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Building Futures 2017-18 School Year

THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY JOURNAL FOR STUDENTS

®

a publication of the Oregon Building Congress // $3.95 //

Issue Sponsored By

Your future begins now INSIDE: SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES • HOT JOBS • EDUCATION RESOURCES

LEARN TO BUILD • • • • •

We will find you a job in construction. Earn as you learn with on-the-job training as an apprentice in the craft of your choice. Graduate debt free because the education is free. Create your legacy while helping build your community. Choose from 8 construction crafts or change to a new craft with ease.

503-256-7300 www.nwcoc.com

Building Futures

®

2017-18 School Year Vol. 20 Issue 1

Distributed by: Oregon Building Congress 9450 S .W . Commerce Circle, Suite 260 Wilsonville, Oregon 97070 Phone: 503-685-8313 Fax: 503-682-1696 e-mail: [email protected] .com www .obcweb .com OBC Executive Director: Tom Goodhue Publisher: Nick Bjork Project Coordinator: Theresa McKinlay Design: Brett Murray Advertising Sales: Bill Beyer and Linda Warnock

Building Futures

®

2016-17 School Year

E ngineer

4

H ot

8

is changing the world , one project at a time jobs : W ork environments , how to get your foot in the door , jobs outlook and pay

Published by: Daily Journal of Commerce 921 SW Washington St ., Ste .210, Portland, OR 97205 Phone: 503-226-1311; Fax: 503-802-7239 e-mail: [email protected] .com

C areer

I ndex to A dvertisers Northwest College of Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover Pacific Northwest Carpenter Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TerraFirma Foundation Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Oregon & SW Washington Roofers & Waterproofers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Hamilton Construction Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 IUOE Local 701 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Kniferiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 P&C Construction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Oregon Tradeswomen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Associated Wall & Ceiling Contractors. . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Liuna Local 737. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 R&H Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Roofers Union Local 49. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 NECA/IBEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside back cover Oregon State Building Trades Council. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back cover

F rom T rade S chool

pathway in construction industry paved with opportunities

to

B usiness O wnership

11 20

Issue Sponsored By: Welcome to Northwest College of Construction

Northwest College of Construction (NWCOC) is the school of choice for construction craft, technical, safety, supervisory and management professionals. Founded by the region’s four largest construction trade associations, NWCOC meets the education and training needs of the industry. As a private, non-profit technical and career school, the College serves new and veteran craftworkers as well as emerging and experienced supervisors, managers and leaders. A career in construction is not just another job, it’s a promise for an exciting, challenging and rewarding future, so join us in building the next generation of contractors.

BUILDING FUTURES MAGAZINE ONLINE!

Building Futures Magazine can be found online at djcoregon.com/building futures Are you interested in joining the effort to educate young people about the construction industry? Contact Tom Goodhue, Oregon Building Congress executive director, [email protected], 503-685-8313.

THE BOARD

THE ORGANIZATIONS

SPONSORS

BOB CALWHITE, President Pacific Northwest Carpenters’ Institute

Associated General Contractors Contract Administration Fund Associated General Contractors of America Oregon-Columbia Chapter Batzer Inc. City of Portland Construction Industry Training Trust & Affiliated Training Programs Daily Journal of Commerce HVAC & Metals Institute, Sheet Metal Training Fund NECA/IBEW Training Center Northwest College of Construction Oregon/Southern Idaho Laborers – Employers Training Trust Fund Pacific Northwest Carpenters Institute (Oregon-Washington Employers-Carpenters Apprenticeship and Training Trust) SMACNA Columbia Chapter USI Northwest

Andersen Construction Anning-Johnson Associated General Contractors AGC, Oregon-Columbia Chapter, Foundation Bureau of Labor and Industries Contract Administration Fund Earth Advantage Institute Emerick Construction Goodfellow Brothers, Inc. Greater Portland Roofers and Waterproofers, JATC Hamilton Construction HVAC and Metals Institute Intel Corporation Mt. Hood Cable Regulatory Commission NECA-IBEW Northwest College of Construction OCF Joseph E. Weston Foundation Olaf Oja Lumber Company Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division, Oregon and Southern Idaho Laborers Training Trust Department of Consumer and Business Services Oregon Department of Transportation P & C Construction Pacific Northwest Carpenters Institute Plumbing and Mechanical Contractors Association Portland General Electric Portland General Electric Foundation R&H Construction Co. The Safeway Foundation

THOMAS GOODHUE, Executive Director Oregon Building Congress AL DEVITA, Immediate Past President Oregon/Southern Idaho Laborers – Employers Training Trust Fund

DIRECTORS Connie Ashbrook, Oregon Tradeswomen, Inc. Rod Belise, IBEW Local 48 Peter Johnson, AON John Killin, Associated Wall and Ceiling Contractors Sara Martin, Slayden Construction Group Cathleen Massier, City of Portland Frank Wall, Plumbing and Mechanical Contractors Association

2017-18 School Year // BUILDING FUTURES

1

Welcome

From Executive Director, Tom Goodhue

Plan, Design, Build Your Way to a Successful Career! Forget the stereotypes of the past. Jobs in the construction industry are interesting, challenging, rewarding, and, by the way, pay quite well. This edition of Building Futures highlights careers in the construction industry and provides contacts to apprenticeship programs and colleges connected to educational training in those careers. Check out the career pages and see the diversity in the range of job descriptions. All these professions serve a vital role in the build community, working in the ultimate team experience using state-of-theart high-tech tools and equipment. Beyond just the information provided in this magazine and as a

resource for career counseling, consider a partnership with Oregon Building Congress to create a stronger connection with careers in this field. OBC can work with your CTE instructors to enhance the Advisory Committee process and raise the areas of achievement by sharing “best practices” already successfully implemented at other schools. Several schools also have adopted AGC (Associated General Contractors) student chapters, modeled after college-level programs in place across the country. Industry mentors and Oregon State University student chapter representatives work with students to create net-

work connections with employers and guidance to the educational resources needed for students’ career pathway success. Tom Goodhue OBC leverages outside services to enhance the student learning experience and to grow the workforce to meet the nation’s construction needs. Have a special request? Let us know and we can work with you to customize a solution to meet your needs. Call us today at 503-685-8313 or visit us at www.obcweb.com.

Current opportunities for journeyman carpenters and new apprentices:

✔Carpenters ✔Exterior & Interior Specialists ✔Millwrights

✔Piledrivers ✔Scaffold Erectors ✔Tradeshow

Call or view our website for application openings:

(503) 287-3708

www.pnci.org

Affiliated with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America

2

BUILDING FUTURES

//

PNCI-3x4.875-043012

2017-18 School Year

Magazine-BuildingFutures

Pacific Northwest Carpenters Institute 04/30/12

4C

Great Companies Lead to Great Futures. TerraFirma isn’t just another company in the construction industry. Working here isn’t just another job in the trades. We believe in doing things better and shaking things up. Together, we’re doing it. If you’re motivated to be part of a fun-loving, hard-working team, then you belong at TerraFirma. Great people make a great company. So come join us!

Call 503-443-6866 to learn more about career opportunities or visit us online. www.terrafirmafs.com

Sam Tenney/DJC

Moses Clark, a project engineer with R&H Construction, spent three months last summer in Tanzania helping a nonprofit organization develop plans to build an agricultural resource center.

Engineer is changing the world, one project at a time

By Stephanie Basalyga Sometimes you meet people and just know they’re going to change the world someday. Moses Clark has a head start on them. Clark has spent the better part of the past two years juggling a fulltime job as a project engineer for R&H Construction with classes at Multnomah University, where he’s been pursuing a master’s degree in 4

BUILDING FUTURES

//

international development and social justice. But for three months last summer, with the blessing of his employer, he headed to Africa to use his background in design, construction and project management to help a global nonprofit called Grace Ministries International develop plans to build an agricultural resource center in Tanzania. For Clark, who grew up in

2017-18 School Year

Cameroon, getting involved in the project was about more than simply paying it forward or racking up credits toward an advanced degree. Africa has a long history of famines, and more than a quarter of its population qualifies as undernourished. The situation, however, actually has improved since 2008 due in large part to efforts made to increase food production through farming, according to nonprofit group

Our Africa. With the continent’s population expected to increase in the future, continuing to place an emphasis on agriculture and farming to battle hunger is critical. Success in farming doesn’t just benefit local populations, though. Exporting crops means more money for farmers as well as big steps for Africa toward meeting goals to become self-sustaining by 2030 and completely free of dependence on foreign aid by 2050. But farming – and being a farmer in Africa – comes with a complex set of challenges. Easily accessible land can be hard to find in areas like Tanzania. As a result, many farmers are forced to obtain land in remote areas that often can’t be accessed by motor vehicles. With limited financial resources, owners of small farming operations can’t afford to buy tractors or other traditional farm equipment. “You pack in bundles (of your supplies),” Clark said. “People put (crops) on their heads to carry them out.” Many of the farmers in Africa run small operations on limited land. That means they need to make the most of every square inch of soil. But constantly replanting the same crops in the same places can quickly deplete soil of valuable minerals and nutrients, resulting in low crop yields, Clark said. That’s where Grace Ministries’ agricultural education center is expected to make a difference. Once established, the center will conduct research to determine which types of crops grow best in different parts of the area and then make seeds for those plants available to local farmers, while also teaching them techniques, such as crop rotation, to improve the quality and quantity of their crops. “These people are already farmers,” Clark said. ‘They just need to learn techniques to grow more, and grow more efficiently.” The agricultural center wasn’t the only project Clark worked on while in Africa. The first stop on his itinerary was Cameroon, where he helped design a two-story physical therapy building that will allow a hospital on

