tooling initiative Incubators for SMMEs Business Linkages Centres with full service to SMMEs Cooperative industrial hives skilling through Dept of Labour Partnerships for sustainable development (literacy, mentorships and internships) Cooperative agreements with academic institutions (Wits and Tshwane University) Promote Identified Sectors of the economy Mainstream economic activity in the formal economy Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Deadlines Actions Alignment of local skills development to national, provincial Annual business week Ongoing and local GDS Economic Information provision aimed at empowerment of local citizens

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Information and skills programmes

Ongoing

Job and Enterprise Fair decentralised

Ongoing

Improving Skills Levels Infrastructure Services – Roads and Stormwater Services To Provide and Create opportunities for skills transfer through construction of targeted Road and Stormwater Infrastructure Projects All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality especially unemployed citizens, small micro enterprises that require improvement in capacity and skills transfer in order to achieve sustainable growth. These persons will be identified and sourced from the following areas: • Informal settlements • Previously Disadvantaged Residential Areas • Informal settlements

347

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

• Provision of Basic Skills Training • Provision of Construction Development Programme • Previously Disadvantaged Residential Areas • Provision of Basic Skills Training • Provision of Construction Development Programme • Identify Projects in which Contractors from Contractors Development Programme can be appointed for practical training and empowerment • 30% Unemployment rate within Ekurhuleni That focused construction and technical skills development programmes be established to train the communities within areas of high unemployment in order to create entrepreneurial and self sustainable communities

348

Strategic Objectives Contractor Development Programme

7.2.4

Key Performance Indicators % of budget spent on Projects identified for Construction Development Programme Number of successful construction projects dealt with by contractors from Development Programme

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Approval of Construction Development Programme Implementation of Contractor Development Programme in conjunction with EPWP projects

Annual Targets + Deadlines 15% budget expenditure on CDP projects per annum 3 projects successfully completed by Contractors from CDP/EPWP

FOCUS AREA 11: TOURISM PROMOTION

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

TOURISM PROMOTION ECONONIC DEVELOPMENT– KPA: Tourism To market and develop Ekurhuleni as a preferred destination of choice All ratepayers within the Ekurhuleni boundaries and visitors from beyond. They are categorised as: • • • • • •





Residential Business and/or commercial Industrial National and International Residential o Provision of accurate and updated tourism information on all services and products in the Ekurhuleni region o Creation of an enabling environment for tourism development Business and/or commercial o Provision of accurate and updated tourism information on all services and products in the Ekurhuleni region o Creation of an enabling environment for tourism development Industrial o Provision of accurate and updated tourism information on all services and products in the Ekurhuleni region

349





Backlog Figures

Planned improvements in Service

50% - Marketing material 45% - Tourism Education and Awareness 80% - Information Centres 80% - Tourism Signage 80% - Strengthening tourism infrastructure The Strategic Framework forTOURISM indicates the following, • • • • •

Strategic Objectives TOURISM MARKETING 1. To market Ekurhuleni as a preferred destination of choice

o Creation of an enabling environment for tourism development National o Provision of accurate and updated tourism information on all services and products in the Ekurhuleni region o Creation of an enabling environment for tourism development International o Provision of accurate and updated tourism information on all services and products in the Ekurhuleni region o Creation of an enabling environment for tourism development

Provision of efficient and effective Customer Service Development of Ekurhuleni Tourism Information Management System Establishment of sustainable and effective regional tourism institutional structure Establishment of partnerships to facilitate tourism development in the region Create enabling environment for Tourism development and participation in the Tourism plan by all Key Performance Indicators

1.1 Development of the Ekurhuleni Tourism Information Management System

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

Annual Targets + Deadlines

1.1.1 Development of a Regional Tourism Information System Strategy and Plan 1.1.2 Upgrade, further development, and maintenance of the Tourism Facilities Inventory 1.1.3 Development of EMM Tourism website



June 2008



Ongoing maintenance Annual Upgrade



June 2008



June 2009

350

1.2 Establishment of Ekurhuleni Tourism Marketing Organisation

1.3 Implementation of the Approved Tourism Marketing Plan

1.1.4 Development of a Gateway Tourism Information Centre at the OR Tambo International Airport and other Satellite Tourism Information Offices 1.2.1 Effective functioning of Ekurhuleni Tourism Marketing Forum 1.2.2 Implementation of Tourism Marketing Initiatives and Joint Ventures 1.2.3 Facilitate the process towards the establishment of a fully fledged Regional Tourism Organisation



Ongoing



Ongoing



2010



Minimum of 3 tourism marketing brochures compiled annually Annual reprinting Ongoing Distribution

• •

September annually As and when necessary



As and when required



Nationally – May annually Internationally – March and November annually Ongoing – Branding 2009

1.3.1 Compilation, printing and distribution of tourism marketing material

1.3.2 Tourism Month Activities 1.3.3 Ensure maximum representation and reward of the Directorate pertaining to 2010 1.3.4 Active participation and representation of the Ekurhuleni Sports Academy 1.3.5 Active Participation in national and international exhibitions, trade and consumer shows



1.3.6 Tourism Marketing and

351

Branding 2. To implement tourism awareness and educational programmes

2.1 Compilation of tourism awareness and information series

2.2 Implementation of the Tourism Youth Initiative Programme

2.1.1 Launch, develop and distribute a bi-annual Educational series Vulindlela

2006- 1st series - Biannual series to be published June and December annually

2.2.1 Assist the functioning of Tourism Youth Initiative Task Team

• June 2006 – 2010 Ongoing Programme – Deliverables dependent on budget received

2.2.2 Implementation of Youth Advocacy Programme



June 2007

2.2.3 Experiential Training Programme



June 2006 – June 2009

2.2.4 Ekurhuleni Youth Enterprise Development Initiative



June 2006 – June 2009

2.2.5 Implementation of Operation Wisdom-Tourism awareness in secondary schools



June 2006 – June 2009



June 2008



July 2007 – June 2009

2.2.6 Development of a Tourism Training Manual

2.3 Implementation of Tourism Workshop series



2.3.1 EMM – follow-up workshops 2.3.2 Tourism educational

352

programmes for schools 2.3.8 How to establish….Tourism workshops and brochures 2.3.9 Annual Tourism Information Workshop



June 2006 – June 2009



June 2006 – June 2009



September annually

3.1.1 Move towards completion of scoping report



June 2007

3.2.1 Move towards completion of scoping report



June 2008

3.3.1 Completion and approval of Regional Tourism Development Strategy and Plan



Dec 2007

4.1.1 Improvement of ablution and other facilities for the different areas 4.2.1 Finalisation of Construction of Tourism Information Centres 4.2.2 Operations of Tourism Information Centres 4.3.1 Support to Department of Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture for the development of Oliver Tambo Precinct 4.3.2 Development of Route Plan for the establishment of the Oliver Tambo Tourism Route



June 2008



December 2008



December 2006 – Ongoing thereafter Ongoing

TOURISM DEVELOPMENT 3. To facilitate the creation of jobs through tourism development

3.1. Complete a Scoping Report for the establishment of a Tourism Business Park (Craft) 3.2 Complete a Scoping Report for the establishment of the African Shopper Hub 3.3 Finalisation of the Regional Tourism Development Strategy and Plan

4. To facilitate and co-ordinate the development of routes in the region

4.1 Improve infrastructure on Tourism Routes 4.2 Operationalise Tourism Information Centers

4.3 Development of Oliver Tambo Tourism Route





Once Master Plan has been completed and submitted to E&T –

353

5. To Implement the Tourism Signage Framework to create an enabling environment for tourist visits

4.4 Development of Time Routes – Region Wide

4.4.1 Identification of time routes (maximum of 1 day) for the Ekurhuleni Region – 6 annually



Completed by June 2008 Ongoing

4.5 Identification of Infrastructural needs pertaining to Route Development

4.5.1 Finalisation and approval of identification of infrastructural needs pertaining to route development study and implementation of recommendations



Annual review

4.6 Facilitate the establishment of 3 Local Tourism Organisations (Eastern, Northern and Southern regions) and support the Local Tourism Organisations once established

4.6.1 Identification of all tourism • associations, Organisations, forums etc., available in Ekurhuleni 4.6.2 Facilitation of 3 workshops • (Eastern, Northern and Southern region) pertaining to LTOs, the ‘how?’, ‘why?’, roles and responsibilities etc. 4.6.3 Support to LTOs once • established – in terms of intellectual capital, provision of generic marketing, advisory support, project specific support (where applicable)

5.1 Implementation of Tourism Signage Framework and Implementation Plan

5.1.1 Appointment of necessary consultants and completion the project



June 2008

August – December 2007

Dependent on when each respective LTO is established

Dependent of budgetary allocations and partnerships established – 2007 - 2010

354

7.2.5

FOCUS AREA 12: INVESTMENT PROMOTION

EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department

INVESTMENT PROMOTION Economic Development

Definition of Approach Definition of Target Groups Interventions planned

Consultative, facilitating and informed by research and analysis The business sector and labour, community and government

KPAs Strategic Objectives Development of tourism facilities

Forums with the tourism sector Business Linkages Centres with full service to SMMEs Promote Identified Sectors of the economy Mainstream economic activity in the formal economy Key Performance Indicators Ekurhuleni developed in sport, culture and heritage destinations by 2015

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Linkages to four heritage projects

Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing

Marathon route secured Business tourism increased by 50% by 2020 Transport and Hospitality for 2010 world cup

Ongoing Ongoing

355

EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department

Increased inward investment in skills and technology, property and sustainable development Economic Development

Definition of Approach Definition of Target Groups Interventions planned

Consultative, facilitating and informed by research and analysis The business sector and labour, community and government and internal departments Forums with sectors of the economy Partnership with GEDA Model for economic regeneration of cities, towns and suburbs to harness investments Ekurhuleni Development Company reach and range to entire area Facilitate economic friendly municipal procedures and regulations Promote and market investment for sustainable development Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Actions

KPAs Strategic Objectives

Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing

Co-ordinate interactions with internal and external stakeholders on investments

Alignment of provincial and local investment programmes

Dedicated co-ordination of investment leads and facilitate the follow-up of investors queries within the municipality

Market EMM as a friendly investment destination with the City Region Programme

Implement unique investment attractive content with realistic and direct material for investors linked to national, provincial and local GDS

Devise Investment Products – at least one per year

Ongoing

Facilitate the review and development of economic activity friendly by-laws

Regulation in line with the needs of society and the economy

Input into by-laws, policy and regulations with respect to:

Reports on economic aspects

Facilitate municipal procedures that promote economic activity

Improved accessibility of government and a reduction of timeframes linked to responses

 Retail businesses formal and informal  Service businesses formal and informal  Food Outlets formal and informal  Accommodation outlets Development of systems and processes to shorten responses to: Release and Identification of Land   Zoning  EIA

Reports on suggested improvements

356

 

Building Plans Rates Certificates

EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department

Increased inward investment in skills and technology, property and sustainable development Economic Development

Definition of Approach Definition of Target Groups Interventions planned

Consultative, facilitating and informed by research and analysis The business sector and labour, community and government and internal departments Forums with sectors of the economy Partnership with GEDA Model for economic regeneration of cities, towns and suburbs to harness investments Ekurhuleni Development Company reach and range to entire area Facilitate economic friendly municipal procedures and regulations Promote and market investment for sustainable development Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Actions

KPAs Strategic Objectives

Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing

Co-ordinate interactions with internal and external stakeholders on investments

Alignment of provincial and local investment programmes

Dedicated co-ordination of investment leads and facilitate the follow-up of investors’ queries within the municipality

Market EMM as a friendly investment destination with the City Region Programme

Implement unique investment attractive content with realistic and direct material for investors linked to national, provincial and local GDS

Devise Investment Products – at least one per year

Ongoing

Facilitate the review and development of economic activity friendly by-laws

Regulation in line with the needs of society and the economy

Input into by-laws, policy and regulations with respect to:

Reports on economic aspects

Improved accessibility of government and a reduction of timeframes linked to responses

Retail businesses, formal & informal   Service businesses, formal & informal  Food Outlets formal and informal  Accommodation outlets Development of systems and processes to shorten responses to:

Reports on suggested

Facilitate municipal procedures that promote economic activity

357

     EMM GDS Landscape EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

improvements

ECONOMIC LANDSCAPE INVESTMENT PROMOTION COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING:KPA - ADVERTISING To provide and maintain excellent Marketing and Communications services to both external and internal clients All Ekurhuleni Stakeholders  Potential Investors  Businesses in Ekurhuleni  Current Investors  Rate Payers  Tourists  Developers  Ekurhuleni Departments  Partners (E.g. GEDA, DTI, TISA SEDA, Blue IQ) Business in Ekurhuleni : Improvement in aided recall and increased pride 2007/2008 Current Investors : Increase external awareness of Ekurhuleni Brand Potential Investors : Exhibition, conference and gala business events • • • • • •

Strategic Objectives

Release and Identification of Land Zoning EIA Building Plans Rates Certificates

Improvement in unaided recall Improvement in development growth, reduction in attraction rate Stimulate interest in development opportunities around the R21 as well as sectors industries aligned to the ORTIA IDZ Establish foreign companies’ call centres within Ekurhuleni Establish a learning institution to train people for the call centre industry within Ekurhuleni for EMM labour market Establish relevant sectors, on a rotation basis, to have a presence at the ITB, involving organised business. Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

Annual Targets + Deadlines

358

Promote Ekurhuleni with local and international markets to attract investment to the region



Awareness index



Number of new investments or attrition rate reduced

• •

Level of understanding of Ekurhuleni's offerings

Package identified investment opportunities

Investment advertising in local and foreign media Publish investment promotions and marketing communication productions Refinement of Investment website Participate in national and international exhibitions and trade missions

• Determine USPs and decide on prime opportunities to package • Projects to package: o R21 corridor, o Urban renewal; o Tax Incentives;

Number of attractive packages

2007/2008

2007/2008

• Identify opportunities for EMM region for key development : o Call Centre Destination o Business Process Outsourcing o World Cup 2010 Soccer

Facilitate investment

Platform for local business to have direct access to over 1 million business visitors to ORTIA



Promote the region at the ABSA International Trade Bureau



Facilitate investment with GEDA, TISA, EBA, etc



Embassy programme



Establish personal contact with identified investors base, as per research

2007/2008

359



Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures

Planned improvements in Service

Establish / Contribute to key Developments fast tracking teams, e.g. DEC for big projects

INVESTMENT PROMOTION AND FACILITATION Infrastructure Services – Civil Works (Outdoor Advertising) To control and manage Outdoor Advertising in EMM All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. That is all business, residents, general public, people who work in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality. They are categorised as: • Residential • Previously disadvantaged Residential Areas • Business +/or commercial • Industrial • Residential • Alleviate the placement of advertising signage. • Previously disadvantaged Residential Areas • Introduce the provision of service providing advertising mediums • Business and/or commercial • Promote and control the erection of advertising signage • Industrial • Promote and control the erection of advertising signage • Applications • To reduce illegal signage The Civil Works Programme indicates the following targets: • Ensure that all new advertising signage conforms to by-laws and policy • Increase the number of legally erected signs and removal of illegal signs • Procure the service of contractors for service providing advertising mediums • Initiate awareness campaigns

360

Strategic Objectives Control and manage Outdoor Advertising in EMM

Key Performance Indicators Control and manage in terms of policy and by-laws

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Ensure that all new advertising signage conforms by conducting information sessions, awareness campaigns and skills development of personnel inclusive of the revision of by-laws and policies. Increase number of legal signs by developing uniform evaluation procedures for applications to be evaluated by Central Committee and determine positions of sites to be procured. Increase the removal of illegal signs by surveying and auditing signs in the road reserve to determine their status. Compile an inspection programme and action plan to remove and facilitate the necessary legal action where required. Procure the services of contractors for the provision of service providing advertising mediums. The requirements are to be ascertained and documents developed for tender adjudication.

Annual Targets + Deadlines Continuous

80% of applications within 90 days

Inspection of 5% of all signage quarterly

Every five years

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7.2.6

FOCUS AREA 13:

ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION

EMM GDS Focus Area Strategic Department Definition of Approach Definition of Target Groups Interventions planned

KPAs

Strategic Objectives Monitor the implementation of a Supply Chain Management Policy to support economic development

Monitor the targets set on procurement

Board Based Economic Transformation - An inclusive wealth Generating economy Economic Development Consultative, facilitating and informed by research and analysis The business sector, community and internal departments Forums with sectors of the economy Proudly South Africa Programme Interdepartmental LED forum Special Purpose Vehicles – Model to regenerate local economies, Business Linkage centres and industry clusters In-house data gathering Align procurement processes for economic development Promote the growth of entrepreneurship Strategic Advise on Council Utilities and Entities Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Deadlines Actions Harnessing of municipal Annual report on the impact of procurement Ongoing procurement for local economic on the local economy, reporting specifically development on the number of businesses and value of procurement Municipal Procurement aligned with 20% start-up and 70% BEE target (including cooperatives)

Municipal Procurement dedicated to promote new entrants in the economy

Annual Report on procurement to National Target groups: youth, women and people with disabilities, and on cooperatives Annual report

Annual Report

Promote local buying from local producers

Linking municipal procurement to local SMMEs

Municipal Procurement monitored with respect to BEE Number of bids awarded by Council to local companies reported on annually

Facilitate the growth and

Harness the national SEDA

Number of SMMEs supported with non-

Annual report

362

contribution of SMMEs

programme and GEP for local benefit

financial assistance reported on annually

Encourage Ekurhuleni based companies buy from SMMEs and cooperatives

Engagement with Business Linkage Centres to procure from local enterprises

Annual report on the number of SMMEs mentored by BLCs and awarded private sector procurement contracts

Facilitate and review alternate service delivery approaches

Ensure a tailored approach and method to review, based on the core needs of municipal departments

Strategic Management of the Fresh Produce Market

Finalise options for improved services linked to national, provincial and local GDS outcomes

Annual report

Annual report on the number of cooperatives awarded tenders by the private Sector, through the EBA members Targeted assessments of municipal services Annual Report linked to economic sustainability imperatives

Report on the impact of the market in the agricultural sector with respect to markets and linkages to local producers

Annual report

363

7.3 7.3.1

THE SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT LANDSCAPE FOCUS ARE 14: POVERTY AND UNEMPLOYMENT

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Labour absorption and Job Creation Roads Transport and Civil Works – KPA: Roads and Stormwater Services To Provide and Create employment opportunities through construction of Road and Stormwater Infrastructure All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality especially those unemployed citizens that are unable to sustain employment. These persons will be identified and sourced from the following areas: • Informal settlements • Previously Disadvantaged Residential Areas • Informal settlements • Identification of Construction projects that will provide labour based construction • Residential • Identification of Construction projects that will provide labour based construction • The Roads Building Program indicates the following targets: • Expenditure of a minimum 15 % annually of the total budget on job creation projects • Attain an expenditure of 100 % of budget expenditure on identified EPWP Projects by 2006 The reduction of unemployment rate within the boundaries of Ekurhuleni while simultaneously. Eliminating the service delivery backlogs within current Informal Settlements and previously disadvantaged residential areas.

364

Strategic Objectives Create Job Opportunities

Key Performance Indicators Budget to be allocated for Job Creation

Budget expenditure on identified EPWP projects

7.3.2

Implement identified EPWP projects

Annual Targets + Deadlines 15% Percentage of budget expenditure on job creation per annum 100% budget expenditure on identified EPWP projects

FOCUS AREA 15: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Job Creation and Development of SMME’s

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS HOUSING

The function of provision of housing within the EMM is administered as follows and includes: • Planning • Project Implementation • Housing Support Services • Property and Institutional Services These services include financial management but do not take into account funding and budget allocation, which resides within the jurisdiction of national and provincial government. In general the following list of services is currently rendered by the EMM Department of Housing: • Policy formulation, planning & implementation. • Financial support in terms of policy. • Facilitation of the subsidy administration process. • Project management. • Property management. • Provision of information on housing. • Provision of rental accommodation. • Identification of community housing needs. • Identification and acquisition of land. • Facilitation of feasibility studies. • Provision of forums for community participation.

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• • • • • • Definition of Customer

Housing Criteria

Monitoring of land invasion, relocation assistance. Facilitation and management of infrastructure services installation and construction of housing units. Facilitation of the township establishment process. Funding the provision of emergency water services to informal settlements. Execution of government programmes. Facilitation of the establishment of Public Private Partnerships.