Sam Tenney/DJC

the edge of town to expand its services. Clark would like to return to Cameroon in the future, he said, to help the hospital continue to grow to better serve its patients. As for the agricultural center, construction of the building is still down the road. Grace Ministries must first find about 100 acres of land for the project, build a larger kiln than the one available in order to produce bricks needed for the building and drum up additional money. There’s also a farm that Clark helped start with some of the locals in Tanzania. His partners are running the operation, including testing several different types of papayas – grown from

Oregon & SW Washington Roofers & Waterproofers Apprenticeship

seeds obtained from ECHO, another global agricultural nonprofit in the area – to determine which species of different fruits thrive during different growing seasons and conditions. For now, though, Clark is busy working on R&H projects and preparing to walk across the stage to receive his master’s degree, even as he looks forward to the day when he can again apply the lessons he’s learned on construction sites – and in classrooms – in Portland to more projects in Africa. “I’m excited to see what the future holds,” he said.

Stephanie Basalyga is the editor of the Daily Journal of Commerce newspaper.

orswroofersapp.com (503) 546.4235

Put a roof over Portland! 2017-18 School Year // BUILDING FUTURES

5

Scholarship opportunities

T

here are hundreds of resources out there to assist you financially in gaining the education and skills required to meet your professional goals in the trades, no matter what you’re aiming to become. In addition to assistance provided by most any apprenticeship program, as well as scholarships offered by companies to their employees’ children, we have compiled a list of scholarship opportunities below. The list isn’t exclusive, so be sure to check with local apprenticeship programs and professional groups on a regular basis to learn about new opportunities.

ACE MENTOR PROGRAM ACE awards scholarships at both the national and local levels. Since 1995, ACE has presented participating students with $14 million in scholarships. To qualify for an ACE scholarship, you must be an active participant in a local ACE affiliate’s project(s) for the entire school year. The scholarship application period is open now and will continue through May. If you have any questions, please contact the National office.

ADVANCED AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION Phone: 503.445.9000 www.advanced-american.com/scholarship/ [email protected] The Schweiger Memorial Scholarship Fund provides annual scholarships through a growing endowment fund, to applicants wishing to pursue educational excellence in construction and construction-related fields.

web.aacei.org/resources/careers-mentoring-center/ scholarships AACE International offers competitive and matching funds scholarships to U.S., Canadian, and International students pursuing a program related to cost engineering/cost management. The competitive scholarships are awarded by the AACE International Education Board and are currently available in various amounts to a maximum of $2,500. AACE International Sections may also offer scholarships through the matching funds scholarship program. Applications received for the competitive scholarships will also be reviewed for inclusion in the matching funds scholarship program. All scholarships are awarded for use in the fall term of the next academic year.

AMERICAN COUNCIL OF ENGINEERING COMPANIES OF OREGON Phone: 503.292.2348

//

ASSOCIATED BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS INC., NATIONAL CHAPTER www.abc.org/en-us/educationtraining/ trimmerconstructioneducationfoundation/ buildyourfuturescholarship.aspx Ten scholarships of $2,000 each will be awarded annually. Only one application per student per calendar year will be accepted. Past scholarship recipients are ineligible.

ASSOCIATED BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS INC., PACIFIC NORTHWEST CHAPTER Phone: 503.598.0522

http://oregon.apwa.net/PageDetails/5243

www.abcpnw.org

The Oregon APWA Scholastic Foundation offers a variety of scholarships that are intended to promote and expand educational opportunities and vocational skills in public works and to support the development of public works professionals. New scholarships in 2016 are the $1,500 Allen A. Alsing Memorial Scholarship to a student in the Civil Engineering program at Oregon State University and a $750 Veterans Scholarship to a student at Lane Community College. The Veterans and the Past Presidents scholarships will rotate to different schools each year. Additional engineering and continuing education scholarships also available.

Students who intend to pursue careers in the building trades and are enrolled in two- or four-year programs and apprenticeships can apply for $1,000 scholarships through Associated Builders and Contractors. ABC’s Trimmer Education Foundation awards the scholarships nationally.

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS, OREGON CHAPTER Phone: 503.297.1005 www.aslaoregon.org

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COST ENGINEERS

BUILDING FUTURES

The council offers a scholarship to applicants interested in majoring in civil, electrical, environmental or mechanical engineering, with a preference for those interested in consulting engineering careers. Students must attend any Oregon four-year college that offers Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology programs in the major fields of study (currently OIT, OSU, PSU, George Fox, University of Portland). Check with your college if unsure of its accreditation. Scholarship automatically renews if renewal criteria met.

AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION – OREGON CHAPTER

www.acementor.org

6

www.acecOregon.org

Contributions are made by ASLA members toward an endowment at the University of Oregon, which then distributes the scholarships.

ARCHITECTURE FOUNDATION OF OREGON Phone: 503.542.3825 https://af-oregon.org SENATOR MARK 0. HATFIELD ARCHITECTURAL AWARD provides $3,500 for Oregon residents entering their final year in any accredited architectural degree program. ROSALIND REED DWIGHT SCHOLARSHIP fund — two $1,000 awards to female architecture students, one at University of Oregon and one at Portland State University. Additional scholarships include pairs of $1,000 awards given each year to female students — one specializing in design and the other in construction specifications — at the University of Oregon. These scholarships are funded by proceeds from the sale of Perky Kilboum”s book about Mary Alice Hutchins.

2017-18 School Year

ASSOCIATED GENERAL CONTRACTORS – NATIONAL CHAPTER https://www.agc.org/learn/scholarships-research The AGC Education and Research Foundation supports the future of our industry. Thanks to the generosity of AGC members since 1968 and visionary leadership from industry leaders, the Foundation is committed to sustaining quality education through scholarships. More than 100 students each year benefit from AGC Foundation scholarships. Since 1970, 3,500 scholarships have been awarded, totaling $9 million.

ASSOCIATED GENERAL CONTRACTORS OREGON-COLUMBIA CHAPTER Phone: 503.682.3363 www.agc-oregon.org AGC works with Oregon State University’s Construction Engineering Management program to award scholarships to minority students enrolled in the program. A second scholarship is funded by an endowment named for retired OSU Professor Hal Pritchett. The scholarship is administered by the AGC of America Education and Research Foundation and typically is awarded to an OSU student.

BUILD YOUR FUTURE SCHOLARSHIP Scholarships are awarded annually to applicants pursuing craft professional training in the construction industry through an NCCER-accredited program or a state/federally approved apprenticeship program in a merit-shop training facility.

HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF METROPOLITAN PORTLAND

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION, OREGON-COLUMBIA CHAPTER

OREGON BUILDING CONGRESS OUTSTANDING CONSTRUCTION ACADEMY STUDENT

Phone: 503.684.1880

Phone: 503.233.5787

Phone: 503.318.8145

www.hbapdx.org

www.orecolneca.org

www.obcweb.com

The association and its foundation are sponsoring the second annual High School Scholarship Competition, which provides awards ranging from $100 U.S. Savings Bonds to $1,000 cash prizes. A Community College Scholarship program established in 2000 by the HBA’s Remodelers Council helps support students who are pursuing careers in residential remodeling. The students must be enrolled in an Oregon community college or the Associated General Contractors Apprenticeship Program.

The association awards an annual scholarship that provides students with $2,000 a year for four years. Students must be associated with NECA or its member firms to be eligible for the scholarship. They can apply the scholarship toward any career they choose to pursue and at any college or apprenticeship program across the country.

HUMAN RESOURCES CONSTRUCTION COUNCIL

http://www.skillsusa.org/membership-resources/ scholarships-financial-aid/national-technical-honor-society/

Each year, OBC offers scholarships to one student from each Construction Academy program at its annual awards banquet. To be eligible for a scholarship, students must have completed an OBC-affiliated construction academy while demonstrating exceptional leadership, academic, technical, and job-related skills. Students must have a clear interest in pursuing a career in the design-build field. Scholarship amounts vary from year to year but all scholarships will be applied to post-secondary education costs, such as tuition, books, tools and gear, etc.

888.622.3720. ext 6915

NTHS awards four $1,000 scholarships to SkillsUSA members at SkillsUSA National Leadership Conference. Two scholarships will be awarded to high school members, and two scholarships will be awarded to college/postsecondary members. To be eligible, students must be active, dues-paying members on both SkillsUSA and NTHS.

http://byf.org/hrcc-scholarship NCCER and its Build Your Future initiative have teamed up with the Human Resources Construction Council to award multiple $500 scholarships each year to help cover training costs.

NATIONAL TECHNICAL HONOR SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP FOR SkillsUSA MEMBERS

PROFESSIONAL LAND SURVEYORS OF OREGON Phone: 503.585.4551 www.plso.org The organization offers scholarships for students enrolled in land surveying courses at any Oregon school.

INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF ELECTRICAL WORKERS LOCAL 280 Phone: 541.812.1771 www.ibew280.org Scholarships awarded by IBEW Local 280 are available to children and grandchildren of members and retired members. Most IBEW locals offer such scholarships, and more information can be found on their individual websites.

INTERNATIONAL INTERIOR DESIGN ASSOCIATION, OREGON CHAPTER Phone: 503.546.1280 www.iida-or.org INDA’s international headquarters offers a revolving circuit of scholarships that are available to eligible students. The organization most recently awarded a $1,000 cash prize through the Uoy Hack Memorial Fund. The local chapter recently established the Bern Cowman Memorial Fund, which will create a scholarship for Oregon student members and research grants for the group’s professional members.

Join the Hamilton Construction Family Hamilton Construction’s greatest strength is our people. We have a team of talented, passionate and dedicated people and they are the secret to our success. Recognized for our skilled workforce and our commitment to excellence, we are growing and looking for new team members.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION www.nawicportland54.org The association’s scholarships are administered by Clackamas Community College through the college’s endowment. Local NAWIC members also contribute to the national association’s education and scholarship foundation.

www.hamil.com 2017-18 School Year // BUILDING FUTURES

7

CAREERS

HAMMERS AND NAILS AND A WHOLE LOT MORE! SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR AND STATISTICS

ARCHITECT

ACCOUNTANT WHAT ACCOUNTANTS DO The accountant performs professional-level accounting work in the maintenance and review of fiscal records. The position requires considerable knowledge of basic accounting principles and accounting functions. This individual is responsible for the general ledger, job cost, bank reconciliations and accounts payable. Additional responsibilities include performing monthly closings, maintenance of accounting files, and preparation/organization of various financial forms, reports, and financial analyses, etc. This individual may be asked to assist with ad-hoc projects and general office support tasks when necessary. These responsibilities and tasks will be coordinated with and supervised by the Senior Project Controller. WORK ENVIRONMENT Most accountants and auditors work full time. In 2014, about one in five worked more than 40 hours per week. Overtime hours are typical at certain times of the year, such as at the end of the budget year or during tax season. HOW TO BECOME AN ACCOUNTANT Graduation from an accredited four-year college or university with a major in the field of accounting or other related field. Experience may be considered as a substitute for this requirement. PAY The median annual wage for accountants and auditors was $68,150 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 11 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. In general, employment growth of accountants and auditors is expected to be closely tied to the health of the overall economy. As the economy grows, more workers should be needed to prepare and examine financial records. Quick Facts: Accountants 2016 Median Pay: $68,501 per year / $32.76 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Could require job-specific training Number of Jobs, 2014: 1,332,700 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 11% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 142,400

8

BUILDING FUTURES

Did you know that more than 6 million people work in the construction industry – making it one of the nation’s largest industries? That’s a lot of people and not all of them are swinging hammers and driving big trucks – cool jobs that those may be. Look beyond the obvious and you’ll discover an industry as diverse as the structures it builds. Opportunities abound for all kinds of skills, talents, and educational backgrounds. Just take a look at some of these constructive career opportunities:

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WHAT ARCHITECTS DO Architects plan and design houses, factories, office buildings, and other structures. WORK ENVIRONMENT Architects spend much of their time in offices, where they develop plans, meet with clients, and consult with engineers and other architects. They also visit construction sites to prepare initial drawings and review the progress of projects to ensure that clients’ objectives are met. About one in five were self-employed in 2014.

BOILERMAKERS WHAT BOILERMAKERS DO Boilermakers assemble, install, and repair boilers, closed vats, and other large vessels or containers that hold liquids and gases. WORK ENVIRONMENT Boilermakers perform physically demanding and dangerous work. Many boilermakers must travel to worksites and live away from home for long periods.

HOW TO BECOME AN ARCHITECT There are typically three main steps to becoming a licensed architect: completing a professional degree in architecture, gaining relevant experience through a paid internship, and passing the Architect Registration Examination. PAY The median annual wage for architects was $76,930 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of architects is projected to HOW TO BECOME A BOILERMAKER Most boilermakers learn their trade through an apprenticeship program. Candidates are more likely to be accepted into training programs if they already have welding experience and certification. PAY The median annual wage for boilermakers was $62,060 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of boilermakers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024,

BRICKMASONS (MASON WORKERS)

Most masons work full time.

WHAT BRICKMASONS, BLOCKMASONS, AND STONEMASONS DO Brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons (or, simply, masons) use bricks, concrete blocks, and natural stones to build fences, walkways, walls, and other structures.

HOW TO BECOME A BRICKMASON, BLOCKMASON, OR STONEMASON Although most masons learn through a formal apprenticeship, some learn informally on the job. Others learn through one- or two-year mason programs at technical colleges.

WORK ENVIRONMENT The work is physically demanding because masons often must lift heavy materials and must stand, kneel, and bend for long periods of time. They usually work outdoors, and poor weather conditions may reduce work activity.

PAY In May 2016, the median annual wage of brickmasons and blockmasons was $41,230. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of masonry workers is projected to grow 15 percent from 2014

BUILDING INSPECTOR

hours.

WHAT CONSTRUCTION AND BUILDING INSPECTORS DO Construction and building inspectors ensure that construction meets local and national building codes and ordinances, zoning regulations, and contract specifications.

HOW TO BECOME A CONSTRUCTION OR BUILDING INSPECTOR Most employers require construction and building inspectors to have at least a high school diploma and considerable knowledge of construction trades. Inspectors typically learn on the job. Many states and local jurisdictions require some type of license or certification.

WORK ENVIRONMENT Construction and building inspectors spend considerable time inspecting worksites, alone or as part of a team. Some inspectors may have to climb ladders or crawl in tight spaces. Most work full time during regular business

2017-18 School Year

PAY The median annual wage for construction and building inspectors was $58,480 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of construction and building

grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs will be very strong because the number of applicants continues to outnumber available positions. Quick Facts: Architects 2016 Median Pay: $76,930 per year / $36.99 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Internship/residency, Number of Jobs, 2014: 112,600 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 7% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 7,800

faster than the average for all occupations. Workers with welding experience and general mechanical aptitude will have the best job opportunities. Quick Facts: Boilermaker 2016 Median Pay: $62,060 per year / $29.84 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 17,400 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 9% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 1,500

to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Population growth will result in the construction of more schools, hospitals, homes, and other buildings. Workers with a good job history and with experience in masonry and construction should have the best job opportunities. Quick Facts: Brickmasons, Blockmasons, and Stonemasons 2016 Median Pay: $41,230 per year / $19.82 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 252,900 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 15% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 37,300

inspectors is projected to grow 8 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Public interest in safety and desire to improve the quality of construction should continue to create demand for inspectors. Certified construction and building inspectors who can perform a variety of inspections should have the best job opportunities. Quick Facts: Building Inspector 2016 Median Pay: $58,480 per year / $28.12 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: five years or more On-the-job Training: Moderate-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 101,200 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 8% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 8,100

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER/MARKETING WHAT ADVERTISING, PROMOTIONS, AND MARKETING MANAGERS DO Advertising, promotions, and marketing managers plan programs to generate interest in products or services. They work with art directors, sales agents, and financial staff members. WORK ENVIRONMENT About 31 percent of advertising and promotions managers worked for advertising agencies in 2014. About 17 percent of marketing managers worked in the

BUYERS/PURCHASING AGENTS WHAT BUYERS AND PURCHASING AGENTS DO Buyers and purchasing agents buy products and services for organizations to use or resell. They evaluate suppliers, negotiate contracts, and review the quality of products. WORK ENVIRONMENT Most buyers and purchasing agents work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week. HOW TO BECOME A BUYER OR PURCHASING AGENT Although a high school diploma may be sufficient for some

CARPENTERS WHAT CARPENTERS DO Carpenters construct and repair building frameworks and structures — such as stairways, doorframes, partitions, and rafters — made from wood and other materials. They also may install kitchen cabinets, siding, and drywall. WORK ENVIRONMENT Because carpenters are involved in many types of construction, from building highways and bridges to installing kitchen cabinets, they may work both indoors and out. The

CEMENT MASONS AND TERRAZZO WORKERS (MASON WORKER) WHAT CEMENT MASONS AND TERRAZZO WORKERS DO Cement masons pour, smooth, and finish concrete floors, sidewalks, roads, and curbs. Using a cement mixture, terrazzo workers create durable and decorative surfaces for floors and stairways. WORK ENVIRONMENT Concrete and terrazzo work is fast paced and strenuous and often involves kneeling, bending, and reaching. Because many jobs are outdoors, work generally stops in wet weather.