The number of households who are potential seekers of new housing, who are desirous of subsidised housing and who qualify for a housing subsidy within the Ekurhuleni boundaries. In general, people seek new housing because of the following factors, among others: o they are currently inadequately housed in terms of both type of dwelling and overcrowding (measured in terms of number of households per unit); o affordable rental housing; and o they are likely to be desirous of a house bringing in the aspects of preference in Ekurhuleni. • The determined qualified need should be used to set targets, according to which short- and long-term strategic planning and policy direction should be set. • Beneficiaries on the 1996-1997 Housing Waiting List • Beneficiaries on the 1998 onwards Housing Demand List • Informal settlers • Informal dwellings on serviced stands Adequate Housing • ‘adequate shelter’ is measured by legal security of tenure; the availability of services; materials, facilities and infrastructure; affordability; habitability; accessibility; location; and cultural adequacy • Maximising the use of existing infrastructure resources by encouraging more intensive and diverse densities and housing typologies • Providing an improved emergency service to all households currently below a basic level of service. The emergency service consists of a communal toilet facility with water supply, connected to a sewerage system where possible. • Providing a full level of service to all households by the year 2014 Sustainable Housing “Sustainable human settlements are settlements that work. They are settlements in which people live, in which they shop, seek entertainment, care for their children, and socialise and celebrate important holidays or events with their friends and neighbours. Sustainable human settlements are settlements in which people access social amenities such as healthcare clinics, libraries, schools, and so on. Sustainable human settlements are also settlements in which people vote and express their opinions freely; in which they work and pay taxes; and in which all of these things are possible without putting undue stress on the community, the family, the individual, the economy, or the environment.” (Shisaka Development Management Services 2004) Specific Actions will include:

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• • • • • •

Thinking outside the box More aggressive borrowing Reconsidering the package of services provided Leveraging better off the existing SHS infrastructure and off existing housing stock Improving the SHS multipliers of housing delivery Promoting small landlords and scale and home based industries

Spatially Integrated Housing Vision Transport Orientated Development approach to link previous disadvantaged communities into the broader economic and social urban fabric Priority focus will be given to: • Informal settlement upgrading, including densification (where land is suitable) • Greenfields developments, including densification • Inclusionary housing processes specifically aimed at establishing Sustainable Human Settlements through a mixed income, typology, density and support social infrastructure approach • Affordable Rental Accommodation and Social Housing (through own Social Housing Development Company) • Public/Private Partnership Funding (Bridge financing from World Bank to enable fast tracking of delivery) • Intervention projects required (Rail, road, hubs) • Integrated, Mixed Income and Typologies, Transport Orientated Development and Higher Density development Policies of significant importance are: • settlement upgrading and relocation in terms of Municipal migration plans, • inclusionary housing policy, • social housing policy, • urban renewal policy, and • transport orientated development. Poverty Alleviation and Job Creation • •

Act together to achieve the tasks of reconstruction and development in a People's Contract to create work and fight poverty in the context of Expanded Public Works Programme Rolling out learnership and internship initiatives on a massive scale through infrastructure and housing implementation projects. Particularly the Essential Services Programme to be enrolled with the Department of Public Works as part of contribution to the Expanded

367

Public Works Programme Expanded Public Works Programmes: • Ensure that labour-intensive mechanisms are utilised for the installation of services. • Ensure that the contractors limit the utilisation of professional personnel for the execution of the work to key areas, should such expertise not be available within the community. • All personnel and labourers to be recruited from the local community. • Ensure that the contractor establish a Labour Desk Good Governance Relevant issues in addressing the institutional framework for housing delivery in Ekurhuleni include the following: • The underlying management principles in relation to identified targets, ensuring the elimination of duplication and inefficiencies. • Determination of decision-making processes as well as roles and responsibilities of the various role players. • Identification of streamlining process that will ensure the take-up of the project management office (PMO) methodology at local government level. • Overview of the Process for the achievement of the institutional framework, especially as it relates to the implementation of accreditation. Integrated Service Delivery One of the critical and most urgent challenges is to accelerate the programme of ensuring that the homeless, and those who live in squalor, have decent houses built on well-located land and access to basic services such as water, sanitation and electricity. In order to promote focused sustainable housing development, an Integrated Service Plan will be developed. The overall purpose and objectives of the Integrated Services Plan are as follows: • Improve impact of intergovernmental investment in specific localities and ensure integration of the Housing Delivery process with Government Departments and Local Authority initiatives. • Promoting effective and efficient use of infrastructure • Promoting spatial integration and cohesion of the urban form • Strengthening of activity and economic linkages • Optimising the development potential of suitable development zones Backlog Figures

Backlogs Informal Structures Informal structures /waiting list /backyard shacks Land required 2010 Land required 2025

130 765 177 065 4274 ha 5107 ha

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Housing required 2010 Housing required 2114

Planned improvements in Service

• • • • •

108 000 units 129 000 units

Pro-poor focus with regard to development initiatives Upgrading for growth with specific reference to informal settlements Transport Orientated Development (TOD) Implementing mixed density and housing typologies through inclusionary housing and social housing processes Launching urban regeneration processes

Specific Implementation Programmes are: (For complete list see Annexure A - Budgets and Programming, in the Ekurhuleni COMPREHENSIVE SUSTAINABLE HUMAN SETTLEMENTS PLAN 2006-2025 available at the EMM Housing Department.) • Upgrading of informal settlement programme • Top Structures through Community Builders Programme and People’s Housing Process • Top Structures following Essential services • Special projects • Inclusionary housing • Neighbourhood Development Grant • Social Housing • Priority Top 20 • Affordable Rental Accommodation and Social Housing (through own Housing Development Company) • Public/Private Partnership Funding (bridge financing from World Bank to enable fast tracking of delivery) BNG INTERVENTIONS 1.Stimulating the housing Market

2. Supporting Urban Renewal and Inner-City regeneration

Proposed actions Enhance access to title Remove barriers to Housing Trade by amending the buy-back clause. Providing Housing Finance and Financial Literacy By encouraging Social (medium density) Housing, and increasing

National policies to support programme implementation Enhanced Extended Discount Benefit Scheme EEDBS Individual Housing Subsidies

Finance linked Individual Subsidy Programme Employer Assisted Housing Consumer Education and Support Social Housing

369

and Inner-City regeneration

density) Housing, and increasing effective demand, by introducing new access to loan finance in the middle income group above the R3500 income limit.

3. Progressive Informal Settlement Eradication

By introducing a new in-situ Informal Settlement Upgrading instrument and redirecting the People’s Housing Process. Integrate previously excluded groups into the city and the benefits it offers, and to ensure the development of more integrated, functional and environmentally sustainable human settlements, towns and cities. Addressing Housing Quality Enhancing Settlement Design Enhancing Housing Design

4. Promoting Densification and Integration

5. Enhancing the Housing Product

Rental Housing State-Owned Rental Housing Hostel Redevelopment Transitional Housing Communal Housing Cooperatives Backyard rental (being finalised) Informal Settlement Upgrading People’s Housing Process Inclusionary Housing Programme (being finalised)

The National Housing Programme: Rectification of Houses Delivered between 15 March 1994 and 31 March 2002

The National Housing Programme: Rectification of Houses Delivered prior to 15 March 1994 Ensuring NHBRC registration of Subsidised Houses

Financial: • To Impact Budgets and Planning by other National and Provincial Departments to support plans • Implement Council and Provincial 5 Year capital investment programme through effective management of capital expenditure in terms of: o Prepare 5 year capital investment programme. o Prepare budget.

370

o o o

Monitor and control expenditure. Implement and provide reports on a monthly basis. External Funding to fast track development.

Good Governance • At municipal level, efforts will focus particularly on building capacity for municipal officials, councillors and emerging contractors through our Programme Management Offices (PMO), to ensure efficient delivery of housing. • Accreditation and the SDBIP process. • Administrative support given to all Directorates. • Investigation of a Management Information System. • Quality Management, Human Resource Management related issues such as: o Skills Audit o Training o Equity Plan and Gender aspects o Facilities Management, Financial Management , Risk and Asset Management Specific Programmes are: Planning and Development • Upgrading for Growth • Emergency areas • Intervention Projects • Higher Density Residential Programmes • Twenty Priority Towns Programme • Neighbourhood Partnership Development Grant • Inclusionary Housing Project Implementation • Upgrading and relocation of informal settlements • Rural Housing • Community Based Projects Property and Institutional Services • Refurbishment of Rental Property (RORP) • Repair to damaged housing • Social Housing

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• Downsizing Programme • Resettlement and Relocation Assistance Support Services • Managing the Waiting List and Housing Demand Programme • Transfer of Residential Properties (TORPS) • Regularisation and Free Transfer of Houses (RETRO) • Housing Projects: After Care Guidelines • Subsidy Admin • Policy and Research

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS / ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Executive Director Housing 1. Financial Management Implement 5 year capital investment programme through effective management of capital expenditure 2..Infrastructure and Service Facilitate and manage services installation and construction of houses

Implement Council’s 5 year capital investment programme

Implement Council’s 5 year capital investment programme through 80% of Capex spent i.t.o IDP by end of June 2008

   

Prepare 5 year capital investment programme Prepare budget Monitor and control expenditure Implement and provide reports on a monthly basis

Provision of Houses

Construction of 8000 houses constructed by EMM and GDoH

   

Identify and prioritise projects Align with Council’s IDPs Facilitate and monitor projects Provide reports on a monthly basis

3. Meet the housing needs of individual customers and communities in an effective, efficient and accessible way

Provision of essential services

Facilitate the provision of essential services to 7000 stands with the GDoH and EMM

   

Identify and prioritise projects Align with Council’s IDPs Facilitate and monitor projects Provide reports on a monthly basis

4.Planning

IDP

Finalise and submit Reviewed IDP with linked Investment Plan and Capex budget by end May 2008

 

Compile and submit IDP for Housing by end May 2006 Prepare annual bid for funding to Province for subsidy funding by end July 2008

372

Informal Settlement Programme Development Plan

5. Facilitate the social housing programme through identified needs analysis

Project identification

Land agreements

Update Informal Settlement Programme by March 2008 (Land identification) Submit Precinct Development plans for two sensitive housing development areas by May 2008 Facilitate a functional and updated Housing Information Database

 Review MHDP by May 2008 Land identification to match backlog by March 2006 Discuss land proposals with Dev. Planning and Environment by March 2006  The two developments must be identified and completed by May 2006  

Facilitate land acquisition according to allocated GDoH budget for identified and approved parcels of land Monitoring of land invasion management based on information received from public safety (Subject to Public Safety Process and Decisions)



6. Implement and maintain effective property management, policy and procedures

Land invasion management

7. Property and institutional services

Lease agreements

Compile and update register of lease agreements for all rental properties by end June 2008

   

8. Ensure implementation of the Hostel Redevelopment Programme through effective policies and processes

Policies

Continue with the implementation of approved policies



Number of hostels converted into self-contained units 9. Democracy and Governance

   

Increase compliance with all applicable legislation and policies from 80% to 100% in accordance

Determine baseline based on information received from Public Safety (Provincial Surveys conducted) Compile database Evaluate growth in informal settlements Facilitate resettlement in conjunction with all stakeholders



Determine status quo Register tenants Conclude lease agreements Provide information to the Finance Department for Credit Control purposes Inclusion of hostels in the migration plan. Implementation of Uniform Tariff Policy to deal with emergency repairs of houses for the indigent families who participate in the Council indigent programme House rules for affordable rental accommodation (Hostels)

  

Facilitate archive system Facilitate resolution tracking system Facilitate policy and procedure registry



Increase compliance with all applicable legislation

Database updated by June 2008 Facilitate functional PMO system support on an ongoing basis Signed agreements for parcels of land

373

10. Ensure compliance with legislative and regulatory framework

Operational efficiency

11. Level of compliance

National Housing Programme

12. Ensure compliance with relevant legislative and statutory framework

BEE Compliance

Employment Equity HIV AND AIIDS

Relevant statutory compliance

6.Resolution implementation

with approved phased approach by end June 2006 Increase operational efficiency of the Department from 70% to 85% by 30 June 2008 Facilitate accreditation programme Facilitate Plan – Management Plan – Systems Plan Ensure that all procurement of services complies with BEE regulations Employment equity targets in accordance with EE Plan Facilitate and co-ordinate Departmental HIV / AIDS as developed by HIV / AIDS Unit 100% compliance with the Municipal Finance Management Act, Municipal Structures Act, Occupational Health and Safety Act 100% implementation of Council and Managerial resolutions across all functions by 30 June 2008

       

Determine work procedures Monitor office administration systems Tracking of resolutions Monthly progress on Capex and Opex Manage HR matters effectively Implement standards according to ISO 9001 Compile plans as per scheduled target dates Facilitate programmes according to plans

      

Establish baseline data Review procurement processes Report on adherence to BEE principles Establish targets Recruit employees according to demographic requirements Implement developed awareness campaign Monitor implementation

 

Determine current level of compliance Institute relevant processes and procedures to ensure compliance

 

Monitor implementation of tracking system Ensure implementation of council resolutions, management decisions

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KPA: Planning 1. Development Plan

2. Informal Settlement Programme

3. IDP

4. Project identification

5. Housing information

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE KPA: Project Implementation 1. Implement Council’s 5 year capital investment programme

KPI : Policy and Planning : Prepare and submit Development Plans for development areas to support funding model

Development Plans must be identified and completed by June 2008. Update Informal Settle Programme (Land identification). • Land identification to match backlog by March 2008. • Discuss land proposals with Development Planning and Environment. Finalise and submit Reviewed IDP with linked Investment Plan and • Compile and submit IDP for Capex budget by end May 2008. Housing by end May 2006. • Prepare annual bid for funding to Province for subsidy funding by end July 2005. • Review NHDP by May 2005 Identify higher density residential and inclusionary housing projects Prepare site development plans or development plans for identified areas by June 2008 Housing information: Facilitate a functional and updated housing Functional database support on information database. an ongoing basis. MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS / ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Implement Council’s 5 year capital investment programme through 80% of Capex spent i.t.o IDP by end of June 2008

• • • •

2. Implement Provincial 5 year capital investment programme

Implement Provincial 5 year capital investment programme through 80% of Capex spent i.t.o IDP by end of June 2008.



Prepare 5 year capital investment programme. Prepare budget. Monitor and control expenditure. Implement and provide reports on a monthly basis. Prepare 5 year capital investment programme.

375

• • • 3. Provision of houses

Facilitate the provision of 7000 houses constructed through approved projects.

• • • •

4. Provision of essential services

Facilitate the provision of essential services to 8000 stands

• • • •

KPA: Property And Institutional Services 1. Land invasion management

Monitoring of land invasion management based on information received from public safety (Subject to Public Safety Process and Decisions)

• • •

2. Lease agreements

Increase the finalisation and update of lease agreements for flats and hostels.

• • •

Prepare budget. Monitor and control expenditure. Implement and provide reports on monthly basis. Identify and prioritise projects. Align with Council’s IDPs. Facilitate and monitor projects. Provide reports on a monthly basis. Identify and prioritise projects. Align with Council’s IDPs. Facilitate and monitor projects. Provide reports on a monthly basis.

Compile database. Evaluate growth in informal settlements. Facilitate resettlement in conjunction with all stakeholders. Ensure contracts for all registered tenants. Conclude lease agreements. Provide information to the Finance Department for Credit Control purposes.

376

3. Social housing institutions consolidation

Facilitate and Initiate development of plans for social housing.

4. Implementation of the Hostel Redevelopment Programme

Co-ordinate the implementation of the Hostel Redevelopment Programme to ensure conversion of Buya-Futhi Hostel into selfcontained units. Subject to funding received from Gauteng Department of housing and own funding (CLF).

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE

KPA: Support Services 5. Implement Council’s 5 year capital investment programme 6. Capex Expenditure

7. Ensure compliance with legislative and regulatory framework Increase compliance with all applicable legislation

8. Increase operational efficiency

9. National Housing Programme

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS / ACTIONS

Implement Council’s 5 year capital investment • programme through 80 % of Capex spent in terms • of IDP by end of June 2008 • • • • Increase compliance with all applicable legislation • and policies from 80% to 100% in accordance with • approved phased approach by end June 2008 • • • Increase operational efficiency of the Department • from 70% to 85% by 30 June 2008 • • • • Facilitate accreditation programme. • • Facilitate implementation of HR Plan, •

• Submission to Council. • Obtain legal advise • Identify possible projects. Assist in the procurement of funding. Obtain buy-in by hostel residents, community and other stakeholders. Initiate processes for the redevelopment of Tokoza 1, 2 and 3 and Sethokga Hostel.

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Develop archive system. Implement resolution tracking system. Develop resolution tracking system. Develop policy and procedure registry. Determine work procedures. Monitor office administration system. Develop archive system. Implement resolution tracking system. Develop policy and procedure registry. Determine work procedures. Monitor office administration systems. Tracking of resolutions Monthly progress on Capex and Opex Manage HR matters effectively Implement standards according to ISO 9001 Compile plans as per scheduled target dates. Facilitate implementation according to plans.

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10. Land agreements

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives All citizens of Ekurhuleni be housed in integrated and functional sustainable human settlements

Management Plan, Systems Plan. Facilitate land acquisition according to allocated GDoH budget for identified and approved parcels of land.

Signed agreements for parcels of land by June 2008.

Creation and promotion of Sustainable Human Settlements Infrastructure Services – Roads and Stormwater Services To provide planning for the Eradication of backlog of Road and Stormwater Infrastructure Services All stakeholders within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality who have been excluded during the previous political dispensation. They are categorised as: • Informal settlements • Previously Disadvantaged Residential Areas • Informal settlements • Provision of Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure Master plans that are integrated with Housing Masterplans • Previously Disadvantaged Residential Areas • Provision of Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure Master plans that ensure that present road and stormwater infrastructure is equitable • Provision of Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure Master plans that are integrated with Housing Master plans That planned, focused and integrated master planning of roads and stormwater forms part of the Integrated Infrastructure Development Key Performance Indicators To develop a sustainable Integrated Infrastructure Development Plan

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Development of Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure Implementation of business plans Development of Roads and Stormwater Maintenance business plans

Annual Targets + Deadlines Fully developed Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure Implementation of Business plan with annual revisions Fully developed Roads and Stormwater Infrastructure Maintenance Business plan with annual revisions

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7.3.3

FOCUS AREA 16: HEALTH CARE AND FACILITIES

EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

Access to Health Care and the Impact of HIV/AIDS and Poverty Related Diseases HEALTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT To provide a comprehensive primary health care, municipal health services and community development service. The community of Ekurhuleni In line with National, Provincial and Local policies. N/A See details from divisions

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

KPA: FAMILY HEALTH Minimisation Of LifeThreatening Communicable Diseases

Tuberculosis Cure Rate

Provision of voluntary counselling and testing.

% Of New Smear Positive (+) Tuberculosis Patients That Converted To Negative (-) At The End Of The Treatment Period

64%

Number of new smear positive (+) tuberculosis patients that converted to negative (-) at the end of the treatment period

1,300

% of fixed health facilities that provide dedicated voluntary counselling and testing services.

100% of Facilities

379

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Intensify HIV and aids campaign (door-todoor)

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Number of fixed health facilities that provide dedicated voluntary counselling and testing services.

78

Number of tuberculosis and HIV & aids awareness campaigns

1

Number of people to be targeted for tuberculosis and HIV & aids awareness campaigns

3,000

Number of world aids day campaigns

1

Number of people targeted for world aids day campaigns

12,000

Number of campaigns conducted for condom week

1

Number of people to be targeted for campaigns for condom week

1,300

Number of HIV & aids workplace campaigns

1

Number of people to be targeted for HIV & aids workplace campaigns

1,250

380

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Immunisation coverage rate

Adherence to sexually transmitted infection protocol

Number of campaigns on saving mothers and babies

Improved nutritional status of children under 5 years of age

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

% of children under the age of 1year that are fully immunised in accordance with the national expanded immunisation programme policy.

85%

Number of children under the age of one (1) year that are fully immunised in accordance with the national expanded immunisation programme policy.

262,043

% of facilities that adhered to the STI protocol.

100%

Number of facilities that adhered to the STI protocol.

78

Number of campaigns conducted on cervical screening per region

1 Campaign per SDR

Number of people to be targeted for the campaigns on cervical cancer screening per region

1,000

Number of breastfeeding campaigns conducted per service delivery region

9 (3 SDR)

Number of people to be targeted for the breastfeeding campaigns

5,000

(< 5 year Population)

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STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS Ensure the prevention, diagnosis and effective management of chronic diseases

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Number of awareness campaigns on chronic conditions implemented per service delivery region

4

Number of people to be targeted for the awareness campaigns on chronic conditions

3,000

Forum for traditional health practitioners established

3

Number of traditional health practitioners to be targeted

300

Number of sustainable and comprehensive programmes implemented

15

Number of awareness pathologies presented

9

Number of implemented programmes on care, support and protection of children

9

Number of early childhood practitioners trained

36

Deliver awareness on sexual harassment programme for women

Number of sexual harassment programmes presented

9

To improve socio-economic status women

Number of programmes implemented / workshops on economic development

6

Establishment of a traditional health practitioners forum

KPA: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Improve education, Deliver sustainable and comprehensive information on social programme for youth economic status for all target groups Implement awareness on social pathologies for men Provide care support and protection of children including orphans and vulnerable children Link early childhood development with pew

382

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Enhance training and educational programmes for optimal functioning and extra income for people with disabilities Deliver awareness campaigns for older persons Reduction in the extent of the indigent register

Educational programmes to enhance training and education implemented

4

Awareness campaigns implemented

9

Number of indigents exposed to an exit programme

24

Strengthen religious forum

Functional forum

Development and implementation of holistic and comprehensive developmental programmes for the identified community target groups.

Comprehensive programmes implemented for the various community target groups

Number of programmes implemented

24

The reduction of the number of indigent families on the indigent register

Reduction in the extent of the indigent register.

Number of indigents exposed to an exit programme.

2700

Number of food premises with a COA as a % of the total formal food premises

95%

The reduction of the number of indigent families on the indigent register Community participation

KPA: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Ensure safe provision of Percentage of formal food premises issued food with certificates of acceptability

383

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

Food samples taken that are compliant

% of food samples taken that are compliant to standards

% of food samples taken that are compliant to standards

80%

To ensure safe living environment

Inspected residential premises without rodent infestation

% of residential premises inspected without rodent infestation

80%

Rodent infestation hot spots

Number of rodent-infested hot spots with an active programme expressed as a % of the total hotspots

60%

Compliance with tobacco legislation by formal food premises

% of formal food premises in compliance

85%

Particulate matter air samples compliant with standards

% of particulate air samples compliant with standards

65%

Sulphur dioxide air samples compliant with standards

% of sulphur dioxide air samples compliant with standards

95%

Activities presented that focus on behaviour of high risk groups

Number of activities for age group 15-24

20

Number of activities in informal settlements

10

Pollution control

KPA: HIV / AIDS Prevention of new infections

PROMOTION OF CONDOM UTILISATION

Number of identified distribution points without an interrupted condom supply

384

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES Psycho-social & economic development

MEASURABLE PERFORMANCE TARGETS/ACTIONS

ANNUAL TARGETS + DEADLINES

PLWHAs supported

Number of PLWHAs supported

100

Strengthening of support network

Number of individuals trained to offer support

12

Workplace and community interventions

Number of departments involved

12

Number of staff reached Number of interventions implemented

12000 12

KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Multi sectoral coordination

Community interventions

Number of interventions implemented

12

Hiv & aids door to door campaign

Visits to individual households

Number of houses accessed

1000

Number of individuals reached

4000

Established ward aids fora

Number of established ward aids fora

88

Implement Ekurhuleni aids council

Operational aids council

1

Formalised communitybased HIV and aids structure

385

7.3.1

FOCUS AREA 17: SAFETY AND SECURITY

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Safety and Security Community Safety – Disaster Management To provide an efficient and effective multi disciplinary service, geared on sustainable development of our Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Internal Customers • Council • Mayoral Committee • Portfolio Committee • Top Management • Other Departments External Customers • Community • National Departments • Provincial departments • Other organs of state Effectively ensure Safety and Security None • Infrastructure • Political Will / Backing • Experience and expertise • Innovation • Multi Skilled personnel • Stakeholder involvement

386

KPA: DISASTER MANAGEMENT CENTRE: Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

1. To comply with Disaster Management Legislation in order to achieve disaster risk reduction in line with changing National Guidelines – 80% compliance



2. To provide for multi-disciplinary Disaster Management operations (relief, response, recovery, mitigation and preparedness) to render a comprehensive service to the community





• • • • •



Municipal Disaster Management Framework Head of the Disaster Management Centre

Functional Disaster Management focal points Functional Disaster Management satellite points Disaster Relief Plan Disaster Response Plan Reports on Disaster recovery measures Departmental risk assessment plans (Disaster Plans, evacuation plans, awareness and education) Preparedness Plan for all roleplayers/stakeholders

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Review and submit a Municipal Disaster Management Framework for council approval • Appoint the Head of the Disaster Management centre for the EMM to comply with legislation • Establish Regional Disaster Management focal points • Establish satellite points in the community • Provide relief coordination • Co-ordinate Disaster Response with an emphasis on high risk areas • Advise on disaster recovery measures • Ensure risk reduction across all departments and community, e.g. Disaster Management Information Sessions and Workshops • Co-ordinate the development of

Annual Targets + Deadlines August 2007

June 2007

October 2008 October 2011 Continuous Process Continuous Process

Continuous Process Continuous Process

Continuous Process

387

preparedness plans with role players: * 2010 * Sports and Recreation Bill * Dolomite * Early warning * Awareness Campaigns * Occupational Health and Safety (Employees and other departments) 3. To maintain a Disaster Management Centre (Implement Legislation and Directives)

• • • • •



A functional Disaster Management Advisory Forum Monitor and evaluate compliance of functional Disaster Management framework Regional Risk and Vulnerability Assessments Functional ward / regional Disaster Management volunteer units Submit research results to council for consideration and implementation - trained volunteers Functional Disaster Management Communication system and software



• • •



Maintain the Disaster Management Advisory Forum (all role-players / stakeholders e.g. EMM Departments, NGOs, CBOs, politicians, community etc.) Maintain the Disaster Management Framework for the EMM Conduct Risk and Vulnerability Assessments Maintain a Disaster Management volunteer unit and database in line with legislation utilising ward councillors / communities Conduct research and training

Continuous Process

Continuous Process July 2009 Continuous Process

Continuous Process October 2009 (3 phases)

388

4. To provide effective and efficient emergency communications to enhance service delivery

Establish a functional Disaster Management Communication system and software Develop and have an Emergency Communications Framework approved Determine relevant norms and standards Maintain Call Taking and dispatching Centres Coordinate the alignment of service delivery boundaries and standardised service delivery standards Redevelop the call taking and dispatching software Coordinate the roll out of remote workstations to EMPD and Emergency Services in collaboration with ICT

December 2007

Redevelop radio infrastructure Integrate the various radio communication channels/frequencies/ equipment Migration to SAPS radio

March 2011



Approved Emergency Communications framework





Norms and standards for Emergency Communications Functional Call Taking and Dispatching Centres Aligned boundaries and standards



New call taking and dispatching software Operational Remote workstations





Functional radio infrastructure





Integrated operational system





Procure end-user equipment



• •

• •

5. To provide a metro wide radio communications system for all EMM Departments



• •



December 2007 Continuous Process March 2008

September 2008 March 2008

September 2008

March 2010

389



Functional radio repeater infrastructure Simulcast communications





Functional Regional Radio Technical Workshops





Unfunded vacancies filled





Co-ordinated operational functions





6. To provide for sufficient human resources which support the achievement of operational objectives





Skilled and trained work force

Trained Disaster Management





spectrum to ensure dedicated secure communications for EMPD / Emergency Services (Migrate infrastructure and equipment) Upgrade the radio repeater sites Implement simulcast communication infrastructure (Simultaneous communication on one radio frequency) Establishment of Regional Radio Technical Workshops Motivate for the filling of unfunded positions Establish operational forum with EMPD, Emergency services, MI and role players to enhance service delivery Develop specific training needs and skills to meet compliance of relevant norms and standards in terms of service delivery including learnership training

September 2009 September 2011

September 2011

September 2007

June 2007 March 2009

Continuous Process

390

Volunteers



7. To address anomalies, shortcomings and opportunities

Attendance of HIV/AIDS Workshops



Well-being programmes for officials



Established Disaster Management satellite points



• • •



A functional Disaster Management Communication system





Restructuring process



Train Disaster Management Volunteers in different disciplines (e.g. communications, firstaid, fire fighting etc.) Create opportunities for all employees to attend HIV/AIDS Workshops Maintain opportunity for employees to access well-being programmes Secure sufficient funding for Disaster Management satellite points in identified vulnerable communities e.g. Kwatsa Duza, Vosloorus and Tembisa Secure sufficient funds for the disaster Management Communications system and software Review the current organisational structure

Annually

Annually September 2011

March 2010

September 2007

391

KPA: EMPD Strategic Objectives 1. Perform effective Crime Prevention, Traffic Law Enforcement and By Laws enforcement service

Key Performance Indicators Establish 15 Precinct Stations

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Establish 15 Precinct Stations: • Bronberg – budgeted for 07/08 • Germiston – budgeted for 07/08 • Etwatwa – budgeted for 07/08 • Zonkezizwe – budgeted for 07/08 • Olifantsfontein / Midstream • Vosloorus • Daveyton • Tembisa • Katlehong • Duduza • Kempton Park • Thokoza • Brakpan

Upgrade 5 Precinct Stations

Establish 1 regional office in Eastern Region

• Alberton • Primrose Upgrade 5 Precinct Stations: • Springs – budgeted for 07/08 • Benoni – budgeted for 07/08 • Nigel – budgeted for 07/08 • Edleen – budgeted for 07/08 • Edenvale – budgeted for 07/08 Establish regional office: • Tsakane

Annual Targets + Deadlines • 1st quarter 07/08 – end September 2007 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 • 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 • 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 • 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 • 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 • 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 • 3rd quarter 11/12 – end March 2012 • 3rd quarter 11/12 – end March 2012

• • • • •

3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008

• 4th quarter 10/11 – end June 2011

392

Upgrade 2 regional offices in Southern and Northern Regions

Upgrade regional offices: • Vosloorus • Tembisa

Establish an EMPD communications centre in line with legislation Establish 1 weighbridge in Northern Region

Establish communications centre

Upgrade 5 weighbridges in Southern and Eastern Regions

Upgrade weighbridges: • Wadeville • Springs • Alberton • Nigel • Brakpan Upgrade of specialised services offices: • Boksburg precinct station • Kempton Park (Sierra Bravo)

Upgrade 2 specialised services offices

Establish Equestrian Unit for EMPD Establish Air Wing for EMPD Establish Water Wing for EMPD Acquisition of specialised equipment

• 1st quarter 10/11 – end September 2010 • 1st quarter 11/12 – end September 2011 • 1st quarter 09/10 – end September 2009

Establish weighbridge: • R 21 highway – Kempton Park

Establish Equestrian Unit Establish Air Wing Establish Water Wing Acquisition of specialised equipment: • Speed equipment • Speed equipment for vehicles (Vascar) • Number recognition system • Tracker system • Laptops in vehicles (Natis)

• • • • • •

4th quarter 08/09 – end June 2009

4th quarter 09/10 – end June 2010 4th quarter 09/10 – end June 2010 4th quarter 10/11 – end June 2011 4th quarter 10/11 – end June 2011 4th quarter 11/12 – end June 2012

• 1st quarter 09/10 – end September 2009 • 3rd quarter 09/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 1st quarter 08/09 – end September 2008 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 4th quarter 08/09 – end June 2009

393

2. Provide an effective Technical Service

Upgrade existing Accident Capturing Hub Staffing for Accident Bureau Upgrade 3 Regional Municipal Pounds

Upgrade By Law and Hawker Pound Establish Heavy Motor Vehicle and Container Pound Establish 2 Regional Fuel Stations in Northern and Eastern Regions

Upgrade and expansion of Regional Fuel Station in Southern Region 3. Render an effective Municipal Court Service

Establish 4 Municipal Courts

Establish Camera Mailer Hub

Upgrade existing Accident Capturing Hub Staffing for Accident Bureau Upgrade of Regional Municipal Pounds: • Alberton • Springs • Kempton Park Upgrade By Law and Hawker Pound in Actonville Establish Heavy Motor Vehicle and Container Pound Establish Regional Fuel Stations: • Northern Region • Eastern Region Upgrade and expansion of Regional Fuel Station: • Southern Region Establish Municipal Courts: • Brakpan • Alberton • Vosloorus • Springs Establish Camera Mailer Hub: • Benoni

Establish Summons Hub

Establish Summons Hub: • Elsberg

Establish Warrant of Arrest / Call Centre Hub

Establish Warrant of Arrest / Call Centre Hub: • Kempton Park

• 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 2nd quarter 09/10 – end December 2009 • • • •

3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009

• 2nd quarter 10/11 – end December 2010 • 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009

• 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 • • • •

3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011

• 1st quarter 07/08 – end September 2007 • 1st quarter 07/08 – end September 2007 • 1st quarter 07/08 – end September

394

Establish single postal address for EMPD only Staffing for Municipal Court Service Establish messenger service Establish Refund Section Replace / upgrade ITC equipment Reduce processing costs Streamline and reduce postal costs 4. Provide an effective Training Service

Establish EMPD Training Academy Finalise accreditation of Training Academy Establish 3 accredited Regional Shooting Ranges

Upgrade of Boksburg Shooting Range Train and develop EMPD officials

Establish single postal address for EMPD Staffing for Municipal Court Service Establish messenger service Establish Refund Section Replace / upgrade ITC equipment Reduce processing costs Streamline and reduce postal costs Establish EMPD Training Academy Finalise accreditation of Training Academy Establish accredited Regional Shooting Ranges: • Northern Region • Southern Region • Eastern Region Upgrade of Boksburg Shooting Range Train and develop EMPD officials: • 300 per year

2007 • 2nd quarter 07/08 – end December 2007 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 2nd quarter 07/08 – end December 2007 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 2nd quarter 11/12 – end December 2011 • 1st quarter 08/09 – end September 2008 • 1st quarter 08/09 – end September 2008 • 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 • 2nd quarter 08/09 – end December 2008 • • • •

3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008

• 2nd quarter 07/08 – end December 2007 • 2nd quarter 08/09 – end December 2008 • 2nd quarter 09/10 – end December 2009 • 2nd quarter 10/11 – end December 2010

395

5. Render an effective Security Service

Implement a Demilitarisation Programme for ex-combatants Establish Guard Houses at EMM premises

Install CCTV Cameras and Alarm Systems at EMM premises

6. Uphold Integrity and Standards within the EMPD

Provide accurate and timeous management of information services

Upgrade Access Control at EMM premises Establish Integrity and Standards Head Office building Acquisition of specialised investigation equipment

Establish a Comstat Centre

Implement a Demilitarisation Programme for ex-combatants Establish 68 Guard Houses at EMM premises: • 17 in 08/09 financial year • 17 in 09/10 financial year • 17 in 10/11 financial year • 17 in 11/12 financial year Install CCTV Cameras and Alarm Systems at EMM premises Upgrade Access Control at EMM premises Establish Integrity and Standards Head Office building Acquisition of specialised investigation equipment: • Investigative equipment • Specialised IT equipment Establish a Comstat Centre

• 2nd quarter 11/12 – end December 2011 • 4th quarter 09/10 – end June 2010

• • • • •

3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 3rd quarter 09/10 – end March 2010 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011 3rd quarter 11/12 – end March 2012 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009

• 3rd quarter 08/09 – end March 2009 • 3rd quarter 10/11 – end March 2011

• 1st quarter 07/08 – end September 2007 • 3rd quarter 07/08 – end March 2008 • 1st quarter 09/10 – end September 2009

KPA: EMERGENCY SERVICES Strategic Objectives Sufficient and efficient Human Resources to provide Service Delivery in terms of Emergency Services (Safety and Security, Job Creation, Urban Renewal and Good

Key Performance Indicators To align the organisational structure with SANS 10090 with the aim of rendering equitable services to the community of EMM

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Appoint a consultant to conduct a comprehensive Risk Assessment within the jurisdiction of EMM

Annual Targets + Deadlines 50% of risk assessment – June 2008

396

Governance)

To fill all vacant positions on the current structure of Emergency Services

To enhance the security of personnel and equipment at the work place so as to protect life and property

To implement the OHS program in accordance with NFPA 1500 To implement a uniform Incident Management System and Standard Operating Procedures in terms of SANS 10090 and NFPA 1561 to enhance operational efficiency.

Compare and identify the deficiencies on the current structure based on the minimum requirements of SANS 10090 as reflected by risk assessment report Amend the current organisational structure to be aligned with the requirements of SANS 10090 Submit a progress report to Council on Item regarding the funding of vacant positions

Investigate security at the workplace including Fire Stations Develop security plan to enhance the security of personnel and equipment at the workplace Implement security plans Develop OHS program i.t.o. NPFA 1500 Finalisation of an uniform Incident Management System (IMS)

Develop a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

50% of risk assessment – February 2009 June 2009

December 2009

205 permanent members in 2007/2008

150 reservists in 2007/2008 150 reservists in 2008/2009 150 reservists in 2009/2010 August 2007

February 2008

June 2009 December 2008 October 2007

March 2008

397

The provision and maintenance of physical resources for Emergency Services to meet the requirements of Service Delivery (Safety and Security, Job Creation, Urban Renewal, HIV/AIDS, Poverty Alleviation and Good Governance)

To establish and Implement a Vehicle and Equipment replacement, augmentation and maintenance programme to meet the requirements of SANS 10090

To establish and maintain Emergency services facilities to meet the requirements of SANS 10090

To standardise, maintain and align firewater reticulation systems in

Implement IMS and SOPs Compare and Identify the vehicles and equipment deficiencies based on the minimum requirements of SANS 10090 as reflected by risk assessment report. Developed in Master Strategy 1 Develop a vehicle and equipment replacement, augmentation and maintenance programme Submit proposed programme to Council for approval and funding Implementation of the programme Identify the need for additional facilities and existing deficiencies based on the minimum requirements of SANS 10090 as reflected by risk assessment report. (Master Strategy 1) Design a master plan for Emergency Services facility development. Submit proposed master plan to Council for approval. Develop a programme to implement master plan and submit to Council for approval and funding. Implementation of the programme Institute a bilateral committee between MI and Emergency

July 2008 November 2007

February 2008

March 2008 Ongoing April 2008

October 2008

January 2009 March 2009

Ongoing April 2007

398

accordance with the relevant standards and by laws

To develop capacity and infrastructure of the training centre to comply with service requirements in terms of SANS 10090 and Environmental Legislation

Services to manage the firewater reticulation system according to the relevant standards. The bilateral committee to establish maintenance programme on the current firewater reticulation system. Implement the maintenance programme. Provide for compatibility between resources and firewater reticulation systems. MI to assess and report on the current firewater reticulations system in comparison to the requirements of SANS 10090. (Based on the risk assessment results, in consultation with Emergency Services). Develop a master plan to align the firewater reticulation systems to meet SANS 10090 requirements, in consultation with Emergency Services MI to develop a programme to implement master plan in conjunction with Emergency Services Implementation of the programme. Use job skills analysis to determine structural training needs. Determine provider/capacity and

November 2007

October 2008 October 2008

January 2009

June 2009

December 2009

Ongoing July 2007

July 2008

399

Legislative compliance (Safety and Security, Community participation, Urban Renewal, HIV & AIDS, and Good Governance

To ensure compliance with the Memorandum of Agreement between Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and Gauteng Provincial Government Department of Health, for the rendering of Ambulance Services

Enhancement of the administrative To develop and streamline management processes within Emergency Services and administrative systems for the (Good Governance and Safety and Emergency Services Security)

infrastructure required to address training needs. Submit report to Council on deficiencies and strategies in terms of existing training infrastructure and programmes. Develop business plans to deal with deficiencies in terms of training infrastructure. Implement business plans Identify shortcomings in relation to Norms and Standards requirements to render an effective ambulance service.