CIVIL ENGINEERS WHAT CIVIL ENGINEERS DO Civil engineers design and supervise large construction projects, including roads, buildings, airports, tunnels, dams, bridges, and systems for water supply and sewage treatment. WORK ENVIRONMENT Civil engineers generally work indoors in offices. However, they sometimes spend time outdoors at construction sites so they can monitor operations or solve problems at the site. Most work full time.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS WHAT CONSTRUCTION MANAGERS DO Construction managers plan, coordinate, budget, and supervise construction projects from early development to completion. WORK ENVIRONMENT Many construction managers have a main office, but spend most of their time working out of a field office at a construction site, where they monitor the project and make daily decisions about construction activities. The need to meet deadlines and respond to emergencies often requires construction managers to work many hours.

management of companies and enterprises industry. HOW TO BECOME AN ADVERTISING, PROMOTIONS, OR MARKETING MANAGER A bachelor’s degree is required for most advertising, promotions, and marketing management positions. These managers typically have work experience in advertising, marketing, promotions, or sales. PAY The median annual wage for advertising, promotions, and marketing managers was $127,560 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of advertising, promotions, and marketing positions, many employers require buyers and purchasing agents to have a bachelor’s degree. Most entry-level positions require some form of on-the-job training. PAY The median annual wage for buyers and purchasing agents was $60,700 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of buyers and purchasing agents is projected to grow 2 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. These work is sometimes strenuous, and carpenters experience a higher than average rate of injuries and illnesses. HOW TO BECOME A CARPENTER Although most carpenters learn their trade through a formal apprenticeship, some learn on the job, starting as a helper. PAY The median annual wage of carpenters was $43,600 in May 2016 JOB OUTLOOK Employment of carpenters is projected to grow 20

managers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Advertising, promotions, and marketing campaigns will continue to be essential for organizations as they seek to maintain and expand their share of the market. Quick Facts: Business Development Manager/Marketing 2016 Median Pay: $127,560 per year / $61.33 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Usually have some sales experience On-the-job Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 225,200 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 9% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 19,700

workers will be needed to buy goods and services for business operations or for resale to customers. Employment growth will vary with the type of purchasing agent and the specific industry. Quick Facts: Buyers/Purchasing Agent 2016 Median Pay: $60,700 per year / $29.18 per hour Entry-Level Education: High Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Long-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 443,200 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 2% (Slower than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 7,200

percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects for carpenters should improve over the decade as construction activity rebounds from the recent recession. Quick Facts: Carpenters 2016 Median Pay: $43,600 per year / $20.96 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 945,400 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 6% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 60,400

HOW TO BECOME A CEMENT MASON OR TERRAZZO WORKER Although most cement masons and terrazzo workers learn informally on the job, some learn their trade through a formal apprenticeship. PAY In May 2016, the median annual wage of cement masons and terrazzo workers was $41,230. JOB OUTLOOK Overall employment of cement masons and terrazzo workers is projected to grow 15 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Although

employment growth will vary by specialty, both specialties’ growth will depend on the number of heavy construction and civil construction projects, including roads, bridges, and buildings. Applicants who take masonry-related courses at technical schools will have the best job opportunities.

HOW TO BECOME A CIVIL ENGINEER Civil engineers need a bachelor’s degree. They typically need a graduate degree for promotion to managerial positions. Civil engineers who sell their own services publicly must be licensed in all states and the District of Columbia. PAY The median annual wage of civil engineers was $83,540 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of civil engineers is expected to grow 8 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average

for all occupations. As infrastructure continues to age, civil engineers will be needed to manage projects to rebuild bridges, repair roads and upgrade levees.

HOW TO BECOME A CONSTRUCTION MANAGER Large construction firms increasingly prefer candidates with both construction experience and a bachelor’s degree in a construction-related field. Although individuals with a high school diploma and many years of experience in a construction trade may be hired as construction managers, these individuals are typically qualified to become self-employed general contractors.

percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Construction managers will be needed as overall construction activity increases over the coming decade. Those with a bachelor’s degree in construction science, construction management, or civil engineering, coupled with construction experience, will have the best job prospects.

PAY The median annual wage for construction managers was $89,300 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of construction managers is projected to grow 5

Quick Facts: Cement Masons and Terrazzo Workers (Mason Worker) 2016 Median Pay: $41,230 per year / $19.82 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 252,900 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 15% (Much faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 37,300

Quick Facts: Civil Engineers 2016 Median Pay: $83,540 per year / $40.16 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 281,400 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 8% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 23,600

Quick Facts: Construction Managers 2016 Median Pay: $89,300 per year / $42.93 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: More than 5 years On-the-job Training: Moderate-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 373,200 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 5% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 17,800

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THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT WITH THE OTHER 4 YEAR DEGREE

EARN AS YOU LEARN Start off earning 80% of Journey worker wages Starting wage $25.04 - $28.61 per hour Minimum requirements 18 years of age High School Diploma or GED AVERAGE JOURNEY WORKER ANNUAL INCOME $50,000 - $70,000

THINK ABOUT YOUR FUTURE Health Care for you and your family PENSION

Call 503-650-7721 or EMAIL: [email protected]

The Choice is Yours Career pathway in construction industry paved with opportunities

By Tom Goodhue A career pathway in the construction industry has no right or wrong point of entry. As you can see on the chart on pages 12-13, all career paths can lead to the same ultimate outcome. The choice is yours. If you are not sure of your passion, start at a community college. Keep your options open. Take core classes that would articulate to a four-year university but also allow you to explore different elective classes relating to a profession in construction. You may want to enter the workforce with a two-year Associates Degree. There are several types of jobs available utilizing those skills within the industry. Your future is not

locked in with one career path, you could still move to an apprenticeship program or seek a four-year degree. Work a few years in the industry. Keep your options open. You may be ready after getting your high school degree to enter an apprenticeship program. Training costs are usually paid for by industry contributions with little or no cost to the apprentice. Apprenticeship programs are highly competitive and the applicant should have completed related courses taken in high school and/or be able to demonstrate job experience to enhance their resume. These are starting position jobs in a craft trade usually beginning at 50 percent of journey pay levels with incremental salary increases every six months. In addition to on-the-job training, classroom education is provided at the different skilled craft training centers. Similar to the community college pathway, your options for additional education are always open. You could still move laterally on the chart

to the community college or a fouryear university. The choice is yours. For students who know they want to pursue a four-year university pathway, you can see that there are several careers available from that choice. Remember that you can still pursue the other two routes if you determine at a later time that you changed your mind. Having practical work experience is always something that an employer is looking for. Having direct skills work experience makes you more valuable as a construction manager, engineer, or any of the university-based careers. The key point to remember is to always keep your options open. You are young now and will have many new life experiences that will influence your career decisions. The construction industry offers you that flexibility to explore and fulfill your career growth.

Tom Goodhue is executive director of the Oregon Building Congress.

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COST ESTIMATORS WHAT COST ESTIMATORS DO Cost estimators collect and analyze data in order to estimate the time, money, materials, and labor required to manufacture a product, construct a building, or provide a service. They generally specialize in a particular product or industry. WORK ENVIRONMENT Cost estimators work mostly in offices, and some estimators also visit construction sites and factory floors. They may sometimes work overtime to meet deadlines.

DRAFTERS WHAT DRAFTERS DO Drafters use software to convert the designs of engineers and architects into technical drawings. Most workers specialize in architectural, civil, electrical, or mechanical drafting and use technical drawings to help design everything from microchips to skyscrapers. WORK ENVIRONMENT Although drafters spend much of their time working on computers in an office, some may visit jobsites in order to collaborate with architects and engineers. Most

DRYWALL AND CEILING TILE INSTALLERS AND TAPERS WHAT DRYWALL FINISHERS DO Drywall finishers seal joints between plasterboard or other wallboards, mix sealing compound, press paper tape over joints to embed tape into compound and seal joints, or tape joints using mechanical applicators that spread compound and embed tape in one operation. They sand rough spots, fill cracks and holes in walls and may apply texturing compound and primer to walls and ceilings preparatory to final finishing, using brushes, rollers and spray guns.

ELECTRICIANS WHAT ELECTRICIANS DO Electricians install and maintain electrical systems in homes, businesses, and factories. WORK ENVIRONMENT Electricians work indoors and out, in nearly every type of facility. Almost all electricians work full time, which may include evenings and weekends. Although the work is not as dangerous as some other construction occupations, common risks include electrical shocks and burns, cuts, and falls.

FLOORING INSTALLERS, TILE AND MARBLE SETTERS WHAT DO FLOOR COVERING INSTALLERS DO Resilient floor and decorative coverings workers install, replace and repair all types of carpets, plastic laminates, and other decorative coverings in residential, commercial and industrial buildings, airplanes, ships, swimming pools, highway medians, garage aprons, automobiles and athletic fields. Apprentices learn about products, how to prepare a pattern to absolute tolerances, and to use scribes and dividers for precision work. Floorcoverers use manual and power tools to measure, hammer, cut and shear, spread and stretch, and prepare floors.