Develop a strategy to address shortcomings. Implement strategy. Revisit the PrDP and HPCSA policy and resubmit to Council Determine the administration, reporting needs and requirements of all stakeholders that Emergency Services interact with (internal and external). Assess all Emergency Services administration systems and procedures to determine workability and deficiencies. Develop an integrated streamlined management and administrative systems with control instruments. Implement the approved

September 2008

June 2009

Start July 2009 May 2007

November 2007 July 2008 February 2008 October 2007

March 2008

March 2009

July 2009

400

management and administrative systems. KPA: LICENSING SERVICES Strategic Objectives 1. To establish a comprehensive, accessible and fully capacitated licensing service in Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality so as to render efficient service

Key Performance Indicators • • • • •

Acceleration of service delivery and good governance Public Awareness Campaigns Stakeholder involvement Centralised Help Desk Educational programme to empower the under serviced

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Approval of a Customer Care Centre • Full implementation of the Best Practice Model (MVRA, VTS & DLTC) • Facilitation of on-line registration for motor dealers in each region • Implementation of DLTC Business Plans • Marketing Strategy for DLTC and VTS • Establish centralised Help Desk • Setting of SMART and realistic performance targets in consultation with the community and other stakeholders • Number of Public Awareness and Educational Programmes

Annual Targets + Deadlines September 2008 Ongoing process December 2008 December 2008 July 2008 July 2008 July 2007

Ongoing process

401



Fully staffed customer orientated licensing and testing offices

• • •

• •

Aligned structure/Restructuring process

• • • •



Secure funds for unfunded vacancies and effect appointments Motivate for the filling of unfunded positions Motivate the increase of staffing levels (i.e. examiners and cashiers) to implement the DLTC business plans and increase staffing capacity to be able to deal with service demands Compliance with Best Practice Model Review the current organisational structure Review and redesign generic Testing Structures Integration of nonstructural employees on approved structures Ensure that all stations have proper administrative support functions Secure funds for the restructuring process

July 2007 September 2007 December 2008

Ongoing process July 2007 July 2007 December 2007 December 2007

July 2007

402



Reduced lead time and increased income

• • •

• • • 2. To provide user friendly and customer orientated offices that provide quality services by 2009

• • • • •

Drive Thru's 1 - Eastern region 1 - Southern region Multi purpose centres Extend our services Provide professional service testing stations Implement 60% of the marketing plan for testing stations

• • • •

• •

Improve service through the principles of Batho Pele Review Customer Satisfaction Index Results Interventions to be implemented in line with results of a customer satisfaction survey Reduce turnaround times and queues Investigate electronic measures to establish customer survey Conduct an assessment on equipment needs to determine shortcomings Provide one-stop shops per region Establishment of Drive Thru's in Eastern and Southern regions Increase the number of satellite driving license renewal offices Align licensing with GDS 2025 programmes in terms of the establishment of multipurpose centres Investigate the integration of services in licensing e.g. SMS Change of physical

Ongoing process Monthly/Annually July 2007

Ongoing process December 2007

September 2007

June 2009 June 2008

July 2009

July 2009

June 2008 June 2008

403

• 3. To provide a safe and secure environment for staff, clients, stakeholders and council assets

• •

Security Audit report Safe and secure environment





• 4. To comply with all applicable legislative and policy framework in order to ensure good governance and effective administration



Service Level Agreement





80% detection rate of fraud and corruption Updated legislative and policy framework Safety cautious and prepared employees Create safe and secure environment Accountable administration High standard and quality of equipment



• • • • •

• •

infrastructure with respect to facility regulations Increase the number to service provided at the testing stations Conduct comprehensive audit of security systems/access control at all licensing offices to determine budget needs Provide security/access control for all licensing offices in line with the minimum security and emergency policy Ensure that all cashier cubicles are secure Common understanding of performance and service rendering To eradicate fraud and corruption with a 80% successful prosecution rate Ensure that quality control is implemented at all the stations Establish a strategic framework that conforms to the performance guidelines

December 2008

June 2007

July 2010

July 2009

June 2007 Ongoing process

Ongoing process July 2007

404

• • • •

Accountable administration High standard and quality of equipment Accountable administration High standard and quality of equipment

• • • •

• •



5. To create awareness of all legislation and the conditions of service to our employees and the public so that they know their rights, obligations and responsibility



Informed employees, clients and stakeholders

• • •

Compliance of the Best Practice Model and relative legislation Implement Disaster Management Plan Conduct an audit on security and access control Conduct an investigation of new software development of our current financial systems Compliance with the relevant standards of the SABS Compliance of the Quality Insurance and relevant legislation at the Testing Stations Compliance with the minimum requirements of the Driving license testing centres

Ongoing process

Avail legislation to employees Involve all stakeholders i.e. Labour Facilitate internal training sessions (skills specific and generic training intervention) in consultation with Education and Training

June 2007

June 2007 June 2007 July 2008

June 2007

Ongoing process

Ongoing process

June 2008 July 2007

405

• •

6. To create an environment without risk to safety and health of employees, clients and all other stakeholders

• • •

Safety Committees Assessment reporting Protected employees/staff



• • • • • • •



Public participation with respect to legislative environment Monitor and evaluate compliance of applicable legislation and conditions of service

September 2007

Effect equitable statutory appointments in terms of the OHS Act 85 of 1993 Establish safety committees Conduct a hazard identification and risk assessment Provide the necessary Personal Protective Equipment and clothing Effect necessary demarcation Conduct baseline hearing tests Maintain the Disaster management plan Conduct Risk and Vulnerability Assessment at all stations Monitor and Evaluate the risk to safety and health of licensing employees

November 2007

Ongoing process

November 2007 November 2007

Ongoing process

Ongoing process August 2007

Ongoing process

406

7. To equip employees with required skills necessary to provide a professional service and to cater for career path planning of 50% per annum

• • • • • •

List of competent training providers Effective and efficient service delivery Workplace Skills Forum Selected training for selected employees Extend services Improve training and development plan

• •

• • • • •

8. To introduce new convenient methods of payments by introducing debit cards and accounts for corporate clients by June 2009

• • • •

9. To ensure good governance and accountable administration within the

• •

Written consent from MEC Increase income and convenient service to clients Increase time saving payment services to clients Investigation and budgeting for alternative methods of payment Licensing Smart Card



Disciplined and motivated staff Clean administration

• •

• •

Identify training service providers Departmental training budget to be spent in accordance with the Workplace Skills Plan Investigate internal and external training programmes Engage training service providers in terms of training programmes Engage labour to develop Workplace Skills Forum Identify employees for training Implement the learnership programme

June 2007

Obtain approval from the MEC for the introduction of debit card payments in EMM Investigate the payment methods of accounts for corporate clients Obtain approval from council for the implementation of debit cards and account system payments Unscheduled auditing Full implementation of

November 2008

July 2008

June 2007 June 2007 June 2007 July 2007 September 2007

July 2008 October 2008

Ongoing process Ongoing process

407

licensing environment by introducing anti-corruption measures by June 2007



Safe and secured environment • • • • • •

10. To create HIV/AIDS awareness, education and assistance to the employees and the members of the public to curb the spread thereof by June 2007

• • • • •

Improved health of employees Stigma free environment Prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS Attendance of HIV/AIDS workshops Employee well-being programmes for licensing officials

• • •

• •

the Best Practice Model and application of relevant legislation Engage unions Training and re-training of staff Involve members of the public in the fight against crime Disciplinary actions in terms of the conditions of service Participation in legislative reform Implement the necessary technology i.e. CCTC Awareness displays Strategically placed containers with condoms at all stations Discussions once a month with EAP wellbeing to encourage HIV/AIDS testing and approved training Refer employees to EAP wellbeing for preand post-counselling Encourage affected employees and their families to participate in HIV/AIDS care group run by EAP wellbeing

Ongoing process Ongoing process July 2007 Ongoing process

Ongoing process July 2008

September 2007 July 2007

Ongoing process

Ongoing process September 2007

408

7.3.5

FOCUS AREA 18: SPORT, RECREATION ARTS AND CULTURE EMM GDS Focus Area

Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned Backlog Figures

Planned improvements in Service

INEQUITABLE, POORLY-MAINTAINED SPORTS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES • Library and Information Services - Construction of new, and refurbishment of existing, library facilities - Socio-economic development, focus on skills development • Arts and Culture - Lack of clear identity (arts and culture programmes) - Socio–economic focus on skills development and development of craft industries. Sport Recreation Arts and Culture Ekurhuleni to have world-class sports and recreational facilities Integration of Communities The Department contributes to the development and empowerment of the community through the provision of excellent services and facilities in the following: o Arts, Culture and Heritage o Library and Information Services o Sport and Recreation Community of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality: • Develop and improve service delivery standards towards comparable international standards o Libraries 16 o Arts and Culture 90% o Sport & Recreation 60% The Strategic Framework for Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture facilities to the community of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality indicates the following targets: • Provide additional SRAC facilities to obtain equity and transformation • Upgrade and maintain existing SRAC facilities • Transformation of library media collections to reflect SA society in context • Establish library community participation structures • Promote social development of the community through the provisioning of skills development programmes, inclusive of business, craft, civic and cognitive development programmes • Establish virtual libraries to meet information needs

409

Libraries Strategic Objectives To provide new library facilities and to restore existing facilities to acceptable standards in order to support and develop a culture of reading, provide access to educational, informational and recreational resources

Key Performance Indicators New Library and information service points constructed: • Olifantsfontein Library • Vosloorus Library • Langaville Library • Brakpan Library • Barcelona Library • Kingsway Library • Cloverdene Library • Winnie Mandela Library

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Olifantsfontein Library constructed and implemented Construction Planning and purchasing of additional media Planning of ICT, furniture and equipment Equip and implement • •

Completed design for Langaville and Vosloorus Libraries Purchased building for Brakpan Library

Annual Targets + Deadlines December 2008

February 2008

June 2008 •

Upgraded Tembisa Main, Daveyton, Duduza, HP Makoka, KwaThema,Tsakane and Wattville Libraries

June 2007



Upgraded Boksburg and Edenvale Libraries

June 2008



Upgraded and extended Isaac Mokoena and Tembisa Libraries

June 2010

410

Libraries…. Continued Strategic Objectives Transformation and development of library media resources and access to information to reflect the SA society in context

Key Performance Indicators Improve media collections in 10 of the top 20 townships Wide spectrum of media reflecting the works of indigenous authors and topics that reflect SA society at large

Measurable Performance targets / Actions % of allocated money spent

Annual Targets + Deadlines June 2007

Purchase in terms of profiles Process Purchase in terms of profiles and process June 2007/ June 2010

Sufficient study and reference, access to reference and lifelong learning resources Number of libraries equipped to provide access to technology Number of new electronic information resources introduced

June 2007/June 2009

Access to Government Information Corners in electronic and other relevant media formats

Number of Government Information Corners established

Skills development programmes presented at libraries to increase skills in the community Including the following categories: business, craft and cognitive development programmes

50 skills development programmes presented in the following categories: craft, business and cognitive Annual increase of 10%

6 x June 2007 15 x June 2008 22 x June 2009 Ongoing

Provision of access to 1 new electronic information resource Sufficient access for the public to technology in the top 20 townships

To promote socio-economic development of the EMM community through the presentation of skills development programmes, thereby contributing to enhanced quality of life

Identify themes Plan, develop and roll out programmes Monitor and evaluate

411

Libraries…. Continued Strategic Objectives Create structures that will enable the community to participate in the planning and running of the affairs of their library

Key Performance Indicators Cluster/library participation forums established Library Community Participation Guideline document implemented in every library

Annual Targets + Deadlines June 2007

Plan structures Identify stakeholders Arrange meetings Election of members Implement committees Reading programme concept and plan Expanded media collections Sustained reading programme implemented Competition winners Research, investigate and plan

June 2007

Automated circulation service and improved information and other services

Research investigate and plan

June 2007

Key Performance Indicators a. The Declaration of Heritage Sites

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Nimber of heritage sites identified and declared : Chris Hani and Thomas Nkombi identified. Subject to SAHRA approval.

Annual Targets + Deadlines 30 June 2007 – 2008

b. The preservation of Heritage Sites and Heritage Collections.

Number of Hostels and Mining Structures or part thereof preserved. Number of Heritage Trails preserved and identified

30 June 2008- 2010

Attract people to libraries and their services so that a culture of reading is developed, enhanced and maintained

Strongest Link Reading programme and annual competition implemented and sustained

Enhance access to library and information services through the development of virtual libraries Promote service delivery standards through the implementation of automated library service points, re-skilling of staff to provide improved personal service delivery

Virtual library service

Arts and Culture Strategic Objectives 1. To Develop and Empower the community through management and conservation of EMM Heritage

Measurable Performance targets / Actions 5 Cluster/ library participation forums established

2006-2010

30 June 2008-2010

412

c. Increase the usage of local names of cultural significance d. To increase the local knowledge that is important to a cultural society

2. To ensure community empowerment by increasing community interest and participation by presenting high impact cultural enrichment programmes

e. To increase multilinguism in the community a. To present high impact cultural enrichment programmes

b. Development of in-house (production house) Theatre Productions

3. To ensure accessibility, participation and awareness by developing new Arts Culture and Heritage Facilities

c. To present high impact cultural theatre programmes a. To develop new Arts Culture and Heritage Facilities

b. To develop new heritage facilities

Number of Art Collections maintained and preserved Number of facilities, sites, collections named or re-named Number of IKS ( Indigenous Knowledge Systems ) programmes implemented Number of History Workshops initiated Number languages promoted Number of cultural enrichment programmes presented to create awareness Number of popular productions presented at the Springs Civic Theatre Number of educational and skills development programmes initiated Number of Arts Culture and Heritage Forums established Number of Arts and Culture Data Bases developed Number of partnerships identified with accredited organisations for the development of a professional theatre production Number of community theatre activities presented Number of Art Centres developed in : • Oliver Tambo Cultural Precinct • Thami Mnyele Cultural Park Number of equitable maintained Arts and Culture Facilities: Roll out plan for 3 x Art Centres to be on the same standard Number of World Class Arts and Culture Facilities developed Number of Heritage Centres developed: • OR Tambo Narrative Centre in Oliver Tambo Cultural Precinct

30 June 2008 -2010 30 June 2008- 2010 30 June 2007-2008 30 June 2007 - 2010 30 June 2007-2010 30 June 2007-2010 30 June 2007 - 2010 30 June 2007-2010 30 June 2007 – 2010 30 June 2007 - 2010 30 June 2007-2010

30 June 2007 - 2010 30 June 2007- 2020

30 June 2007-2010

30 June 2008 - 2020 30 June 2008- 2020

413

4. To ensure accessibility, participation and awareness by upgrading existing Arts Culture and Heritage facilities

a. To increase the usage and accessibility of Arts Culture and Heritage Facilities

b. To identify and upgrade unused buildings that can be developed into Arts Culture and Heritage Facilities c. To identify and convert existing Recreation Halls into suitable performing arts venues

Sport and Recreation Key Performance Indicators • Accessible, user-friendly and affordable facilities for all communities. • • • • •

Construction and upgrading of multi-purpose sport and recreation facilities. Informal soccer fields developed and formalised. Informal soccer fields properly upgraded and maintained. Sport facilities upgraded and properly maintained Recreational facilities upgraded and maintained according to Norms and

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Converting all existing facilities to be accessible to all communities, including the disabled. • Multi-purpose sport and recreation facilities constructed and upgraded in identified and agreed-upon areas. •



• • •

Informal soccer fields developed, formalised and upgraded as agreed with the relevant sports bodies and communities. Completed upgrading as per approved project plans. Properly maintained facilities. Facilities upgraded and maintained as per Norms and Standards

Number of Cultural Precincts Developed: • Oliver Tambo Cultural Precinct • Thami Mnyele Cultural Park Number of Arts Culture and Heritage Facilities upgraded: • Benoni Museum • Katlehong Art Centre • Tsepo Art Centre • Post Office Theatre • Springs Civic Theatre Number of unused buildings identified

30 June 2008 - 2020

30 June 2008 - 2010

30 June 2008

Number of recreation halls per locality converted annually into suitable performing arts venues: Thokoza Auditorium

30 June 2007- 2008

Annual Targets + Deadlines 2 per region/ annum

Annual Targets + Deadlines 2 per region/ annum

As per project plans30 June 2009

As per project plans30 June 2009

2 fields per region/ annum

2 fields per region/ annum

30 June 2008

30 June 2008

Annually 3 facilities per region/ annum

Annually 3 facilities per region/ annum

414



• •





Standards. Establish Sport and Recreation Forums

All sport and recreation programmes aligned to provincial and national priorities. All programmes accessible to all communities.

Key Performance Indicators Facilities developed and upgraded to host national and international events, e.g., 2010 Soccer World Cup

Sport and Recreation facilities developed in areas with no facilities



Regional Sport and Recreation Forums established • Ekurhuleni Sports and Recreation Councils formalised and operational. • Flagship Sports Programmes o Youth Golf Development o Rugby Development League o Ekurhuleni Games o Ekurhuleni Half Marathon o Ekurhuleni Mayoral Soccer Challenge o OR Tambo Youth Games o Ekurhuleni Achievers Awards Establishment of sport academy • Flagship Recreational Programmes o Learn to Swim o Ekurhuleni Stadium Golf o Kiddies Olympics o Masakhane Games o Indigenous Games o Mass Participation Measurable Performance targets / Actions • World Cup Development Plan completed • Facilities upgraded to ensure compliance with FIFA LIST OF REQUIREMENTS: o Makhulong Stadium o Germiston Stadium o Vosloorus Stadium o Katlehong Stadium o Sinaba Stadium • Areas with no facilities identified and prioritised • Plan for the development of facilities completed

June 2007

June 2007

30 December 2007

30 December 2007

Annually

Annually

Annual Targets + Deadlines 30 January 2006

Annual Targets + Deadlines 30 January 2006

30 June 2009

30 June 2009

30 April 2007

30 April 2007

31 July 2007

31 July 2007

415



Internal and External funding for development of facilities sourced and secured.

• • • •



Legislative compliance with respect to: o White Paper Sport and Recreation o Safety at Sports and Recreational Events Bill o Norms and standards for recreation facilities. o Transformation in Sport

• • • • •



Agreement on standards of facilities: o Local o Provincial o National



Facilities developed and maintained. Funding approved as per project plans. Funding utilised effectively and efficiently. Proper reporting and accountability for secured funding.

31 July 2008- 30 June 2011 30 June 2006 – 30 June 2010

31 July 2008- 30 June 2011 30 June 2006 – 30 June 2010

Sport and Recreation policy developed and implemented in accordance with relevant legislation and national policies. Facilities upgraded in accordance with relevant legislation and policies. Employees and management trained in accordance with relevant legislation and policies. Policy on fundraising developed in line with relevant financial legislation. Norms and standards developed.

30 June 2007

30 June 2007

30 June 2008/ Continuous

30 June 2008/ Continuous

30 November 2007

30 November 2007

30 June 2007

30 June 2007

30 June 2006 Annually

30 June 2006 Annually

One international standard facility per sporting code by 2025.

416

CHAPTER 8:

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Introduction Chapter 7 dealt with Three National KPA’s and the linkage of the EMM GDS 2025 through Departmental Plans to support it. This chapter deals with the support in terms of Municipal Transformation and Institutional Development of the organisation in support of the objectives set in Chapter 7. Specific strategic objectves, key performance indicators, measurable performance targets and annual targets and deadlines are set for this purpose . To be able to deliver on these targets , there must be sufficient support to the organisation in the form of administrative, financial, human resource and other support. In the GDS certain principles for these support requirements has been laid down. This is further broken down in the relevant departments that are responsible for implementation of these principles in terms of the format mentioned. The following tables reflect the specific Strategic Objectives, KPI’s, Measurable Performance Targets/ Actions and Annual Targets and Deadlines. 8.1

CORPORATE AND LEGAL SERVICES EMM GDS Focus Area

Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

TO PROVIDE PROACTIVE, PROFESSIONAL AND RESPONSIVE CORPORATE AND LEGAL SUPPORT SERVICES IN SUPPORT OF THE STRATEGIC PRIORITY OF PROMOTING GOOD GOVERNANCE AS FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE KEY FOCUS AREAS OF THE GDS 2025 Corporate and Legal Services: Properties and Estate To render an effective and efficient Property and Estate Service The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and all its structures in general as well as applicants from the general public High level Delays in finalising applications Improve turnaround times

417

Strategic Objectives 1. Policy Administration. Application of Policy on Alienation and Purchasing of Land and Lease of Land. General Property Administration.

2. Management of Council Property Portfolio

Key Performance Indicators • • • • • • •

Implement policy in respect of property. Obtain comments from departments. Drafting of reports. Registration of property. Transfer of land. Drafting of Agreements or Deeds of Sale. Adjust Policy to comply with legislative amendments

• Compile and maintain a Property Register.

• • • • • • •

• • • 3. Administration of Security enclosures.

• Manage and process applications and renewals. • Ensure compliance with Policy and legal requirements. • Adjust and amend Policy as and when required

• • • • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions According to set time limits. Introduce and implement response times for various categories of transactions. Monitor on ongoing basis. Circulate applications for comments Obtain Corp Affairs approval Feedback from departments on their non compliance with timeframes. Compile and maintain Property Register annually and align with the asset section of the Finance Department and Infrastructure Services Department to check for maintenance requirements. Include Council buildings and vacant land in Property Register. Implement Property Management System. Implement Lease Contract Management System Manage all applications and ensure compliance with Policy and legislation Check applications to meet requirements for principle approval. Maintain register of approved applications. Manage approved applications and renewals. Manage process up to final approval where there are objections.

Annual Targets + Deadlines • Ongoing basis • Complied with • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • 100% updated per quarter

• As acquired • December 2007 • December 2007 • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis

418

Strategic Objectives 4. Township and Town Planning

EMM GDS Focus Area

Key Performance Indicators • Implement agreed limited administration in respect of Town Planning and Town Planning function

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Liaise and agree with Town Planning

Annual Targets + Deadlines • 100% per quarter as per agreement with town planning

Service Delivery Department

TO PROVIDE PROACTIVE, PROFESSIONAL AND RESPONSIVE CORPORATE AND LEGAL SUPPORT SERVICES IN SUPPORT OF THE STRATEGIC PRIORITY OF PROMOTING GOOD GOVERNANCE AS FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE KEY FOCUS AREAS OF THE GDS 2025. Corporate and Legal Services: Legal Advice and Administration

Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

To render an effective and efficient Legal Service The Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and all its structures in general High level Delays in rendering comments Improved response times

Strategic Objectives 1. Compile and maintain a Municipal Code.

Key Performance Indicators • Refinement of By-Laws to meet needs as may arise. • Checking of draft departmental By-Laws and ensuring legislative compliance in conjunction with the section General Administration • Drafting new By-Laws or amendments • Provide format for By-laws to Departments

• • •

• • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Approval of amendments by Council as required. Adherence to requirements to be met and procedure to be followed when drafting By-laws. Departmental submissions to be prioritised and scrutinised within set limits of receipt (i.e. Vetting and editing from a legal perspective). Review of Municipal Code in terms of legislation. Report to Council to approve own Department’s By-laws (amendments). Checking and vetting of other department’s By-laws as and when required.

Annual Targets + Deadlines • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis. •

Ongoing basis

• Within two years after an election and as required thereafter • Ongoing basis

419

Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Work shopping of by-laws or amendments as required.

Annual Targets + Deadlines • Ongoing basis •

2. Dealing with new legislation. To be informed and to inform Council of new legislation applicable to local government.

• To interpret, to implement and to hold • information sessions on new legislation. • To comment on draft legislation. • • • •

3. Dealing with claims against Council. • To deal with claims by and against the Council. • To deal with claims by Council against other parties.

• • • • • • • •

To do presentations on new legislation as required.

Ongoing basis

• As required – 100% compliance per quarter • Ongoing basis

To comment on draft legislation as published or received through GALA or SALGA. To refer new legislation to relevant Departments for implementation. Government Gazettes to be perused on regular basis to check for new legislation or draft legislation. On-line legal updates. To have claim investigated. To deny or accede to claim. To refer claim to insurers. To instruct legal counsel to defend claim or to lodge a claim. To conduct claims against other parties within prescribed Court periods/rules. To deal with claims by or against the Council in the appropriate manner within the prescribed court periods. Vibrant roster of instructions to attorneys to be maintained. To report to Council on claims

• Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis

• • • • •

Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis

• Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis

420

Strategic Objectives

4. Provide legal advice/actions.

5. Compliance with legislation.

6

Legal Administration on Property matters.

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions by/against Council

• To investigate matters referred for legal advice. • To advise on legal implications and best manner to deal with such matters and other actions. • To comment on proposed delegation of powers to ensure compliance to legislative requirements



• To peruse legislation. • To advise relevant functionaries of appropriate legislative requirements. • To submit report to appropriate structure on compliance.



• Rendering legal opinion on Property matters. • Institute / recommend legal actions. • Draft tender/or documents for alienation of land. • Legal action in respect of Town Planning matters. • Finalising all legal matters in respect of Property matters. • Delegations in respect of Property



• • •

• •



Annual Targets + Deadlines • Six monthly

• Quarterly To investigate matters and offer legal • 100% compliance per advice within set time limits. quarter to standard of 10 working days after To address legal advice requests or receipt. actions within given time limits as and when required. • Ongoing basis Advise Departments on legislative framework and requirements on an ongoing basis as required. • Ongoing basis To comment on all amendments to the system of Delegations within the set time limits. To peruse and advise as per the KPIs • Ongoing basis within set time limits. To peruse, advise or report within the • Ongoing basis given timeframes as and when appropriate. Workshops for other departments to • Ongoing basis raise awareness in respect of new laws. To be finalised within set time limits. • 100% compliance per quarter to set time frames Monitor. • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis

421

Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

matters. 7.

Deal with Litigation and Court Processes.

• To defend or otherwise address court actions (i.e. motions, interdicts, etc) against Council. • To lodge appropriate court actions or processes to uphold Council’s rights or interests. • Deal with all relevant labour-related cases

• •



• •

8.

Conduct research into the law.

• Establish a unit to conduct such research. • Conduct research into the law to inform the decision-making processes of Council.

Annual Targets + Deadlines • Ongoing basis

To defend or lodge such • actions/processes within legal timeframes. To achieve the optimal rate of • success when pursuing cases where success appears slight or questionable. To undertake such defence or action • within the given court time limits, taking into account the degree of complexity thereof. To pursue settlement of appropriate • cases before matters are set down for hearing to minimise costs. Address the notice to Council of all relevant labour-related cases either • too late or resulting in awards by default.

• To establish such unit. Subsequent to the establishment of such a unit: • To conduct research into legislation, court decisions, legal publications on an ongoing basis. • To advise functionaries or structures accordingly as may be appropriate within set time limits. • To resource the unit to be able to perform this function by subscribing to the appropriate publications, systems / seminars /

Ongoing basis

Ongoing basis

Ongoing basis

Ongoing basis

Once a year

• Within 4 months after provision of funds. • Within 4 months after provision of funds. • Within 4 months after provision of funds. •

Within 4 months after provision of funds.

422

Strategic Objectives

9.

Contracts

Key Performance Indicators

• To draft contracts on behalf of Council. • To comment on contracts intended to bind Council and other parties. • Attend to Standard Services Agreements and other Town Planning-related agreements

• • • •

10. Intellectual Property Protection.

• To protect the Council’s intellectual property rights in work done for or by Council in appropriate cases (i.e. in tender documents, appointment of consultants, etc.)

• • • •

11. Skill and Resource Audit of Legal Services

• To identify the training of staff needs, the resources and new policies and procedures required to be able to perform the legal functions in conjunction with General Administration and Support

• •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions training etc. • To advise structures of Council by means of reports / memoranda / information sessions within given timeframes. To draft various pro forma contracts for broader use in Council as may be required. To draft specific contracts as may be required within set time limits. To draft contracts or comment thereof as and when required within given timeframes. Electronic contracts to be utilised to extent possible or appropriate. To apply the provision included in tender documents to protect Council’s intellectual property rights. To apply the provision included in letters of appointment of consultants in the same regard. To ensure inclusion of the relevant provision in applicable tender documents on an ongoing basis. To apply the stated provision included in the pro forma letters of appointment of consultants. Once staff have been placed, do an audit of skill and resources available and required to perform functions. Consult with HR Department on training needs of staff and develop an

Annual Targets + Deadlines • Within 4 months after provision of funds.

• Ongoing as requested • Ongoing as requested • Ongoing as requested • Ongoing as requested

• As required

• As required • As required • As required • Within 2 months after placement • Within 1 year after the

423

Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions implementation plan to be included in the Departmental Skills Plan

Services

EMM GDS Focus Area

Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service Strategic Objectives 1. Registry services

Annual Targets + Deadlines audit

TO PROVIDE PROACTIVE, PROFESSIONAL AND RESPONSIVE CORPORATE AND LEGAL SUPPORT SERVICES IN SUPPORT OF THE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES OF PROMOTING GOOD GOVERNANCE AS FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE KEY FOCUS AREAS OF THE GDS 2025 Corporate and Legal Services: General Administration and Support Services To render an effective and efficient General Administration and Support Service The Department Corporate and Legal Services specifically, and the EMM and all its structures in general High level None Expansion of electronic archiving management system Key Performance Indicators • Record incoming mail within set time limits and file correspondence correctly; • Distribute mail within set time limits • Implement National Archive approved File Plan; • Develop and implement safekeeping facilities.

• • • • • • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Records service. Archive Service in terms of the approved file plan. Registration of all incoming mail. Implementation of National Archive approved filing system at HO and decentralised levels. Establishment of internal dispatch system to all departments, Councillors, regional and CCC offices. Implement electronic records management system. Safekeeping facilities for Council agreements / contracts / Declarations of financial interest / Minutes of Committees of Council.



Annual Targets + Deadlines 100% compliance per quarter to the Archive legal requirements Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



424

Strategic Objectives 2. Dispatch

Key Performance Indicators • Develop and implement an internal dispatch system. • To deliver agendas and minutes timeously to all participants

• • • • •

3. Financial services

4. Support Services

• Financial control, and provision and availability of resources.



• Develop and maintain Departmental SDBIP

• • •

• Departmental fleet and Asset Management



• • • • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Group and pack together for CCC messengers. Arrange pickup by CCC messengers. Hand over to messengers and obtain signatures. Ensure that all control sheets are received back from messengers. Verify and update correctness of delivery addresses and correct as and when required. Expenditure and financial control.



Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



100% compliance in terms of the monthly reports – one report per month Annually Monthly and ongoing Annually

Compilation of annual budget. Budget Management Compilation of five year operational budget. Assets management

• • •

Insurance of Department assets. Department Fleet management Electronic assets register for Department. Upgraded fleet management Compilation of five year capital budget

• • •

Annually and ongoing – 100% compliance to the EMM Assets Management Policy per quarter Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis

• •

Ongoing basis Annually and ongoing



425

Strategic Objectives 5. Procurement

Key Performance Indicators • Procurement and Contract management of services and equipment within the department.

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Procurement in terms of the Policy • Monitor agreements in respect of services provided. • Monitor agreements in respect of equipment

• •

Annual Targets + Deadlines Annually Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis

426

Strategic Objectives 6. General Administration

Key Performance Indicators • Provide services to deal with and manage general administration activities / matters.

• • • • • •

• Annual Grants-in-Aid • Promulgation of By-laws and Tariffs approved by Council in terms of latest legislation. • Co-ordinate and develop Departmental IDP. • Develop and maintain Delegation of Powers.

• Administer compliance with the Access to Information Act.

• • • • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Effective responding to general unallocated correspondence. General administration management. Dealing with general correspondence. Facilitate access to policies, tariffs, by-laws, etc. to management and general public. Implementation and maintenance of leave register. Compile and upkeep of electronic registers on all EMM by-laws, tariffs, delegated powers, policies and departmental knowledge management system. Deal with the annual grants-in-aid in terms of the policy Compliance with legal requirements and updating of information on intraand internet registers Annual update and, if required, review of departmental IDP Development and upkeep of register with approved delegated powers Administrative compliance with submitting annual reports, develop and upkeep of manual, collating and responding to applications in terms of the Act.



Annual Targets + Deadlines Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



As requested



Ongoing basis



100% up to date per quarter within 15 days from promulgation / approval



Ongoing basis



As required



Annually



Ongoing basis with a total review after each general municipal election Annually and ongoing



427

Strategic Objectives 7. Maintenance of relevant departmental offices and identified Council facilities (ie. New Council Chamber)

Key Performance Indicators • Ensure maintenance and management of stated facilities and services.

• • • •

8. Departmental Human Resources Management

9. Departmental Employee well-being Programmes 10. Employment Equity and Workplace Skills Plan

• To identify the skills available, training needs and resource needs within the Department.

• •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Office space. Tea Service. Allocation of parking where applicable. Cleaning and maintenance of departmental buildings and facilities where applicable. Identify the skills and training needs within set time limits and monitor implementation. Programme and budget for training and resources to address the Department’s needs timeously each year. As rollout to different levels takes place, to develop and implement performance system Ensure filling of funded vacancies and upkeep of staff information on PEELOW system re: appointments, resignations, designations, funding, transfers, etc.

• • •

Annual Targets + Deadlines As required Ongoing basis Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



6 monthly



Annually



Annually



Ongoing basis

• Develop Performance Agreements to all approved levels of employees in Department • To control and manage departmental staff movements



• To identify employee well-being needs (HIV/AIDS, Occupational Health and Safety) and render support. • To develop an Employment Equity Plan and Workplace Skills Plan



Programme and budget for training and awareness.



Annually and when required



Maintains the Departmental Employment Equity Plan Maintains the Departmental Workplace Skills Plan. Co-ordinates training



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



• •

428

EMM GDS Focus Area

Service Delivery Department

TO PROVIDE PROACTIVE, PROFESSIONAL AND RESPONSIVE CORPORATE AND LEGAL SERVICES IN SUPPORT OF THE STRATEGIC PRIORITY OF PROMOTING GOOD GOVERNANCE AS FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE KEY FOCUS AREAS OF THE GDS 2025 Corporate and Legal Services: Committee and Secretariat Support Services

Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

To render an effective and efficient Committee and Secretariat Service All Councillor and Councillor structures within the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality High level None Control over the turnaround time of items

Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

1. To manage the committee and • Comply with approved policy and • secretariat services procedure • • • • 2. Compilation of agendas for all • Compile for timeous distribution. meetings of council and committees

• • • • • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Ensure time limits in terms of approved guidelines are met. Limit mistakes. Monitor on ongoing basis. Identify lack of skills, capacity and technological resources. Address and implement corrective steps. Ensure deadlines are kept. Monitor quality control in process on ongoing basis. Check quality & format of reports received. (Spelling, Language, Typing). Draft agenda, proofread, type final agenda and submit to printing section. Follow up on printing and distribution. Refer to next level of decisionmaking after meeting

Annual Targets + Deadlines •

Ongoing basis

• • •

Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis for each of the scheduled 11 Council and 22 Mayoral Committee Meetings (1 & 2)



Ongoing basis

429

3. To arrange all meetings in 2.

• Smooth running of all meetings and • compliance with meeting procedures. •

Monitor on ongoing basis. • Confirm meeting dates for calendar years with the committee. Book meeting venues for whole • calendar year in advance. Confirm availability of venue and required equipment when compiling • the agenda for each meeting. Confirm arrangements for equipment at least 1 hour before meeting. •

Ongoing basis for each of the scheduled 11 Council and 22 Mayoral Committee meetings Ongoing basis



Complete and have available for • reference.

• •

Limit mistakes and monitor. Prepare to attend meeting by studying the agenda and making notes for draft minutes before meeting. Attend meeting and record proceedings. Write down amendments to recommendations, listen to tape or check with Executive Director as soon as possible after meeting. Type draft minutes. Check and correct minutes. Deliver final minutes to printing within deadlines. Ensure that Minutes are signed Hand over signed Minutes to Archives

• •

Within 48 hours of the scheduled 11 Council and 22 Mayoral Committee meetings Ongoing basis Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis

• • •

Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis

• •

Monthly Monthly

• • •

4. To produce minutes of all meetings • Timeous completion and limit errors. in 2.

• •

• • • • •

Ongoing basis

Ongoing basis

430

5. To print required copies of agenda • Timeous completion and limit errors. and minutes

• • • • • • •

6. To mark out and track the execution • Implement Resolution Tracking System • of all resolutions. and have available for all Departments • in respect of their own resolutions. •



EMM GDS Focus Area

Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned

Print required copies within set deadlines for timeous distribution. Receive all minutes and agendas for printing. Print one draft and check correctness of number sequence and colour separation of pages. Make corrections as required. Print final number of copies. Deliver to Archive section within deadlines. Obtain copies of control sheets to verify distribution Maintain System Have resolutions available on Resolution Tracking System (RTS).



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis

• • •

Ongoing basis Ongoing basis Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis once per month for 11 months for all Council and Mayoral Committee Meetings within time limits Ongoing basis

Include all resolutions that can be executed in terms of delegated • powers when compiling minutes after meeting, on RTS. Mark out resolutions for execution in own Department and follow up. •

Ongoing basis

TO PROVIDE PROACTIVE, PROFESSIONAL AND RESPONSIVE CORPORATE AND LEGAL SERVICES IN SUPPORT OF THE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES OF PROMOTING GOOD GOVERNANCE AND ENHANCING PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AS FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE KEY FOCUS AREAS OF THE GDS 2025 Corporate and Legal Services: PETITIONS, WARD COMMITTEE SERVICES, GENDER AND TARGETED GROUPS To render an effective and efficient Petitions, Ward Committee, Gender and Targeted Groups Service All Councillors and Council structures as well as Wards, Ward Committees and the Public in general within the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality High level

431

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives 1. Formulation of Policies and Procedures for Ward Committees (Rule).

None Streamlining of Ward Committee report back. Petition system to be refined. Key Performance Indicators • Adoption and maintenance of policies and procedures.

• • • •

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Target on adoption of policies and procedures met. Review of policies annually. Monitor and evaluate continuous implementation. Annual verification of compliance with legislation Filling of vacancies. Establishment of Ward Committees. Management of elections.

2. Facilitation of the electoral process of Ward Committees and establishment of Ward Committees.

• Election of 880 Ward Committee members. • Establishment of 88 Ward Committees.

• • •

3. Capacity building of Ward Committees.

• Induction. • Training. • Development of Ward Committees.

• Training dates to be determined.

4. Provision of logistic and administrative • Budget and staff planning and support service. administrative support service.

• Training to be conducted as identified. • Review and evaluation. • Utilisation of staff and budget • Placement of support staff members in terms of placement policy and approved structure within budgeted funding. • Utilisation of staff and budget. • Review.

Annual Targets + Deadlines • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Within set time limits • 100% established within set time limits • At the beginning of each term of office in terms of the Guidelines • At commencement of terms of office. • Ongoing basis • Annually • On continuous basis. • Ongoing basis

• On continuous basis. • Annually

432

5. Co-ordination of submission of reports and requisition of Ward Committees to Council.

6. Co-ordination of Petitions and Public Participation Functions

EMM GDS Focus Area

Service Delivery Department

Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service Strategic Objectives

• Auditing number of reports and requisitions of Ward Committees.

• Management of petitions received and mark out and follow up for action.

• Auditing and monitoring of ±88 reports. • Referring of Ward Committee minutes to relevant RED • Evaluate • Forward and monitor Ward needs and align with SDBIP/Portfolio • Submit quarterly reports to Corporate Affairs Committee, Mayoral Committee and the Council • Establishment of a Public Participation Committee (PPC) • Regulate convening of PPC

• Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis • Monthly • Monthly • One report per quarter • Ongoing basis • Ongoing basis

TO PROVIDE PROACTIVE, PROFESSIONAL AND RESPONSIVE CORPORATE AND LEGAL SERVICES IN SUPPORT OF THE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES OF PROMOTING GOOD GOVERNANCE AS FURTHER ENHANCED BY THE KEY FOCUS AREAS OF THE GDS 2025 Corporate and Legal Services: Councillor Support

To render an effective and efficient Councillor Support Administration / Service All Councillors and Councillor structures within the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality High level None Capacitating of Councillors to be planned / controlled Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

Annual Targets + Deadlines

433

Strategic Objectives 1. Registration of newly elected Councillors in respect of Pension Fund, Medical Aid, Cellular phones and Insurance Cover to the extent appropriate.