GLAZIERS WHAT DO GLAZIERS DO Glaziers prepare and install various types of glass, mirrors, windows and aluminum doors. Construction Glaziers cut, fit and install plate glass windows, mirrors and specialty glass items in commercial and residential buildings. Some glass workers specialize in the fabrication, assembly and installation of glass framing systems for storefronts including doors, architectural panels and sealants. Hand and power tools are used.

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HOW TO BECOME A COST ESTIMATOR A bachelor’s degree is generally required to become a cost estimator, although some highly experienced construction workers may qualify without a bachelor’s degree. A strong background in mathematics is essential. PAY The median annual wage for cost estimators was $61,790 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of cost estimators is projected to grow 9 drafters work full time. HOW TO BECOME A DRAFTER Drafters typically need specialized training, which can be accomplished through a technical program that leads to a certificate or an associate’s degree in drafting. PAY The median annual wage for drafters was $53,480 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of drafters is projected to decline 3 percent from 2014 to 2024. Although drafters will continue to WORK ENVIRONMENT The work is done on residential, industrial and commercial properties, both new and existing construction, inside and outside as well. HOW TO BECOME A DRYWALL FINISHER Drywall finishers gain their training through formal apprenticeship programs or develop their skills through on-the-job training. PAY The median annual wage of drywall finishers was $42,280 per year in May 2016.

percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Overall job opportunities should be good as companies require accurate cost estimates to operate efficiently. Quick Facts: Cost Estimators 2016 Median Pay: $61,790 per year / $29.71 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 213,500 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 9% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 18,700

work on technical drawings and documents related to the design of buildings, machines, and tools, new software programs are making drafters and related professionals more efficient, thus requiring fewer workers. Competition for jobs is expected to be strong. Quick Facts: Drafters 2016 Median Pay: $53,480 per year / $25.71 per hour Entry-Level Education: Associate’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 204,400 Job Outlook, 2014-24: -3% (Decline) Employment Change, 2014-24: -6,200

JOB OUTLOOK Overall employment for drywall finishers is projected to grow 5 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average. Workers with a good employment history and experience in construction should have the best job opportunities. Quick Facts: Drywall and Ceiling Tile Installers and Tapers 2016 Median Pay: $42,280 per year / $20.33 per hour Entry-Level Education: No Formal Educational Credential Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Moderate-Term On-the-Job Training Number of Jobs, 2014: 127,000 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 5% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 6,600

HOW TO BECOME AN ELECTRICIAN Although most electricians learn through a formal apprenticeship, some start out by attending a technical school. Most states require licensure. PAY The median annual wage of electricians was $52,720 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of electricians is projected to grow 14 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. As homes and businesses

require more wiring, electricians will be needed to install the necessary components. The job prospects for electricians should be very good, as many employers report difficulty finding qualified applicants.

WORK ENVIRONMENT Most work is inside with occasional outside work when weather conditions are suitable. Work sites range from clean to dirty. The job requires stooping, kneeling, reaching, stretching and heavy lifting for long periods.

JOB OUTLOOK Overall employment of floor covering professionals is projected to grow 18 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Overall job prospects should be good, and opportunities for floor covering professionals should remain strong.

HOW TO BECOME A FLOOR COVERING INSTALLER Floor Covering Installers gain their training through formal apprenticeship programs or develop their skills through on-the-job training. PAY The median annual wage of floor covering professionals was $39,150 in May 2016. WORK ENVIRONMENT Glaziers work indoors and outdoors. Construction glaziers often work on ladders, rigging and scaffolding. The job requires bending, lifting, carrying, pushing and pulling. HOW TO BECOME A GLAZIER Most glaziers learn their trades through formal apprenticeship programs. PAY The median annual wage for glaziers was $41,920 in May 2016.

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Quick Facts: Electricians 2016 Median Pay: $52,720 per year / $25.35 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 628,800 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 14% (Much faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 85,900

Quick Facts: FLOOring installers, tile and marble setters 2016 Median Pay: $39,150 per year / $18.82 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Learn-on-the-job Job Outlook, 2014-24: 5% (As fast as average) Employment Change: 2014-24: 5,900

JOB OUTLOOK Employment of glaziers is projected to grow 4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Good job opportunities are expected from the need to replace glaziers who leave the occupation each year. Quick Facts: Glaziers 2016 Median Pay:$41,920 per year / $20.16 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Job Outlook, 2014-24: 4% (Slower than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 1,900

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING TECHNICIAN WHAT DO HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING TECHNICIANS DO Heating and air conditioning technicians — often called heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVACR) technicians — work on heating, ventilation, cooling, and refrigeration systems that control the temperature and air quality in buildings. WORK ENVIRONMENT HVACR technicians work mostly in homes, schools, hospitals, office buildings, or factories. Their worksites may be very hot or cold because the heating and cooling systems they must repair may not be working properly and because

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS WHAT DO HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS DO Heavy equipment operators drive, maneuver, or control the heavy machinery used to construct roads, bridges, buildings, and other structures. WORK ENVIRONMENT Heavy equipment operators work in nearly all weather conditions. Workers often get dirty, greasy, muddy, or dusty. The vast majority of operators work full time, and some operators have irregular hours. Some construction projects, especially road building, are done at night.

HEAVY VEHICLE AND MOBILE EQUIPMENT SERVICE TECHNICIANS What Heavy Vehicle and Mobile Equipment Service Technicians Do Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians inspect, maintain, and repair vehicles and machinery used in construction, farming, rail transportation, and other industries. Work Environment Service technicians usually work indoors in noisy repair shops. They often lift heavy parts and tools, handle greasy and dirty equipment, and stand or lie in uncomfortable

INTERIOR DESIGNER WHAT INTERIOR DESIGNERS DO Interior designers make interior spaces functional, safe, and beautiful by determining space requirements and selecting decorative items, such as colors, lighting, and materials. They read blueprints and must be aware of building codes and inspection regulations, as well as universal accessibility standards. WORK ENVIRONMENT Many interior designers work for the specialized design services industry or for the architectural, engineering,

IRONWORKER WHAT DO IRONWORKERS DO Ironworkers install structural and reinforcing iron and steel to form and support buildings, bridges, and roads. WORK ENVIRONMENT Ironworkers perform physically demanding and dangerous work, often working at great heights. As a result, workers must wear safety harnesses to reduce the risk of falling. HOW TO BECOME AN IRONWORKER Although most ironworkers learn through an

some parts of these systems are located outdoors. Working in cramped spaces and during irregular hours is common. HOW TO BECOME A HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING TECHNICIAN Because HVACR systems have become increasingly complex, employers generally prefer applicants with postsecondary education or those who have completed an apprenticeship. Some states and localities require technicians to be licensed. PAY The median annual wage for HVACR technicians was $45,910 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of heating and air conditioning technicians

is projected to grow 14 percent from 2014 to 2024, much faster than the average for all occupations. Candidates familiar with computers and electronics and those with good troubleshooting skills will have the best job opportunities as employers continue to have difficulty finding qualified technicians to install, maintain, and repair complex new systems. Quick Facts: Heating and air conditioning technician 2016 Median Pay: $45,910 per year / $22.07 per hour Entry-Level Education: Postsecondary nondegree award Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Long-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 292,000 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 14% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 39,600

HOW TO BECOME A CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT OPERATOR Many workers learn equipment operation on the job after earning a high school diploma or equivalent, while others learn through an apprenticeship or by attending vocational schools.

average for all occupations. Spending on infrastructure is expected to increase, resulting in many new positions over the next ten years. Workers who can operate multiple types of equipment should have the best job opportunities.

PAY The median annual wage for heavy equipment operators was $45,040 in May 2016.

Quick Facts: Heavy equipment operators 2016 Median Pay: $45,040 per year / $21.65 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Moderate-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 428,800 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 10% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 43,200

JOB OUTLOOK Employment of heavy equipment operators is projected to grow 10 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the positions. Most service technicians work full time, and many work evenings and weekends. How to Become a Heavy Vehicle or Mobile Equipment Service Technician Most heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians have a high school diploma or equivalent. Because vehicle and equipment technology is increasingly sophisticated and computerized, some employers prefer to hire service technicians who have completed a formal training program at a postsecondary institution. Pay The median annual wage for heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians was $47,690 in May 2016. and related services industry. In 2014, about one in four were self-employed. HOW TO BECOME AN INTERIOR DESIGNER Interior designers usually need a bachelor’s degree with a focus on interior design. PAY The median annual wage for interior designers was $49,810 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of interior designers is projected to grow apprenticeship, some learn on the job. Certifications in welding, rigging, and signaling can be helpful for new entrants. PAY The median annual wage for ironworkers was $50,830 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of ironworkers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. The construction of large projects, such as high-rise buildings, is expected to drive employment

Job Outlook Employment of heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians is projected to grow 5 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job opportunities for qualified jobseekers should be good. Quick Facts: Heavy vehicle and mobile equipment service technicians 2016 Median Pay: $47,690 per year / $22.93 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship or long-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 186,500 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 5% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 10,100