2. Office support systems infrastructure. 3. Catering and Travel.

4. Coordination of Councillors training and capacity training.

Key Performance Indicators • Number of Councillors elected and registered. • Number of Councillors to join Pension Fund and Medical Aid. • Process applications of Councillors to be supplied with cell phones. • Number of Councillors who have insurance. • Attend to infrastructure supply to office bearers. • Application of catering and travel policies and procedures, with specific reference to refreshments, travel, subsistence and divisional resources and equipment. • Skills audit and evaluation. • Training needs analysis.

Measurable Performance targets / Actions • Implement process. •

Implement process of registration.



Process all applications for benefits.

• • • •

Put infrastructure in place. Process staff placements. Apply and maintain. Implement, monitor and verify compliance with policy and procedure, as well as needs. Completion of skills and training needs audit and evaluation after elections. Refer training needs to Human Resources Department of relevant body. Implement training required for Councillors. Ensure provisioning and monitor in terms of the approved guidelines. Making of overseas travel arrangements. Certification of compliance. Updating overseas trips register. Management of travel agent function. Submit report to Province

• • •

5. Provisioning of MMCs offices 6. International Travel arrangements

• Provide refreshments, materials, stationery as budgeted for • Compliance with the MIR policy

• • • • • •

• •

Annual Targets + Deadlines Within 30 days after a general election and/or by-election Ongoing process after elections.



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis as per the need within the policy and budgetary framework Within 3 months after elections

• •

Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis



Ongoing basis

• • •

Ongoing basis Monthly Ongoing



Monthly

434

8.2

FINANCE Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives

GOOD GOVERNANCE Finance The provision of financial and valuation services in an accountable, effective and transparent manner, through service excellence with a cohesive and motivated team. Internal Customers • Council • Mayoral Committee • Top Management • Other Departments External Customers • National Departments • Provincial Departments • Other Organs of State • Business and Industry within Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality • Residents of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality Effective Financial Support Not Applicable Financial Support to Departments in respect of: • Budget Compilation • Budget Monitoring • Costing System • Attendance of Portfolio Committees • Processing of financial transactions • Procurement and Payments • Asset Management • Financial Advice Attend to standardisation (valuations) Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

Annual Targets + Deadlines

435

STRATEGIC ISSUES / CFO 1. Risk Management KPA: INCOME 1. Provide and Manage an efficient and effective Integrated Debtors Management System

2. Revenue Management

3. Customer Care



Risk Management Plan for the Finance Department

Plan implemented



Annually



Number of days from due date



10 days

June 2008 – 10 days June 2009 – 10 days June 2010 – 10 days



Consolidate and integrate billing system.



Complete standardisation

June 2008 – Standardise June 2009 – Consolidate



Data management



System to control data quality

June 2008 – Clean data & protect data June 2009 – Manage



Payment Levels



>95%

June 2008 – >95%



Improved Collection



Reduce debtors days



Number of paypoints



Strategy defined

June 2008 – Reduce by 10% June 2009 – Reduce by 10 % Add paypoints in terms of approved strategy and third party tender



Number of payment methods



7 methods

June 2008 – 7 methods



Response times



Reduce response times



Reduction of queries



Reduce queries

June 2008 – Reduce by 10% June 2009 – Reduce by 10% June 2008 – Reduce by

436

10% KPA: EXPENDITURE 1. Supply Chain Management

2. Provide and Manage an efficient and timeous Creditors Management System



Demand Management



Needs assessment





Stock Holding







Implementation of Policies





Central Procurement

• •



Promotion of acquisition from BEEs / SMMEs and Local EMM-based Companies Reduce clearance periods on creditor statements Timeous payment of creditors

Stock levels within predetermined minimum and maximum levels Report submissions as required by the S.C.M Regulations/Policy 100% Acquisitions from C.P.O Acquisitions from these categories against the total spend as per the set targets

Creditor statements cleared within 60 days Creditor payment effected within 30 days % of payment effected electronically 100% of payments from central database Establish a central payroll office 100% of reconciliation from central database



As per the set targets (30 June annually) Monthly



Monthly



2008 – >90%



30 Sept 2007

• •

30 Sept 2007 30 Sept 2007

Implementation and monitoring of the Asset Management Policy compliance



Quarterly report

• • •

3. Provide and Manage an accurate and Centralised Payroll System

KPA: FINANCIAL CONTROL 1. Manage assets and accounting of the EMM in an efficient and effective manner.

• •

Payment of stores creditors electronically Centralised payment of salaries Centralised Payroll Office



Centralised reconciliation of monthly returns



Compliance with the Asset Management Policy

• • • • • •



• • •

Proof thereof before quotation or BID process 30 June annually

As per the requirements of the Regulations 30 June 2008

437

2. Manage Insurance Portfolio of the EMM

3. Manage the treasury function of the EMM effectively and efficiently.

KPA: BUDGET AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 1. Compilation of a Multi-Year Budget

• •

Revise Insurance Portfolio Insurance risk management



Update and place insurance cover for the EMM Reduce insurance related risks by advising departments of risks identified and corrective measures based on the nature of their insurance claims and insurance risk assessments. Bank accounts reconciled monthly Cash Management Policy implemented.



Annually 30 June



On identification of insurance risks that require corrective actions from the department



25th Monthly



30 Sept. 2007



Daily and Monthly cash flow report.



Daily and on the 25th Monthly





Bank Reconciliations





Cash Management Policy





Daily and Monthly cash flow model



Investment Policy



Investments of all surplus funds.



Monthly Report



25th Monthly



Approved Documentation / Council Resolution



Completed Budget Documentation including Long Term Financing Strategy and resource allocation in terms of GDS focus areas Approved Capital Budget Approved Operating Budget Approved SDBIP Budget Information published in terms of MFMA Annual Financial Statements Consolidated Financial Statements Basic costing system on all



30 May annually

• • • •

30 June annually 30 June annually 30 June annually 15 July annually

• •

31 Aug annually 30 Sept annually



June 2008 – 95%

• • • • 2. Compilation of Annual Financial Statements



Letter of confirmation / acceptance by Auditor General

• •

3. Maintenance of Costing System



Spending level on internal charges



438

vote numbers

departmental repairs and maintenance and capital works undertaken Departmental charges (consumption) levied to correct vote numbers



June 2009 – 95%

• •

June 2008 – 100% June 2009 – 100%



Number of departmental accounts linked to correct vote numbers





Workplace Skills Plan (WSP)



Approved WSP



Council timeframes



Learnerships



Progamme implemented



June 2008



HIV/Aids information sessions/workshops



Two HIV/Aids information sessions/workshops



June 2008

KPA: FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES 1. Skills development

2. HIV/Aids KPA: VALUATIONS 1. To have all properties valued.

• Compilation & maintenance of Valuation Roll until 2008 • Constitute Valuation Board. • Secretariat functions to the Valuation Board. • Commissioning of ad-hoc valuations as and when required. • Implementation of the Municipal Property Rates Act.

• Establish a norm that is in accordance with prescribed legislation and Metro resolution every 2 years. • Supplementary Valuation Roll as and when necessary. • Valuation Roll to be revisited every 2 years. • Implement Valuation Board upon the Premier’s approval. • Valuate all properties. • Appoint a Municipal Valuer. • Set up and finalise a Corporate Valuations Department (Including a discussion where to place the function)

• 100% compliance per quarter to all actions required in maintaining the valuation roll • Bi-annual • As required • As required • September 2007 • 30 September 2007

439

8.3

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

KPA: EDUCATION TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT EMM GDS Focus Area Good Governance Service Delivery Department Human Resources Management and Development : KPA - Education, Training and Development Definition of Service To provide Human Resources (Education, Training and Development) support services to the customers (all departments within EMM and the members of the community) Definition of Customer All the recipients of all the services provided by Education, Training and Development. These customers are categorised as follows: • Departments and Employees • Residents of EMM • Councillors Service Level planned • Departments: Delivery of HRD interventions. Provide guidance and support in terms of HRD. • Residents of EMM Delivery of Community Development programmes. Provide learning opportunities and support to students and prospective students. • Councillors Delivery of HRD interventions. Enable Councillors to support community members in terms of HRD. Backlog • Integration of all training centres Planned improvements in Service • Engagement of a service provider to assist in developing QMS (guidelines & the actual system) • Improve quality of Workplace Skills Plan. • HRD Strategy (Structural change). • Establishment of Academy of Learning Strategic Objectives Research, develop and implement appropriate Human Resource Development (HRD) policies, systems and procedures

Key Performance Indicators Learner management system fully instituted and implemented. HRD systems and procedures fully integrated.

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Research, develop and implement 100 % of all appropriate HRD policies, systems and procedures.

Annual Targets + Deadlines 20 % achievement per annum. End June 2011

440

Manual of all finalised HRD policies available. Skills Development Legislation complied with and leveraged.

Letter of approval of WSP and Annual Training Report received.

Develop and submit Annual Workplace Skills Plan to LGSETA.

Annually

Skills programmes and learnership programmes for employees implemented.

Compile and Submit Annual Training Report to LGSETA.

Annually

60 % of Mandatory and Discretionary Grant claimed.

Receive 60 % of Mandatory Grant.

Annually

Departments are supported and guided to leverage skills development in their areas of operation

Capacitate Departments on skills development imperatives Assist Departments in ensuring that their WSPs are in line with the KPIs and are enabling officials to executive their functions.

End June 2009

Allocate officials to each Department to support, advise and guide them.

End June 2008

Select and accredit EMM sites as providers of training.

End June 2011

Accredit EMM as Investors in People organisation. Appoint service provider to assist in developing and piloting Quality Management System

End June 2009

Providers accreditation certificates obtained Investors in People Accreditation Certificate.

Research, develop and deploy a credible quality management system

QMS System is in place and operational.

December 2007

441

The development and Implementation of an effective community development programme to support the expanded public works programmes.

Bursary Strategy approved. Bursaries awarded to EMM students in respect of scarce skills. Partnership with business to assist in the awarding of bursaries and mentorship for the students. Programmes that are aimed at addressing the shortage of skills as per the requirements of JIPSA are implemented

Establish an Ekurhuleni Learning Academy to encompass and co-ordinate all HRD structures and activities

Learning academy established.

Conduct a workshop and information sessions to prepare the departments on the system Implement Bursary Strategy.

June 2008

July 2008

Award 100 Bursaries to needy students.

Annually

Implement additional 5 Learnership programmes. June 2007 Bursaries awarded in accordance with the technical areas prescribed by JIPSA programme

Identify and integrate all HRD activities and structures

June 2008

June 2010

Launch learning academy. Establish Learning Council.

KPA : EMPLOYEE WELL-BEING Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

GOOD GOVERNANCE Human Resource Management & Development – KPA : Employee Well-Being: Psychological Services To render efficient and where possible, pro-active, EAP services to all our customers All employees of the EMM (including their immediate family members). They can be categorised as: • Employees • Councillors • Immediate family members of employees/Councillors

442

Service Level planned

• • •

Management and supervisors Unions Business



Employees (basic level) • Substance Abuse • HIV/AIDS • Emotional • Family and Relationship • Financial • Interpersonal • Interpersonal Conflict • Work Performance • Psychiatric Referral • Medical/Incapacity • Criminal • Multiple • Developmental Management/Supervisors Developmental Absenteeism Control (Not collecting information, however, users of the information) N.A

• Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives



The Strategic Framework for Psychological Services: • To respond to any enquiry within 48 hours – Ongoing • To develop a toolkit and train Managers and Supervisors to be able to recognise problem behaviour pro-actively – December 2007 • Investigate and develop a system for Managers and Supervisors to do absenteeism control (in collaboration with Provisioning and Maintenance Division) – Dec 2008 • To strive to change the Psychological service from a re-active to a pro-active service – Jun 2007 Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

Annual Targets + Deadlines

443

Submission of reports for approval to Corporate affairs

Communicate decision to EMM.

December 2007 December 2008

Identify and agree on policies requiring development.

Submit 5 secondary policies for approval. Finalise all secondary policies.

December 2010

Training Statistics and Attendance records reflect attendance as a percentage of total number of psychologists, EAPs, administrative support staff and interns.

Source appropriate training interventions. Schedule training and conduct training.

Ongoing

Supervisors trained in EAP Policy and Procedure

Design relevant supervisor training objectives and course outlines.

EW Stakeholder committee is operational.

Identify key stakeholders to serve on committee. Formulate terms of reference for the committee Communicate term of reference to committee. Report and obtain approval

Consult all relevant stakeholders Submit policies to Corporate Affairs Committee or Council for approval. Implement new policies.

The development and deployment of a credible career development.

Supervisory training programme

Establishment of health and Well-Being Programmes.

Southern Region – 2008 Northern Region – 2008 Eastern Region – 2009 Corporate – 2009 Entire EMM - 2010 Establish Stakeholder Committee by December 2007

444

Scorecard trends are documented and implications determined.

Conduct 2 (two) surveys: • HIV & AIDS • Customer Care Survey

Identification of Service Provider – 31 July 2007 Conduct Survey – 30 Sept 2007

Analyse information to identify specific problems areas that could impact workplace performance & motivation.

Collate and analyse information – 31 October 2007 Draft report – 30 Nov 2007 December 2008

Where necessary, conduct further qualitative studies to determine any problem focus areas. Formulate action plans to address source of EW.

Number of Programmes implemented.

Implement action plans. Identify specific requirement of employee community.

Programmes have measurable impact on employee well-being and workplace performance.

Formulate programme Implement programmes

To provide specialised services

A fully operational centre is available

Determine location of centre. Determine centre requirements. Determine current practices. Establish physical assessment infrastructure requirements. Report and obtain approval and budget.

Continue with support groups for HIV/AIDS and substance abuse. – Ongoing Investigate establishment of other support groups. – Dec 2008

Ongoing

445

A detailed documented review of test batteries exists.

Report and obtain approval. Obtain new test and implement.

Ongoing Ongoing

Enhanced Assessment practices.

Determine where specific assessments could be used to enhance existing HR practices. Report and obtain approval. Implement and use test to optimise current processes. Determine current information storage requirements. Report and obtain approval Source relevant system from market. Optimise the use of PEELOW Determine specific current global best assessment practices. Proposed alternative assessment methodologies. Report and obtain approval Implement and align with human resource practices. Determine EMM requirements for intern recruits. Report and obtain approval Recruit intern psychologists. Select and appoint intern psychologist Evaluate performance of interns Determine HR practitioner requirements for EMM. Select high potential interns for formal appointment.

July 2010

Credible system implemented.

Documented research of cutting edge assessment methodologies.

Implement psychology internship program

Interns appointed.

Number of interns appointed.

July 2010

Dec 2007 Dec 2007 Dec 2007 Dec 2007 Dec 2008 Dec 2008 Dec 2008 Dec 2008 Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing July 2007 Dec 2007 Dec 2008

446

HIV/ AIDS Policy

Support provided to HIV/AIDS unit through counselling & establishment of a support group. KAP analysis.

Support the formulation, review or alignment of an effective HIV / AIDS policy with relevant Employee Well-Being practices. Analyse KAP survey results and where necessary focus

Continuous Ongoing Identification of Service Provider – 31 July 2007 Conduct survey – 30 Sept 2007 Collate and analyse information – 30 Oct 2007 Draft report – 30 Nov 2007

Growth + Development Strategic Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Planned & Outstanding services

GOOD GOVERNANCE HRM&D Department: KPA: Employee Well-Being Division: OH&S Section Conduct risk measurement to quantify chemical, biological and ergonomic hazards, recommend corrective measures and monitor the implementation of corrective measures. • • • •

All employees Contractors Other stakeholders EMM departments • • • • • • •

Risk measurement Safety audits Routine inspections OHS Training e.g SHE Representative, First Aid, HIRA and Basic Fire Training Baseline Hearing Screening Test Legal Appointments Safety committee meetings o

Comprehensive baseline Risk Assessment

447

o o o o o

Diagnostic testing of referral cases Baseline screening of employees exposed to noise higher than 85 Decibels Noise Survey (phase three) Hepatitis B employee immunisation Pre-medical examination of new, and general medical examination of existing, exposed employees.

o The strategic framework for OH&S Section indicates the following targets: o Conduct risk measurement - target date - 2008 o Review risk assessment programme periodically - target date – 2009 o Develop and implement contractor management programme - target date – 2010 o Conduct noise survey (phase three) - target date – 2010 o Conduct baseline screening to exposed employees - target date – 2009 o Refer screened employees for diagnostic testing – target date – 2008 o Develop and implement Hepatitis B employee immunisation programme - target date - 2010 Planned improvements in Service The Strategic Framework for OH&S Section indicates the following targets: • Conduct risk measurement – target date – Jun 2008 • Review risk assessment programme periodically – target date – 2010 • Develop and implement contractor management programme – target date - 2010 Strategic Objectives Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Actions Deadlines Research, develop and Implement OH&S Submission of reports for approval to Revise policies and submit for approval. Ongoing Policies Corporate Affairs Submit proposals of policies for council resolutions. Ongoing Key policies requiring development have been agreed Communicate decision to EMM. July 2007 Consult all relevant stakeholders Backlog Figures

Submit policies to Corporate Affairs Committee or Council for approval.

Identify and agree on policies requiring development. e.g. PPE Implement new policies

Ongoing December 2008

448

Letters of appointment issued Compliance with all Legislative requirements related to OHS.

To create and maintain a safe and healthy environment for all employees and other stakeholders.

Readily available health and safety information.

Finalise all occupational health statutory appointments Standardise all OHS documents put on Intranet

Accessible relevant health and safety information.

Conduct information survey to all departments with regard to OHS documents. Provide compulsory and routine health and safety education and training.

State of employee exposure determined. Documented audiometric test results. Availability of safety audits report and recommendations communicated to departments.

EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service by Department

Definition of Service by Division Definition of Customer

Conduct risk measurement to quantify the exposure and prioritise the risk. Co-ordinate and arrange hearing baseline screening for identified employees. Audit workplace to determine compliance with safety legislation. Document findings with recommendations to take corrective action

Ongoing December 2007 December 2007

Ongoing

December 2007 December 2008 Ongoing

Good governance Human Resources Management and Development – KPA: Labour Relations To provide professional Human Resources services to all stakeholders which are characterised by equity, fairness, efficiency and transparency. Our services are delivered through highly trained and committed officials and efficient systems thereby enhancing participative and sustainable service delivery to the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality To render an impeccable labour relations advisory service, and to build capacity for all stakeholders on labour related matters All Councillors, Departments, trade unions, communities, employees of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, as well as statutory bodies

Service Level planned

449

Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service Strategic Objectives Research, develop and implement appropriate Labour Relations Policies

Approximately 200 outstanding disciplinary cases in the Public Safety Department To eliminate unfair discrimination in the workplace To promote a culture of tolerance and recognition of all stakeholders as equal partners. Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Actions Deadlines Dec 2008 Divisional audit document of policies, 100% of Labour Relations policies, collective agreements and Council collective agreements and Council resolutions is available. resolutions from disestablished towns are accounted for. o o

Revise Labour Relations policies and submit for approval

Update policies and collective agreements to align them with changed legislation

Labour Relations policies, collective agreements and council resolutions from disestablished towns revised / aligned or rescinded.

Council Resolutions or Corporate Affairs Committee minutes reflects submissions.

Key policies requiring development

Record Policy and council resolution Determine which policies and resolutions require revision or alignment, and which need to be rescinded

• •

Revise Labour Relations Policies and submit for approval Revise, consult and agree on policies requiring development o o

July 2008

Dec 2008

March 2008

Incapacity Night work policies

450

o o

Suspension procedure Overtime



Identify and agree policies requiring development. • Prepare report identifying and / or prioritising issues to be negotiated at Divisional Level. • Submit policies to Corporate Affairs Committee or Council for approval. • All policies and their associate processes and procedures are aligned with delegated powers • Investigate delegated powers and submit reports on requisite amendments on relative industrial relations matters • Review processes and procedures associated with each policy • Determine obligations imposed by delegated powers • Amend processes and procedures to take into account obligations imposed by delegated powers Development of supervisory and managerial industrial relations working knowledge

Develop basis for working knowledge of industrial relations for managers and supervisors

A report detailing the percentage of REMs

June 2008



Ongoing Build and develop capacity for managers/supervisors in industrial relations • Monitor progress on the development of managers /supervisors • Source relevant training from market or develop internally. 100 % of REM trained on required

July 2008

451

working knowledge of labour relations issues

that have been assessed is compiled.

• Source appropriate training modules. • Administer and conduct training. • Assess managers at agreed interval after training. A report detailing the percentage of regional supervisors and managers that have been assessed is compiled.