4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Designers will be needed to respond to consumer expectations that the interiors of homes and offices meet certain conditions, such as being environmentally friendly and more easily accessible. Quick Facts: Interior Designer 2016 Median Pay: $49,810 per year / $23.95 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 58,900 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 4% (Slower than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 2,200

growth, as will the need to rehabilitate, maintain, and replace an increasing number of older roads and bridges. Job opportunities should be best in metropolitan areas, where most large construction projects take place. Quick Facts: Ironworker 2016 Median Pay: $50,830 per year / $24.44 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 80,100 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 9% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 7,100

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LABORERS AND HELPERS WHAT CONSTRUCTION LABORERS, HELPERS DO Construction laborers and helpers do many basic tasks that require physical labor on construction sites. WORK ENVIRONMENT Most construction laborers and helpers work full time and do physically demanding work. Some work at great heights or outdoors in all weather conditions. Construction laborers have one of the highest rates of injuries and illnesses.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS WHAT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS DO Landscape architects design parks and the outdoor spaces of campuses, recreational facilities, private homes, and other open areas. WORK ENVIRONMENT Landscape architects spend much of their time in offices, creating designs, preparing models, and meeting with clients. They spend the rest of their time at jobsites. About one in five were self-employed in 2014. HOW TO BECOME A LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT Most states require landscape architects to be

HOW TO BECOME A CONSTRUCTION LABORER OR HELPER Most construction laborers and helpers learn their trade through short-term on-the-job training.

work in all fields of construction, and demand for these workers will mirror the level of overall construction activity.

PAY The median annual wage for construction laborers and helpers was $32,230 in May 2016.

Quick Facts: Laborers and Helpers 2016 Median Pay: $32,230 per year / $15.49 per hour Entry-Level Education: None Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Short-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 1,386,400 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 13% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 180,100

JOB OUTLOOK Employment of construction laborers and helpers is projected to grow 13 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. Laborers and helpers licensed. Licensing requirements vary by state, but usually include a degree in landscape architecture from an accredited school, internship experience, and passing the Landscape Architect Registration Examination. PAY The median annual wage for landscape architects was $63,480 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of landscape architects is projected to grow 5 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Planning

LANDSCAPER

requiring frequent bending, kneeling, lifting, and shoveling.

WHAT LANDSCAPERS AND GROUNDS MAINTENANCE WORKERS DO Landscapers and grounds maintenance workers ensure that the grounds of houses, businesses, and parks are attractive, orderly, and healthy in order to provide a pleasant outdoor environment.

HOW TO BECOME A LANDSCAPER AND GROUNDS MAINTENANCE WORKER Most landscapers and grounds maintenance workers need no formal education and are trained on the job. Most states require licensing for workers who apply pesticides or fertilizers.

WORK ENVIRONMENT Many landscapers and grounds maintenance jobs are seasonal, available mainly in the spring, summer, and fall. Most of the work is done outdoors in all weather conditions. The work can be repetitive and physically demanding,

PAY The median yearly wage for landscapers and grounds maintenance workers was $26,830 in May 2016.

PAINTERS WHAT PAINTERS, CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE DO Painters apply paint, stain, and coatings to walls, buildings, bridges, and other structures. WORK ENVIRONMENT Painting requires a lot of climbing, bending, kneeling, and stretching. Most industrial painters work outside, almost always in dry, warm weather. Those who paint bridges or building infrastructure may be exposed to extreme heights and uncomfortable positions.

PLUMBERS, PIPEFITTERS, AND STEAMFITTERS WHAT PLUMBERS, PIPEFITTERS, AND STEAMFITTERS DO Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair pipes that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases to and in businesses, homes, and factories. WORK ENVIRONMENT Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters work in factories, homes, businesses, and wherever else there are pipes or septic systems. Workers must often lift heavy materials, climb ladders, and work in tight spaces. Some plumbers travel to a variety of work sites every day.

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JOB OUTLOOK Employment of landscapers and grounds maintenance

and developing new commercial, industrial, and residential construction projects and redeveloping existing landscapes will drive employment growth. Competition for jobs in the largest and most prestigious landscape architecture firms is expected to be strong. Quick Facts: Landscape Architect 2016 Median Pay: $63,480 per year / $30.52 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Internship/residency Number of Jobs, 2014: 22,500 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 5% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 1,200

workers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. More workers will be needed to keep up with increasing demand for lawn care and landscaping services from large institutions and individual homeowners. Job prospects should be very good. Quick Facts: Landscaper 2016 Median Pay: $26,830 per year / $12.90 per hour Entry-Level Education: None Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Short-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 1,282,000 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 6% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 77,600

HOW TO BECOME A PAINTER, CONSTRUCTION OR MAINTENANCE Although most painters learn their trade informally on the job, some learn through a formal apprenticeship.

all occupations. Overall job prospects should be good, and opportunities for industrial painters and coaters are expected to be excellent, especially in the Gulf Coast region.

PAY The median annual wage of painters was $37,570 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of painters is projected to grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for

Quick Facts: Painters 2016 Median Pay: $37,570 per year/$18.06 per hour Entry-Level Education: No formal educational credential Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Moderate-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 360,500 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 7% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 26,500

HOW TO BECOME A PLUMBER, PIPEFITTER, OR STEAMFITTER Most plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters learn on the job through an apprenticeship. Some start out by attending a technical school. Most states and localities require plumbers to have a license.

faster than the average for all occupations. Construction of buildings which need new plumbing systems should drive demand for these workers. Overall job opportunities are expected to be good, with some employers continuing to report difficulty finding qualified workers.

PAY The median annual wage of plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters was $51,450 in May 2016.

Quick Facts: Plumbers, Pipefitters, and Steamfitters 2016 Median Pay: $51,450 per year / $24.74 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 425,000 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 12% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 49,100

JOB OUTLOOK Employment of plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters is projected to grow 12 percent from 2014 to 2024,

BUILDING FUTURES // 2017-18 School Year

ROOFER WHAT ROOFERS DO Roofers replace, repair, and install the roofs of buildings using a variety of materials, including shingles, bitumen, and metal. WORK ENVIRONMENT Roofing work can be physically demanding. It involves heavy lifting, as well as climbing, bending, and kneeling, frequently in very hot weather. Overtime may be required to finish a job, especially during busier summer months.

HOW TO BECOME A ROOFER Although most roofers learn on the job, some learn their trade through an apprenticeship program. There are no specific education requirements for roofers. PAY The median annual wage for roofers was $37,760 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of roofers is projected to grow 13 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average

SAFETY SPECIALIST

fieldwork and travel. Most specialists work full time.

WHAT SAFETY SPECIALISTS DO Safety specialists analyze many types of work environments and work procedures. Specialists inspect workplaces for adherence to regulations on safety, health, and the environment. They also design programs to prevent disease or injury to workers and damage to the environment.

HOW TO BECOME A SAFETY SPECIALIST Safety specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree in occupational health and safety or in a related scientific or technical field.

WORK ENVIRONMENT Safety specialists work in a variety of settings, such as offices, factories, and mines. Their jobs often involve

SHEET METAL WORKERS WHAT SHEET METAL WORKERS DO Sheet metal workers fabricate or install products that are made from thin metal sheets, such as ducts used for heating and air-conditioning. WORK ENVIRONMENT Sheet metal workers often lift heavy materials and stand for long periods. Those who install sheet metal at construction sites or inside buildings often must bend, climb, and squat, sometimes in awkward positions. Most workers are employed full time.

SURVEYOR WHAT SURVEYORS DO Surveyors make precise measurements to determine property boundaries. They provide data relevant to the shape and contour of the earth’s surface for engineering, mapmaking, and construction projects. WORK ENVIRONMENT Surveying involves both fieldwork and indoor work. When working outside, surveyors may stand for long periods

PAY The median annual wage for safety specialists was $70,920 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of safety specialists is projected to grow 4 HOW TO BECOME A SHEET METAL WORKER Although most sheet metal workers learn their trade through formal apprenticeships, some learn informally on the job or in technical colleges. Formal apprenticeships are more likely in construction. PAY The median annual wage of sheet metal workers was $46,940 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of sheet metal workers is projected to and often walk long distances, sometimes in bad weather. Most work full time. HOW TO BECOME A SURVEYOR Surveyors typically need a bachelor’s degree. They must be licensed before they can certify legal documents and provide surveying services to the public. PAY The median annual wage for surveyors was $59,390 in May 2016.

WELDER

Although most work full time, overtime is common.

WHAT WELDERS, CUTTERS, SOLDERERS, AND BRAZERS DO Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers use hand-held or remotely controlled equipment to join or cut metal parts. They also fill holes, indentations, or seams of metal products.

HOW TO BECOME A WELDER, CUTTER, SOLDERER, OR BRAZER A high school diploma or equivalent combined with technical and on-the-job training is typically required to become a welder, cutter, solderer, or brazer.

Work ENVIRONMENT Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers may work outdoors, often in inclement weather, or indoors, sometimes in a confined area. They may work on a scaffold, high off the ground, and they occasionally must lift heavy objects and work in awkward positions.