50% of regional supervisors and managers informed and all training needed for them. • • .

Optimise collective bargaining strategy

Audit reports

Evaluate learning gaps. Administer and conduct training.

Dec 2008 July 2008 July 2008

July 2008 Dec 2008

Identify and determine matters requiring negotiation •

Conduct an audit of organisational requirements • Prioritise and develop necessary reports for discussion. • Submit reports to Corporate Affairs / Council. Availability of training material

Sept 2008

Continuous training of LLF delegates on collective bargaining initiatives and trends in the country

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing

Ongoing

• Identify specific information and training needs of members of the forum. • Formulate learning outcomes. • Design appropriate training or informational material.

452

A documented communication strategy or programme

Develop collective bargaining strategy

Ongoing Formulate and implement a comprehensive communications programme relating to all labour relations related developments • Identify all relevant stakeholders requiring LR information • Establish specific information needs of various stakeholders. • Formulate communication programme Formulate a comprehensive collective bargaining strategy

Development of shop steward competencies as strategic business partners

• Negotiation skills training Submit report on collective bargaining strategy Develop a fully functional programme for full Design, develop and implement a time shop steward. programme to build core functional skills of shop stewards • Identify the key skills required by shop stewards to be effective business partners. • Design specific training interventions

Documented operational guidelines are available. Guidelines to be incorporated in shop stewards programme.

Review role of shop stewards and formulate and implement comprehensive working guidelines for the role • Formulate the working guidelines taking into account the Organisational Rights Agreement. • Align guidelines with the organisational needs of EMM.

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Dec 2008 Dec 2008

Dec 2008 January 2009

July 2008

September 2008 October 2008 June 2008

453



Formulate a comprehensive working and governance process for shop stewards

• Level of accessibility of shop stewards by managers. • Reduced level of conflict in regions. • Stability of employee relationships at regional level in conjunction with Regional HR Optimise IR services through alternative delivery channels

Report and approval. June 2008

Formulate clear guidelines on the workings of the shop stewards with special emphasis on full-time shop stewards.

Percentage of staff from disestablished towns that have been formally placed into a new position

Align and complete staff migration to new Ekurhuleni Metro structures by finalising outstanding disputes.

June 2008

[Except disputes and people in pool] •

Identify approaches for dealing with disputes in most efficient manner {E.g. Outsource]. • Evaluate each approach to for cost, efficiency and resource requirements. • Source appropriate providers or internal capacity to finalise disputes. Availability of manual. Continuous updates

Compile and maintain a definitive labour relations management manual

Ongoing

• Determine content of manual • Identify core resource material to be included in manual • Develop or source relevant content • Print manual Availability of diverse labour relations information.

Availability and accessibility of labour relations information through technology.

Ongoing - 2008

454

Information is current – continuously updated. Diversity of technologies used.

Availability of IR information to HR practitioners. HR roles and responsibility expanded to include basic LR consulting.

• Review intranet information for relevance and currency. • Update information • Explore use of other technologies that could be used to optimise communication, e.g. SMS Alerts Optimise regional operational IR support to line management by leveraging regional HR competence in IR. • Ensure all regional HR practitioners have a working knowledge of LR. • LR or HR practitioners to attend divisional meetings to update management on any new developments. • Assess the need for further development of LR and HR practitioners.

Deploy a comprehensive strategy for building a positive employee relations workplace culture

July 2008

Reduce workplace conflict through an aggressive focus on conflict management training

Ongoing

Determine learning outcomes to be achieved • Design learning objectives and course outline • Appoint service provider • Administer and conduct training

July 2009



All supervisors and managers have knowledge and skills in presenting disciplinary cases. All managers have

Ongoing - 2008

Implement a strategy for building managerial capacity / capability to present and preside over their own disciplinary

455

knowledge and skills in presiding over cases disciplinary cases. All supervisors and managers have knowledge and skills in • Determine learning outcomes to be presenting disciplinary cases. All managers achieved for building this capability have knowledge and skills in presiding over • Design and learn objectives and disciplinary cases. course outline • Source relevant training from market or develop internally • Appoint service provider • Administer and conduct training • Audit disciplinary hearing cases to determine relative performance of managers • Review skills and knowledge of managers presiding over disciplinary cases Operationalise the compliance to labour legislation and collective agreements.

Divisional Audit identifies full compliance with relevant legislation and collective agreements • IR module on managing poor performance designed, developed and presented. • Aligned content with collective agreements and labour legislation. • Training focuses on developing competence in “corrective discipline”. • Module clearly details managerial responsibility for managing people. • Managers held accountable for managing poor performance • Disputes are reduced by 10% annually.

June 2008 July 2008 July 2008 July 2008 Dec 2008 January 2009

January 2008

Appoint and develop competent presenting and presiding officers

July 2008

Formulate and implement an effective communication strategy for communicating and advocating compliance with all labour relations policies, collective agreements and council resolutions.

July 2008

• Identify all relevant stakeholders that should be aware of the need for compliance. • Conduct an assessment of the council structures and if a need exists set up communication structures within the regions and CCC’s. • Review communication structures within regions and CCC’s

Dec 2008 December 2008

July 2009

456

• Formulate comprehensive strategies for managers to improve workplace performance through the appropriate application of discipline. • Develop managers skills in applying discipline as it relates to performance • Assess the need for further development of managers

December 2008 January 2009

KPA: EMPLOYMENT EQUITY AND TRANSFORMATION EMM GDS Focus Area GOOD GOVERNANCE Service Delivery Department Human Resources Management & Development: Employment Equity and Transformation Division Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned

To provide professional Human Resources Services to all stakeholders which are characterised by equity, fairness, efficiency and transparency All EMM Departments, employees, organised labour, statutory bodies,business  EMM Departments Sensitise Departments on the requirements of the Employment Equity Act, 55 of 1998 To guide and monitor EMM Departments in the implementation of employment equity  Employees Provide information and advice on employment equity  Organised Labour Consult with Organised Labour on issues of employment equity

Backlog Figures

 Statutory Bodies Compile information on the progress made by Council in implementing the requirements of the Employment Equity Act, 55 of 1998 and submit a report to the Department of Labour on an annual basis. Employment Equity Plan to be approved by Council Development of the following Policies:

457

 Employment Equity Policy  Disability in the Workplace Policy  Management of Diversity Policy Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objective RESEARCH, DEVELOP AND IMPLEMENT APPROPRIATE EMPLOYMENT EQUITY AND TRANSFORMATION POLICIES

Development of Employment Equity related Policies Ensure effective implementation of the Employment Equity Plan by EMM departments Ensure that all Departments adhere to the set numerical targets during recruitment, selection and training.

Key Performance Indicator

Measurable Performance targets/Actions

All EE & T policies and their Development of the following associate processes and Employment Equity and Transformation procedures meet transformation related policies: requirements: • • •

Employment Equity Policy Disability Policy Management of Diversity strategy

Annual Targets / Deadlines

Dec 2007

o Research relevant information o Develop identified policies o Monitor and evaluate the implementation processes

458

All HR policies, processes and procedures reviewed in line with the Employment Equity Act and documented

Training Statistics and Attendance records reflect attendance as a percentage of total number of employees.

o Review processes and July 2007 procedures associated with each policy in order to identify employment barriers which adversely affect people from designated groups. o Determine impact on other HRM&D functions. o Amend processes and procedures to take into account requirements in other HRM&D areas. All departments trained on approved EE & T policies and procedures

Dec 2007

o Design relevant training objectives and course outlines. o Source appropriate training interventions. o Schedule training. o Conduct training.

459

A documented EE plan is compiled. Key stakeholders have had input into plan. Plan has been approved for submission.

Facilitate preparation and thereafter monitor implementation of the Employment Equity Plan.

Ongoing

o Formulate EE plan framework for departments. o Communication information on EE Plan to employees. o Consult relevant stakeholders o Conduct a workforce profile analysis. o Consolidate departmental plans and submit to Council. o Establish and ensure functional excellence of EE consultative committee.

Operationalise the compliance requirements of the Employment Equity Act. EE Plan is revised where required. Compliance report has been prepared and submitted to DoL by due date (01 October, annually).

Prepare and submit employment equity report in accordance with the requirements of section 21 of the Employment Equity Act

Annually

Collect statistical data from all SDCs. o Conduct an audit on compliance to Employment Equity. o Prepare a report in the format prescribed by DoL. o

460

Documented targets are agreed and implemented.

Compile a comprehensive employment equity scorecard

An updated Employment Equity scorecard is available.

Dec 2007 Scorecard outlines a comprehensive set of numerical targets to achieve the equitable representation of PDGs within each of the occupational categories and levels in the workplace o Conduct an analysis to determine underrepresentation of PDGs. o Monitor the implementation of the set numerical goals by each department. o Consolidate targets and include in EE Plan. o Scorecard identified and reviewed, tracks and reports on key equity indicators annually. o Identify and agree on key scorecard indicators to track. o Establish an EMM benchmark for current status relative to indicators. o Track / monitor progress against indicators. o Report progress to Council.

Annually

461

EE Culture Assessment is documented. o Determine / measure organisational culture pertaining to employment equity. o Research appropriate practices to determine / measure organisational culture. o Formulate measurement instrument to determine current organisation culture pertaining to EE. o Administer measurement tool. Trends Analysis documented in o Scorecard provides insight scorecard into trends relative to agreed targets as well as market comparisons. o Analyse qualitative data to determine trends on specific indicators. o Establish whether trends are positive or negative. o Compare relative to market where relevant.

July 2008

July 2008

462

Dec 2007, thereafter ongoing o Scorecard trends are proactively analysed to determine and eliminate barriers preventing the advancement of employment equity. o Where necessary, conduct further qualitative studies to determine any barriers. o Analyse information to identify barriers. o Formulate action plans to eliminate barriers. o Monitor and evaluate the implementation of EE Measures. A documented strategy is available. o Formulate a comprehensive Dec 2007 Strategy outlines a range of diversity management interventions. strategy. o Conduct extensive analysis of interventions required to address issue of diversity. o Formulate comprehensive change management strategy to support strategy. Programmes that advance women and o Conduct an analysis of June 2008, thereafter ongoing People with Disabilities (PWDs) are interventions required to identified and researched mainstream gender and disability. o Formulate an implementation strategy based on the above. o Conduct empowerment workshops for Women and PWD. Affirmative action measures are identified to address barriers

Cultivate a culture of valuing diversity.

463

Diversity Culture Assessment Instrument (s) is available.

Minutes of meetings. Issue scorecard available.

EE Consultative Committee leveraged to advance employment equity.

o Determine / measure organisational culture pertaining to diversity. o Research appropriate practices to determine / measure organisational culture. o Formulate measurement instrument to determine current organisation culture pertaining to Diversity. o Administer measurement tool. EECC operational at Departmental and CCC level with a clearly defined agenda. o Define clear agenda for EECC. o Define clear reporting requirements for EECC o Formulate detailed terms of reference for EECC. o Provide support to EECC to execute its mandate.

Dec 2007

June 2008

464

A simple action planning process defined and communicated into committee.

o Process for dynamically actioning the recommendations emanating from the Corporate EECC have been defined, aligned with existing management processes and operationalised. o Document all recommendations emanating from EECC meetings. o Formulate dynamic action plans for recommendations. o Assign departmental accountability for each key action plan item. o Assign EECC champion to drive action item with accountable department.

July 2008

KPA: PROVISIONING AND MAINTENANCE EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

Good Governance Human Resources Management and Development: KPA - Provisioning and Maintenance To render an affordable and sustainable service to our customers in terms of compensation, benefits, recruitment and selection and HR information system. • Departments • Employees • Members of community • Unions • Statutory bodies • Businesses • Departments (high level) • Provision : Provide Human Capital

465

• • • • •

Employees



Advise employees on Compensation/benefits and Recruitment and Selection



Unions (basic level) • Provision : advice, consultation and negotiation • Benefits : advice, consultation and negotiation • Compensation : advice, consultation and negotiation • HR Information system : advice and information • Administration : respond and clarify Members of the Community (basic level) • Provision of employment through processes • Benefits: none • Compensation: none • HR Information system : none • Administration : respond to enquires Statutory bodies (medium level) • Providing : statistics • Benefits : Statistics • Compensation : Statistics • HR Information system : statistics • Administration : respond and clarify





Backlog Figures

Benefits : Provide guidance and delivery Compensation: Effective and efficient Job Evaluation systems HR Information System: Comprehensive HR system and self service Maintenance: Effective and efficient HR administration system.

• • • • • •

Provisioning : policy development and standardisation and human compensation provision Benefits : policy development and standardisation Compensation: standardisation of grading and addressing inconsistencies HR Information system : rollout module, self service and provision of knowledge portal Administration : response to all queries Recruitment and Selection turnaround time

466

Planned improvements in Service

• • • • •

Strategic Objectives

Provisioning

: policy development : standardisation and : human compensation provision Benefits : policy development and : standardisation Compensation: : standardisation of grading and : addressing inconsistencies HR Information system : leave module : self service, and : business intelligence Administration : Turnaround time

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Research, develop and implement Divisional audit document of 100% personnel policies and appropriate human capital (personnel) policies and council resolutions is council resolutions from management policies. available. disestablished towns to be accounted for.

Strategic Objectives

: 2008 : 2008 : 2008 : 2009 : 2011 : 2010 : 2010 : 2007 : 2010 : 2011

Key Performance Indicators

Key Performance Indicators

Implementation of Collective Communicate and clarify Agreement on Conditions of Service implementation of the Conditions of Service.

Measurable Performance targets / Actions Communicate to all employees

Annual Targets + Deadlines •

Determine which policies and resolutions requires revision or alignment and which needs to be rescinded December 2007 • Research, develop, negotiate and finalise 3 policies / procedures / processes and implement. (Retention strategy / policy, and stand-by allowances) June 2008

Annual Targets + Deadlines •



Revision of Collective Agreement from 2007 and beyond (any new set or changes to the Conditions of Service). December 2007 Report to Council

467

• Implement and continuously improve A fully tested and operational Consultation with Departments Human Resources Information System system with minimal interruptions on Business Intelligence and Self Service • Streamline Business process, decrease cost and improve service by empowering users to update and maintain their own information and users able to make better business decisions Implement a credible Human An integrated Human Resources 100% of the fulfillment of the Resources Archival Infrastructure Archival Information System following: • Research • Integrated • Finalisation

Integration of staff from disestablished Placement of employees in the pool towns

Align and complete staff migration to new EMM structure in relation to pool. Implement a professional and A Recruitment and Selection Implementation of the integrated recruitment and selection process that is in line with statutory Recruitment and Selection process requirements Policy and Procedures 70% of critical vacancies to be filled within 12 weeks.

Identify and agree criteria to measure recruitment and effectiveness with key stakeholders

• •

• •



March 2008 Implementation of resolutions May 2008 Finalisation of BI and SS for HR June 2008 Finalisation of BI and SS for the entire EMM June 2009

System must fulfill the following requirements: Integrate existing information in a uniform database June 2008 Allow access to employee data at Regional level December 2008 A standardised information and administrative system. June 2009 Finalisation of placement offers in terms of permanent pool. December 2007 Research a potential index battery December 2007 • •

Research best practice recruitment and selection methods December 2007 Poll key internal customers to evaluate relevance of Recruitment and Selection

468

methods December 2007 Implementation of Job Description Implementation of standardised and Job Evaluation results benchmark of levels of positions administrative process



Evaluate compliance at subsidiary committee and provide a report to the ED: HRM &D

• • • • •



Implementation of payroll audit

An audit report available

Strategy on tangible reduction in Recruitment costs

Conduct audit in terms of Salary budget





Receiving of job descriptions from OM Ongoing Submission of Job Descriptions to PJEC Ongoing Implementation of Results When results are received Assist with queries Ongoing Research and recommendation to Council July 2007 Implementation and workshops Sep 2007 Conduct an investigation regarding all allowances December 2007

KPA: ORGANISATION MANAGEMENT DIVISION EMM GDS Focus Area Good governance and implementation Service Delivery Department Human Resource Management and Development (Organisation Management Division) Definition of Service To provide Management with the necessary information in order for them to make optimum Management decisions that will ensure the optimal utilisation of resources, resulting in productivity enhancement. Definition of Customer Top Management (Level 1-3) Service Level planned All Departments : Organisational Structures • •

Restructuring exercises Development of organisational structures

469

• • • • •

Maintenance of existing structures Organisational schedule maintenance Institutional Review Phase II, III and IV Development of a post coding system Customisation and maintenance of the PEELOW post module

All Departments : Implementation of the Transport Allowance Scheme (ETAS) • • •

Investigations for approval of post categories Investigations into the re-determination of kilometers Maintenance of the Policy

All Departments : Cellular phones • •

Investigations for approval of allocation of cellular phones Revision of the cellular phone policy

All Departments : Productivity • •

Facilitation of productivity awareness programs Facilitation of the measurement of productivity

All Departments : Organisation and Work Studies • •

Conduct investigations on request from departments Development of a standard times and norms database

All Departments: Develop policies •

Conduct investigations on request from departments

Other •

Forms design; development and implementation of a forms register for EMM

470

• Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service

Strategic Objectives To conduct organisational studies

Development of a standard times and norms database

• • • • • •

Restructuring of the Organisation Management Division (June 2007) Allocation of BAT funding for posts to Departments Development and implementation of an Organisation Management marketing strategy (June 2008) Identifying and performing preventative investigations to the benefit of EMM as a whole (ongoing) Productivity improvement publicity campaign and measurements (June 2011) Streamlining of the administrative processes and procedures of the Organisation Management Division (ongoing) • Project management (December 2008) • Project costing (December 2009) • Customisation of the PEELOW post module.(December 2007) Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Actions Deadlines Completion of organisational studies within Complete investigations, obtain Council Refer to monthly detailed the pre-set timeframe as per work approval and implement the resolutions progress report assignment on an ongoing basis by : • • • •

To align the organisational structures of the EMM to the Strategic Plan

Revised Organisational Structures, organisational schedules and database updates

• •



Reviewing and re-designing the Organisational Structures Updating organisational schedules and organisational structures Investigating and compiling of new job descriptions Conducting facilities and ergonomic studies Conducting Feasibility Studies Complete Phase II of the Institutional Review in coorperation with a project manager. Completed Phase III of the



2008-06-30

471

To conduct work studies

To enhance productivity within the EMM

Completion of organisational studies within the pre-set time frame as per work assignment

To measure the current status of productivity within the EMM.

Institutional Review • Complete Phase IV of the Institutional Review by auditing and implementation of organisational structures. Complete investigations, obtain Council approval and implement the resolutions on an ongoing basis by :

Refer to monthly detailed progress report

Conducting method studies Establishing and maintaining standards and norms



Conduct productivity awareness campaigns Facilitate productivity measurement projects within the Solid Waste Sections: Springs and Kwa-Thema To measure the current status of productivity in all departments by measuring productivity in one division of each department per year Development of a database on standard times and norms



Ongoing



2007-11-30



2007-07-01 to 2011-12-31



2011-06-30



Staff Assessments 2006/2007



2008-06-30



Facilitation of the process of the conversion of job descriptions to the TASK format



2007-12-31



• To conduct interventions within preset time frames

2008-12-31

• •



To facilitate Organisation Development Interventions





Compilation of a pro-forma report

472



To develop and review policies for the EMM

Produce “parity” ensured uniform policies within preset time frames

for the OM Division



2007-10-31

Publication of all organisational structures on the Intranet



2007-12-31



2007-07-31



2007-12-31



2007-12-31



2007-12-31



2008-08-30



2009-12-31



Abolishment of all unfunded vacancies



Facilitate the compilation of the Job Descriptions of post level 1-3



Facilitate the evaluation of job descriptions Level 1-3



Development and implementation of a forms register



Development of a prospectus for the OM Division as marketing tool



Investigation into the establishment of a Shuttle service for EMM

• • • •

Review the ETAS Policy Develop an OM Rapid Advancement Scheme Develop a Rapid Advancement Policy for EMM Obtain approval for the Flexitime Policy

2011-12-31 2007-06-30 2007-06-30 2007-12-31

473

Cellular phones • Revise the cellular phone policy

8.4

2007-06-30

COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING EMM GDS Landscape EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

Definition of Customer

Service Level planned

GOOD GOVERNANCE INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING : KPA - Communications; Media and Special Projects • To compile and implement communication strategies and programmes to harness participative cooperative governance. • To provide and maintain excellent Marketing and Communications services to both external and internal clients. • To profile the EMM on a regular basis in order to improve the Municipality’s image and showcase service delivery • • • • • • • •

• •

Internal and External stakeholders. All stake-holders both inside and outside the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality’s borders. They are categorised as: Residential (both formal and informal); Business &/or commercial; Industrial; Other spheres of Government (provincially, nationally and internationally) All the residents of Ekurhuleni and other parts of the country through the media Production of quality and cost-effective publications - Negative publicity - Opposition groups - Service deliveryfailures - Lack of access to services More proactive communication increases to increase percentage of positive and neutral coverage Creating relatively strong media relations

474

Backlog Figures

Planned improvements in Service

• • • • • • • • •

Influence of EMM Media buying Sustaining positive coverage over time Coverage to reflect the EMM’s strategic priorities and commitments Distribution of residents’ newsletters - does not reach all Frequency of internal communications publications - too low to maintain effective corporate communication. More interactive communication programmes with stakeholders. Implementing additional channels of distribution – target date 2007 Higher frequency of internal communications publications – target date 2008 The Strategic role of the Media Management unit is to manage and strengthen the relationship between the EMM and the media. The Media Policy of the Metro indicates the following targets: o Processing information for purposes of devising appropriate messages. o Developing a media strategy for the EMM to ensure meaningful partnerships with the media. o Ensuring the public is constantly informed about service delivery and the challenges we face as the EMM. o Responding to media enquiries promptly and efficiently and ensuring that the Municipality’s message is uniform.