PAY The median annual wage for welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers was $39,390 in May 2016. JOB OUTLOOK Employment of welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers

for all occupations. Most of the demand for roofers will stem from roof replacement needs and high job turnover. Quick Facts: Roofer 2016 Median Pay: $37,760 per year / $18.15 per hour Entry-Level Education: No formal educational credential Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Moderate-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 123,400 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 13% (Faster than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 15,800

percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Specialists will be needed to work in a wide variety of industries to ensure that employers are adhering to both existing and new regulations. Quick Facts: Safety Specialist 2016 Median Pay: $70,920 per year / $34.09 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 70,300 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 4% (Slower than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 2,800

grow 7 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job opportunities should be particularly good for sheet metal workers who complete apprenticeship training or are certified welders. Quick Facts: Sheet Metal Workers 2016 Median Pay: $46,940 per year / $22.57 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None On-the-job Training: Apprenticeship Number of Jobs, 2014: 141,000 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 7% (As fast as average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 9,400

JOB OUTLOOK Employment of surveyors is projected to decline 2 percent from 2014 to 2024. Improvements in surveying technology have increased productivity, reducing demand for surveyors. Quick Facts: Surveyor 2016 Median Pay: $59,390 per year / $28.56 per hour Entry-Level Education: Bachelor’s degree Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Less than five years Training: None Number of Jobs, 2014: 44,300 Job Outlook, 2014-24: -2% (Decrease) Employment Change, 2014-24: -900

is projected to grow 4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Despite slower than average employment growth, skilled welders with up-to-date training should have good job opportunities. Quick Facts: Welder, cutter, solderer or brazer 2016 Median Pay: $39,390 per year / $18.94 per hour Entry-Level Education: High school diploma or equivalent Work Experience in a Related Occupation: None Training: Moderate-term on-the-job training Number of Jobs, 2014: 397,900 Job Outlook, 2014-24: 4% (Slower than average) Employment Change, 2014-24: 14,400

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EDUCATION RESOURCES PRE-APPRENTICE PROGRAMS Benson Polytechnic High School www.bensonhs.pps.k12. or.us/construction.php Richard Weber [email protected] (503) 916-5100 Cascadia Tech Academy www.ccskillscenter.com/ construction-technology/ Peggy Leifheit [email protected] evergreenps.org (360) 604-1050 x2158 CAWS: Construction Apprenticeship & Workforce Solutions, Inc. www.caws-pdx.org John Gardner [email protected] (503) 478-7354 Construction Hope www.constructinghope. org Visit website for contact form (503) 281-1234 Job Corps – Oregon www.jobcorps.gov Several locations in Oregon 1-800-733-JOBS (5627)

Oregon Tradeswomen www.tradeswomen.net Kelly Kupcak [email protected] (503) 335-8200 x 22 Portland Community College (Cascade Campus) www.pcc.edu/programs/ apprenticeship/pre-trades. html Stacey Zumwalt [email protected] (971) 722-5650 Portland Youth Builders www.pybpdx.org Ruthie Ditzler [email protected] (503) 286-9350 x254 Reynolds Learning Academy – The Trading Up Program www.reynolds.k12.or.us/ rla/trading-program (503) 912-1576 (east) (503) 667-4673 (west) Rogue Community College www.go.roguecc.edy/ department/apprenticeship (541) 245-7912 800-460-7908 APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS

Building:

Bricklayers www.bac1or.org/ training-education-safety/ apprenticeship Shawn Lenczowski [email protected] (503) 234-3781 Pacific Northwest Carpenters’ Institute www.pnci.org/ apprenticeship.lasso Bob Calwhite [email protected] (503)287-3708 Carpenters, Millwrights, Pile Drivers, Interior/ Exterior Specialists, Scaffold Erectors, Drywall Finisher (Taper) and Trade Show exhibition workers Cement Masons www.cementmasons555. org Craig Smith [email protected] (503) 408-8555 Central Oregon Electricians www.cjatc.org Dave Baker [email protected] (541) 971-6199 NECA-IBEW Electrical Training Center www.nietc.org Rod Belisle

[email protected] (503) 501-5050 Flooring Trades www.finishingtrades.org/ apprenticeship.html John Lawson [email protected] (503) 481-3420 Glaziers https://glazierslocal740. org/apprenticeship/shtml [email protected] (503) 491-7359 Insulators www.insulators36.org/ apprenticeship/ Dave Gamble [email protected] org (503) 255-5124 Ironworkers www.iw29appr.org Jack Fussell [email protected] (503) 775-0877 Oregon Laborers Apprenticeship www.oregonlaborers.com Visit website to apply Line Workers www.nwlinejatc.org Mike Kiessling [email protected] (360) 816-7100

Roads Oregon Futures Bridges Airports

Success Starts Here

www.kniferiver.com/careers Proud of our people, Proud of our projects, Building a Strong America® 18

BUILDING FUTURES // 2017-18 School Year

Northwest College of Construction Northwest College of Construction (NWCOC) is the school of choice for construction craft, technical, safety, supervisory and management professionals. Founded by the region’s four largest construction trade associations, NWCOC meets the education and training needs of the industry. As a private, non-profit technical and career school, the College serves new and veteran craftworkers as well as emerging and experienced supervisors, managers and leaders. A career in construction is not just another job, it’s a promise for an exciting, challenging and rewarding future, so join us in building the next generation of contractors. www.nwcoc.com Sara Gourley, Director of Apprenticeship, [email protected] nwcoc.com Jeff Joubert, Director of Education, [email protected] 503-256-7300 Brick Masons, Carpenters, Concrete Finishers, Construction Laborers, Heating and Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Technicians, Heavy Equipment Operators, Tile Finishers & Setters, Sheet Metal Technicians, Sign Hangers.

Operating Engineers Operating Engineers operate construction equipment such as heavy-duty trucks, cranes, bulldozers, pavers, rollers, excavators, scrapers, loaders and many other kinds of equipment used in constructing buildings, dams, airports and highways. Apprentices may also work as heavy-duty truck and equipment mechanics (Heavy Duty Repairer) and as technical engineer surveyors (Construction Surveyors). Contact IUOE Local 701 Training Coordinator, Deanna Robles, at (503) 650-7701 for more information about the apprenticeship programs available in Oregon and SW Washington.

Pipefitters, Plumbers & Steamfitters www.ua290.org Al Shropshire [email protected] (503) 616-0349 Plasterers Craig Smith [email protected] (503) 232-3257 Portland Community College (Swan Island Trade Center) www.pcc.edu/programs/ apprenticeship Stationary Engineers, Manufacturing Plant Electricians, Limited Maintenance Electricians, Millwright, Industrial Mechanic, Construction Trade General Apprenticeship Stacey Zumwalt [email protected] (971) 722-5650 Roofers & Waterproofers www.orswroofersapp.com Joel Gonzalez [email protected] (503) 546-4235 Sheet Metal Institute www.sheetmetalinstitute.org Kevin Roth [email protected] (503) 257-1022 Signatory Painting Contractors Organization www.paintertraining.orgJim Phelps [email protected] (503) 287-4856 Tree Trimmers nwpowerlinetreetrimmer. org Mike Kiessling [email protected] (360) 816-7100 COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Blue Mountain Community College 2411 NW Carden Ave. Pendleton, OR 97801 (541) 276-1260 www.bluecc.edu/academics/ departments-academicprograms/apprenticeship Construction apprenticeship Electrician apprenticeship Central Oregon Community College 2600 NW College Way Bend, OR 97703 (541) 383-7700 www.cocc.edu/specialcurriculum/apprenticeship Industrial mechanics and maintenance technology Construction trades general apprenticeship Electrician apprenticeship technologies Chemeketa Community College 4000 Lancaster Dr. NE Salem, OR 97305 (503) 399-5000 www.chemeketa.edu/programs/

EDUCATION RESOURCES CONT. apprenticeship/ HVAC/R specialization Plumber specialization Sheet Metal specialization Inside wire electrician specialization Clackamas Community College 19600 Molalla Ave. Oregon City, OR 97045 (503) 594-6000 www.clackamas.edu/ academics/departmentsprograms Construction trades general apprenticeship Electrician apprenticeship technologies Clark College 1933 Fort Vancouver Way Vancouver, WA 98663 (360) 699-6398 www.clark.edu Construction Technology Construction Engineering Clatsop Community College 1652 Lexington Ave. Astoria, OR 97103 (503) 325-0910 www.clatsopcc.edu Construction trades general apprenticeship George Fox University 414 N. Meridian St. Newberg, OR 97132 (503) 538-8383 www.georgefox.edu Civil engineering

Lane Community College 4000 East 30th Ave. Eugene, OR 97405 (541) 463-3000 www.lanecc.edu/apprenticeship Construction trades general apprenticeship Electrician apprenticeship technologies Industrial mechanics and maintenance technology apprenticeship

Klamath Falls, OR 97601 www.oit.edu (541) 885-1000 27500 SW Parkway Ave., Wilsonville, OR 97070 (503) 821-1250 • Civil Engineering • Electrical Engineering • Mechanical Engineering • Mechanical Engineering Technology • Operations Management