The Media Management unit cannot put a target date on the above challenges because our function is a continuous one. However, it must be noted that we envisage ensuring that we address the challenge pointed out by the President of the Republic that “… as government we have not done really what we ought to have been doing more effectively, which is to communicate about what government is doing and thinking….”

Strategic Objectives

Key Performance Indicators

Measurable Performance targets / Actions

To raise awareness of the services and achievements of the EMM annually

Increased awareness of services, achievements and challenges still faced among external stakeholders on EMM issues

Publish and distribute “Service Delivery” booklets for the EMM

Devise and manage external

Public awareness – increased

1. Maintain the Services Awareness Communications

Annual Targets + Deadlines 2007/2008

Ongoing

475

communication strategies on priority projects of the EMM

awareness on priority projects

Campaign in the EMM 2. IDP Communication Campaign

2007/2008

3. Dolomite awareness campaign

2007/2008

1. Public participation programme

2007/2008

2. Ad hoc projects as per dept needs

2007/2008

Devise and manage implementation of external communication strategies on departmental projects of EMM

Community awareness and public support of the projects initiated. Increased awareness among external stakeholders on departmental projects of EMM

Celebration of national days

Create awareness – increased Creating communication material to popularis these understanding of the importance of all days and their significance, e.g. pamphlets, posters, national days and holidays. etc, in support of line depts. and national and provincial dept initiatives.

2007/2008

Re-align and implement Internal Communication Strategy of the EMM

Realigned strategy and implementation of key projects.

Re-align strategy to be in line with outcomes and recommendations of the audit of 2006/2007, identify key projects and implement

2007/2008

Improve Internal Communication within EMM

Increased awareness among internal stakeholders of projects, policies, procedures etc.



Publish and distribute weekly bulletin to employees of EMM Implement communication campaign to promote EMM employee awards programme. Update, print and supply HR with welcome packs for the EMM induction programme

2007/2008

Publish and distribute bi-monthly internal newsletter to all employees of EMM Publish and distribute monthly external newsletter to all residents Annual corporate publications e.g. Budget

Ongoing

• •

To produce quality and cost-effective print communication products.

Publishing all printed communications materials in line with the Publications Policy

• • •

476

To produce quality and cost-effective electronic communication products

Publishing all electronic communications materials in line with the Publications Policy

• • • • •

Speech, Diaries, Annual Report etc. Departmental reports and pamphlets Monitor compliance with the Publications Policy Improve and expand the Municipality’s Internet Ongoing website Improve and expand the Municipality’s Intranet website in co-operation with ICT Maintain and expand the Photographic Library

To develop and maintain standards of graphic production and visual quality of publications

All published communications products developed conform to the Corporate Identity Policy

Monitor and promote the correct usage of the Municipality’s Corporate Identity on all published material in line with the EMM brand strategy

Ongoing

To identify and arrange internal and external public relations events that will build a positive relationship with target audiences and portray a positive image of the Metro

High quality events / functions

• •

Ongoing

To maintain and develop protocol levels To have the correct protocol in place • for the Metro in order to fit in with at all functions / events international and national protocol / •

Plan and coordinate events / functions Plan and organise events: eg Council Special Events o October Month Programme o Budget Event Mayoral Initiated Events, namely: o Mayoral Business Initiative Meetings o Annual MBI Gala Event o Mayoral Golf Day o Soccer Ball Challenge o Sponsorship events Maintaining Corporate Events Policy as guideline to all Departments Maintaining protocol and etiquette standards at all events and functions Internal protocol training in conjunction with

Ongoing

477

etiquette standards

• •

Host, plan and coordinate itineraries for Well co-ordinated itineraries for high profile Metro visitors in conjunction guests with the Mayoral office



To evaluate and select corporate gifts and promotional items in order to acquire a range of high quality corporate gifts for the EMM



High quality corporate gift collection for the Metro Policy guidelines

• • •

• To improve the image of the EMM by means of positive media publicity and media relations

Driving corporate relationshipbuilding programmes, devising and executing strategies for communication initiatives as well as advising the EMM on media trends and reporting as well as shortcomings from the Municipality’s side Increase the Radio and TV profile of the EMM

• • •



Mayor’s Office Maintaining etiquette policy as guideline to all Departments Developing and maintaining a protocol-correct, catagorised guest list. (Developing an electronic database guest list) Host high-profile international partnership guests in conjunction with the Mayor’s and City Manager’s Office.

Ongoing

Source, evaluate and select EMM corporate gift range Update corporate gift catalogue for the Metro Assist in promoting the gifts via intranet to internal users Ensure adequate stock of promotional items and corporate gifts for EMM and advise on usage in conjunction with the finance department (Stores) as stipulated in the Corporate Gift policy. Maintaining / updating corporate gift policy of Council.

Ongoing

Media liaison through regular visits and interaction with all media (print and electronic) Ensuring the implementation of the media policy Improvement in the number of positive articles written about the EMM each month

Ongoing

Identify potential stories of national interest and create interview opportunities

Ongoing

478

8.5

To make sure that the EMM’s side of the story is told at all times and to measure the media perception of the Municipality Motivate Departments with regards to media handling and the importance of a healthy EMM/Media relationship



Improve on turnaround time to media enquiries and a general improvement on the media monitoring front

Ongoing



Media Training on a regular basis and ensuring attendance of the relevant personnel per department

Annually

Pro-active Media Coverage

• • •

Develop and maintain a media database Monthly Live Broadcast of Mayor’s speech Supplements / Editorials

Ongoing

Update senior management on stories making news headlines that could have a bearing on the Municipality and the type of action that should be taken pro-actively Strengthen the profiling of service delivery, the progress the Municipality makes in achieving the seven key strategic priorities, and the EMM’s efforts aimed at achieving the vision of becoming The Smart, Creation and Developmental City. Efficient Handling of media during disasters



Daily Media briefs to senior management

Daily - ongoing.



Regular contact with the departments and portfolio committees regarding issues of development, services delivery

Ongoing



Establish a Media Advisory Forum for the EMM

2007/08

INTERNAL AUDIT EMM GDS Landscape EMM GDS Focus Area

Good Governance Ensuring existence of internal controls, utilisation of resources and compliance with relevant statutes and policies.

479

Service Delivery Department Definition of Service Definition of Customer Service Level planned Backlog Figures Planned improvements in Service Strategic Objectives Corporate Office (CAE) Promote sound management principles that create a conducive atmosphere for motivating staff

Continuous training and development of staff competency

Internal Audit To be a provider of choice specialising in proactive risk based assurance and consulting, that will enhance the achievement of the Council’s goals in an objective, independent and professional manner. All Departments within EMM and entities Management Assurance, Compliance with Statutes & Policies and Computer & Forensic Investigations N/A To be able to adhere to and/or improve the hours reflected in the audit plan as guided by the profile of risks within EMM and its entities Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Actions Deadlines Conduct team buildings Feedback on staff meetings Awareness of HIV/AIDS Implementing Employment Equity Programme Compile Work Skills Plan Send staff to conferences and seminars Acquiring and maintaining leading edge technologies and methodologies

Year plan Minutes of meetings Minutes of meetings Employment Equity Plan

Half yearly Quarterly Quarterly Annual until 2009

Yearly Work Skills Plan Reports on attended conferences Annual budget

Annually Annually Annually until 2009

480

KPA: MANAGEMENT ASSURANCE To ensure that high risk expenditure transactions are authentic To ensure that all revenue is accounted for Ensure that Council assets are safeguarded KPA: COMPLIANCE Ensure that tender/contracts processes are complied with Ensure that business risk enterprises are assessed. Ensure compliance with relevant prescripts Conduct performance audit

Provide audit service to Springs Market

KPA: COMPUTER & FORENSIC SERIVES Conduct information systems audits Provide audit services to Council entities Minimise fraud and corruption Investigate reported cases through hotline

Improved internal control measures Audit reports to auditees and Audit Committee Improved Internal Control measures Audit reports to auditees and Audit Committee Improved internal control measures Audit reports to auditees and Audit Committee

Implementation of approved audit plan

Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept 2011

Implementation of approved audit plan

Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept 2011.

Implementation of approved Audit Plan

Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept 2011.

Minimise disputes in tender processes Audit reports to auditees and Audit Committee Attendance of Risk Assessment workshops Compile Audit Plan Achieve good governance

Implementation of approved audit plan

Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept 2011 Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept. 2011 Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept 2011. Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 30 Sept 2011

Implementation of approved audit plan Implementation of approved audit plan

Effective utilisation of resources Audit reports to auditees and Audit Committee Improved internal control Audit reports to auditees and Audit Committee

Implementation of approved audit plan

Implementation of approved audit plan

Annually by 01 Oct. 2007 – 30 Sept 2011.

Reduce IT enterprise

Audit Reports

Improved Internal Control measures Minimise high risk areas Improved fraud awareness

Written management comments and audit reports Resolved cases

Reduced turnaround time

Investigation reports

Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 2011 Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 2011 Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 2011 Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 2011

481

Promote good governance through curbing fraud and corruption

8.6

Minimise fraud and corruption

Investigation reports

Annually by 01 Oct 2007 – 2011

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

EMM GDS Focus Area Service Delivery Department Definition of Service

Good Governance Research and Development Supply EMM community with research findings and other statistical information in order to enhance planning and decision-making processes

Definition of Customer

Includes politicians, management, individual departments and the general community within and outside EMM Provide with accurate, relevant and up-to-date research findings and statistical information to a wider community None Research policy yet to be presented to council for approval; a policy that will provide R&D with direction on the development and implementation of EMM research agenda Key Performance Indicators Measurable Performance targets / Annual Targets + Deadlines Actions

Service Level Planned Backlog Figures Planned Improvements in Service Strategic Objectives POLICIES/STRATEGIES Review and submit the research and development policy for approval by Council Develop and implement a research database management strategy

Develop quality assurance strategy for outsourced projects (QASOP) Review the existing strategy for population statistics update (PSU)

Amended and/or adopted research and development policy - Approved research and development policy Adopted research database management strategy

-

A comprehensive strategy

Successfully piloted strategy

Amended/adopted strategy

Strategy that reflects current population dynamics

-

Submission of research and development policy to council - Council resolution to implement the policy Implementation of the research database management strategy

Policy in effect by June 2008

Develop the research database strategy by June 2008 - Implement the research database strategy by December 2008 - Strategy to be reviewed on an annual basis thereafter Develop the strategy by December 2007 Review the PSU strategy by December 2008 -

482

Review the IDP for Research and Development RESEARCH Conduct Metro-wide research projects for planning

Assist departments with their research projects (i.e. surveys, studies, etc)

Develop the Metro urban indicators

Completed IDP review

Research and Development IDP incorporated in the master IDP

Service delivery studies (business and household) - Ekurhuleni population statistics update projects (formal and informal households) Co-ordinate at least 5 departmental research projects on an annual bases

-

-

Update the population statistics

-

-

DEVELOPMENT Conduct monitoring and evaluation during and after the research projects (i.e. Community Satisfaction Surveys: CSS) Strategic Objectives

-

-

-

Availability of indicators for measuring the GDS key focus areas Availability of indicators as per South African Cities Network specifications

Brochures (to give feedback to communities on findings of research projects) Monitoring and evaluation reports Key Performance Indicators

Completed population statistics update projects (formal and informal households) DATA AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT Processing of research-related Satisfied stakeholders (i.e. findings of requests from internal and external the CSS) stakeholders (customers) Develop and maintain a research Fully functional and maintained research database based on the strategy database that is accessible to EMM

Service delivery study reports every 3 years Population statistics update reports every 5 years Determine the project specifications Appoint consultants Implement the QASOP Assess the outcomes and milestones of each GDS-based key focus area Submit indicators to Cities Network as per request

Completed and presented CSS report - Presented/publicised survey findings Measurable Performance targets / Actions Updated population statistics -

-

Positive findings on the CSS CSS report every 2 years

A database consisting of research data, information and reports compiled

Review to be completed by January 2008, and annually thereafter Complete the service delivery studies by December 2008 - Complete the PSU project (on informal households) by June 2009 Ongoing -

Ongoing

CSS to be completed by June 2008 - Presentation of findings is ongoing Annual Targets + Deadlines -

PSU projects to be completed by December 2008

CSS to be completed by June 2008

Database to be completed by December 2008

483

STRUCTURE Management of the Research and Development structure

employees for planning

by and on behalf of R&D and other departments since the year 2000

Reviewed/revised structure

Approved structural amendments

Reviewed equity plan

Met equity targets and in line with government policy - At least 95% implementation of the training budget - Training reports submitted to ETD on monthly bases

Implemented training and development plan

8.7

Structure to be reviewed by June 2008, and annually thereafter Equity plan to be reviewed by June 2008, and annually thereafter At least 95% implemented training plan by June 2008, and annually thereafter

Customer Care Areas and Customer Care Centres Centres

The Institutional Review process the Metro embarked upon during 2005, found several shortcomings that may have had a negative impact on the service delivery capabilities of the Metro. It was concluded that due to various reasons and consequences, the then regional institutional arrangement was less effective than what was intended at time of the establishment of the EMM. Further work on the Institutional Review process and the fact that the three regions would fall away due to inherent shortcomings, the role the establishment of Customer Care Areas (CCAs) and Customer Care Centres (CCCs) could play in service delivery improvement, was further investigated and developed. This led finally to the establishment of seventeen CCAs. Each CCA will be serviced by a CCC. Each CCA comprises of a number of wards. Service delivery in each CCA will be monitored more closely, more effective community participation processes in terms of needs and priorities in respect of the IDP will be created and more effective and regular feedback will be given to, either line departments or the community. Ward Councillors and line departments will thus be put in a much better position to deal with service deliver challenges. The primary function of a CCC is to provide services such as bookings of halls and facilities, payments, access to information, licensing, services complaints, account related services, etc. directly to the community. The CCC will also act as link to the line departments (back offices). The primary function of a CCC is to provide a one stop service to every member of the community in respect of their needs and expectations for primary municipal services. It was recognized that the services the Metro was rendering were fragmented and uncoordinated.

484

The residents were shunted from pillar to post in order to receive basic services. The communities had to travel far to receive government information and services. It is envisaged that, through the creation of CCAs and CCCs, government will provide integrated services and information to communities and ensure that at all times the principles of Batho Pele will be adhered to. . Ward Councillors and line departments will also be put in a much better position to deal with service deliver challenges The creation of CCAs and CCCs is a realization and acceptance that customers have to be taken seriously, and that services have to be brought closer to customers. It is believed that, with the creation of CCAs and CCCs, another milestone has been reached in the commitment of the Metro to not only bring service delivery closer to our communities, but also to make a bigger stride in the quality of services that are being rendered in service delivery.

485

486

CHAPTER 9: MULTI YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN

In terms of the process and the allocation of funds to support the IDP, the following are the guiding factors in ensuring alignment between the IDP and the Multi Year Budget. GDS LANDSCAPES AND FOCUS AREAS The Draft capital budget and the IDP are aligned in terms of the Landscapes and Focus areas as reflected in the GDS 2025. Firstly, all projects in the capital budget should support one or more of the focus areas of the GDS 2025 to start addressing the relevant deliverables and milestones set. Secondly, all projects have been referenced to the departmental Key Performance Area’s (KPA’s) contained in the IDP, and lastly, all projects are linked to the needs identified in the IDP. The detailed projects: • Have a focus on visible service delivery and community development. • Have political involvement in the review process in terms of the relevant MMC and Portfolio Committee. • Take into account the comments raised by the MEC for Local Government. • Are linked to specific objectives set out in the IDP – the Draft Budget shows reference numbers for all capital projects to illustrate the direct link to the objectives as set out in the IDP. • Were prioritized after the “Balanced Budget Model” was used to allocate funds to the various budget segments, as based on the community needs defined in the IDP. The budget allocations contained in the draft budget to be considered by Council at the end of May 2007 are given in graph format hereunder:

487

In respect of the Capital Budget, the resource allocations are summarized per: • Metro Strategic Priority • GDS Landscape as defined in the Growth and Development Strategy • IDP Strategic Priority as identified in the IDP process

488

The Operating Budget address the GDS Landscapes as follows:

The draft 2007/08 – 2009/10 Medium Term Income and Expenditure Framework has been tabled to Council at the end of February 2007. Public comments have been received during March and early April 2007, which is currently being considered. The final 2007/08 – 2009/10 Medium Term Income and Expenditure Framework will be considered by Council for approval at the end of May 2007.

489

CHAPTER 10: PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Changes to the “management of individual’s performance” portion of performance management, which is one of the elements of the Performance Management System, brought about many changes. New Regulations to the Systems Act, published in government notice No. R. 805, (the Regulations) came into effect on 1 August 2006. These Regulations address a number of issues namely “EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS FOR MUNICIPAL MANAGERS AND MANAGERS DIRECTLY ACCOUNTABLE TO THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER, PERFORMANCE AGREEMENTS FOR MUNICIPAL MANAGERS AND MANAGERS DIRECTLY ACCOUNTABLE TO MUNICIPAL MANAGERS, JOB DESCRIPTION FOR MUNICIPAL MANAGERS and PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT PLANS.” They also prescribe the Key Performance Areas (KPAs) under which performance must be measured, and 22 Core Competency Requirements (CCRs), against which individuals must be measured. Three of these CCRs are compulsory. The Regulations indicate the elements and measurements that should be contained in the employment contracts of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to municipal managers. It also indicates what should be contained in the performance agreements of municipal managers and managers directly accountable to municipal managers. The last chapter deals with the components that should be contained in the job description of municipal managers. The section dealing with performance agreements impacts on the EMM Performance Management Policy. Amendments to the EMM Performance Management Policy should be made to address the two main components of the contracts. These are ‘Key Performance Areas of Municipal Managers – Functional’ and ‘Core Managerial and Occupational Competencies – Management and Leadership’. The weighting of these components is prescribed as follows: Functional/occupational components (KPAs) = 80% weighting and CCRs = 20% weighting. Further, each individual area of assessment will be weighted and will contribute a specific portion of the total score. Another very important amendment to the EMM Performance Management System (for individuals) is that of the rating scale, which prescribes a 5-point scale. The Regulation prescribes the following:

LEVEL 1 2 3 4 5

TERMINOLOGY Unacceptable performance Improvement required Performance standard met Performance target exceeded Excellent performance

490

Also prescribed are reviews/assessments that should be conducted quarterly. The first and third quarter reviews may be verbal if performance is satisfactory. Records must be kept of the mid-year review and the annual assessment meetings. Review periods are: First quarter

:

July – September

Second quarter :

October – December

Third quarter

January – March

:

Fourth quarter :

April – June (final assessment)

Matters of reward, performance bonuses and annual salary increases should still be considered by the Remuneration Committee. The Regulations (1 Aug 2006) give some guidelines in this respect.

491

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