Linn-Benton Community College 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW Albany, OR 97321 (541) 917-4999 www.linnbention.edu/ apprenticeship Limited energy technician apprenticeship

Oregon State University 1500 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, OR 97331 (541) 737-1000 Oregonstate.edu • Civil Engineering • Construction Engineering Management • Electrical and Computer Engineering • Energy Engineering Management • Mechanical Engineering

Mount Hood Community College 26000 SE Stark St. Gresham, OR 97030 (503) 491-6422 www.mhcc.edu/apprenticeship Brick masons Carpenters Cement masons Construction craft laborers Electrician Glass workers Heat and frost insulators Ironworkers Plasterers Roofers Sheet metal Oregon Institute of Technology 3201 Campus Drive

Portland Community College Rock Creek Campus 17705 Springville Rd., Portland, OR 97229 (971) 722-6111 www.pcc.edu/programs /bldgconstruction Shannon Baird [email protected] Hilary Campbell [email protected] (971) 722-7344 Associates of Applied Science Degree

• Building Construction Technology • Building Construction Technology: Construction Management Option • Building Construction Technology: Design/Build Remodeling Option Less than One-Year Certificate • Building Construction Technology Portland Community College Swan Island Trades Center 6400 N Cutter Circle Portland, OR 97219 www.pcc.edu/programs/ apprenticeship Stacey Zumwalt [email protected] (971) 722-5650 • Associate of Applied Science in Construction Trades, General Apprenticeship • Associate of Applied Science in Electrician Apprenticeship Technologies • Associate of Applied Science in Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology Apprenticeship Certificates of Completion • Limited Electrician Apprenticeship Technologies • Electrician Apprenticeship Technologies • Manual Trades Apprenticeship • Construction Trades, General Apprenticeship • Mechanical Maintenance

Apprenticeship • Industrial Mechanics & Maintenance Technology Apprentices Portland Community College Sylvania Campus 12000 SW 49th Ave. Portland, OR 97219 www.pcc.edu/programs/civil/ engineering Linda Browning [email protected] (971) 722-8730 Civil Engineering Technology Portland State University 1930 SW 4th Ave., Ste. 200 Portland, OR 97201 (503) 725-4282 www.pdx.edu/cee [email protected] Civil and Environmental Engineering Rogue Community College 3345 Redwood Hwy., Grants Pass, OR 97527 (541) 956-7500 www.go.roguecc.edu/ department/apprenticeship Associates of Applied Science Degrees • Construction Trades-General Apprenticeship • Electricians Apprenticeship Technologies Career Pathways Certificates • Construction Industry Management/Construction Technology: CAD Assistant

• Construction Industry Management/Construction Technology: Construction Helper • Construction Industry Management/Construction Technology: Concrete Laborer Certificates • Construction Technology • Construction Trades-General Apprenticeship • Electrician Apprenticeship Technologies • Electrician Apprenticeship Technologies (Limited) Umpqua Valley Community College 1140 Umpqua College Rd. Roseburg, OR 97470 (541) 440-4600 www.umpqua.edu/apprenticeship Industrial maintenance machinist Industrial maintenance millwright Industrial pipefitter Inside electrician Limited maintenance electrician Manufacturing plant electrician University of Oregon 5249 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403 (541) 346-3631 Aaa.uoregon.edu Architecture University of Portland 5000 N. Willamette Blvd. Portland, OR 97203 (503) 943-8000 https://engineering.up.edu Engineering

“Oregon Tradeswomen, Inc.’s 7-week training program provided me with everything I needed to start my new career: from hands-on training, career counseling, and assistance applying for my apprenticeship.” Tia Vonil Electrician Apprentice OTI offers classes to prepare women for high-wage careers in the skilled construction trades. Contact us for information and get started on your path to a new career!

www.tradeswomen.net [email protected] | 503.335.8200 x 21 2017-18 School Year // BUILDING FUTURES

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From trade school to business ownership A Q&A with Brandon Stowe Brandon Stowe has done it all. He’s owned a business, been a teacher, been in the military, went to college, worked for the state, and even helped his grandpa fix refrigeration systems in mom and pop stores across the south when he was as young as twelve years old. While none of these experiences were more important than the next to get him to where he is now – running Stowe Mechanical Heating and Cooling in Long Beach, Washington – he wouldn’t have accomplished any of it without the skills he’s dedicated his life learning as a HVAC professional. We sat down with Stowe to talk with him about his career, and the importance of the education he received at the Northwest College of Construction in Portland, a craft, technical, supervisory and management education facility where he’s now an instructor.

How did you find out about the Northwest College of Construction?

I worked for a company down here in the Pacific Northwest that was an apprenticeship training sponsor and worked with the Northwest College of Construction. It was a requirement that their employees went through the schooling. When I joined up with the company I’d already had a lot of years of experience in the trades from working with my grandpa growing up, but the state of Oregon requires you to have a journeyman card for journey level work and a limited electricity class B license. When I started, my intention was to just sit through the classes, not pay many dividends to what’s going on, take the tests and get out of there because I already had so much experience. What 20

Luke Whittaker/Coast River Business Journal

Brandon Stowe with his family outside his business, Stowe Mechanical Heating and Cooling, in Long Beach, Washington.

I learned quickly, and what was pretty eye opening, was that even for an experienced individual like myself, there was still so much to learn. Even in year one, when we were learning the basics, the curriculum really filled in the gaps from the things I did know to the things I didn’t.

BUILDING FUTURES // 2017-18 School Year

What got you interested in the trades and this type of work?

When I was younger, my grandfather did HVAC. He used to take me out to his jobsites and let me clean the coils or do other helper work. But what really

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CONTINUED FROM page 20 got me interested in it was anytime he would change out a motor he would have me dissect it the same way you would a frog in science class. I was just fascinated by how reels of copper and metal can form a moving mechanical motor that can drive something or perform a task. At first I was just intrigued, then I started to figure out how it all worked, and that’s when I knew I was interested in it as a career.

You already had a job lined up when you started going to Northwest College of Construction, but did your job opportunities increase once you graduated?

Absolutely. I started the school and the curriculum with a local company, but the licenses, certificate and education I received through the program was the key to getting my next job, as the energy engineer for the State of Oregon. The engineering degree I already had wasn’t a requirement for the job, but what was required was the certificate and licenses. I had a relatively good job, but those licenses, are what got me the career people strive for – a civil job with high pay, good health care, a pension, 401k and the whole nine yards. I wouldn’t have gotten the job without the program. But not only was I able to get the job, but because of the education I got from the Northwest College of Construction, I was able to perform, and be utilized, in the way the state was looking for.

beneficial to transitioning me to where I am at today running a company that’s in its second year and grossing $4 million in revenue.

Outside of your technical skill, what has your experience with Northwest College of Construction taught you personally?

Confidence building in a structured learning environment is important to everyone. We deal with a lot of people who come into these schools and feel as if it’s a level below traditional institutions like a four-year college. So, a lot of the time there are some confidence issues with the person starting the program. They feel like this isn’t as successful as a path as some of their peers. But honestly, after going through this program, these programs are geared to change that way of thinking and to show you the opportunity in your chosen field. Let’s face it, I can teach you a technical skill, but if you don’t have the confidence to go succeed with it, you won’t. I went through a four-year college before I went to the Northwest College of Construction. That shows you that there isn’t a magical pathway or formula. What we try to teach everyone is that you have just as much ability to be suc-

cessful in this world as someone that becomes a nurse, a doctor or a lawyer. A trade doesn’t have a cap or a limit as far as what you can do or what you can earn. The only person that can put that cap on you is yourself.

Lastly, what have been the key differences between the four-year university you went to and the Northwest College of Construction?

For me, both are very positive paths with loads of potential. I would never bash a four-year college or more traditional learning environment. They’re all there to help facilitate your next phase in life. There are positives all around, but with trade schools their aim is to be more specific in what they’re teaching you. And if you look at what they’re teaching you, these are skills that are highly in demand, and will continue in demand. You’re seeing a lot of the workforce in other industries diminish with technology. That’s not happening in the trades. The advantage of these programs is that you’re going to be able to find a job, it’s going to be a job in what you studied, you’re going to be able to work just about anywhere you want to, and it’s going to pay you a living wage.

So you not only got the requirements for the job, you got the skills to actually perform the job once you had it?

Exactly. I was confident to perform all my tasks because we’d gone over them in the classroom, and in the performance evaluation where you’re actually doing the hands-on training. I hadn’t just seen it in a book, I’d done it. Those types of experiences were good for me because I’m an audio and visual learner, but I’m also very tactile.

So how did your time at the Northwest College of Construction help you in what you’re doing now, running your own successful business? There are two courses that really helped me beyond just the technical training. In year one there is a course on communications and how to talk to your clients. Then in year four there is a course on leadership, which teaches you how to be effective running a jobsite, foreman or even a business owner. Both of those courses were very

awcco.org Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association opcmia.org Pacific Northwest Regional Council of Carpenters nwcarpenters.org International Union of Painters and Allied Trades iupatlocal10.org Laborers Union local737.org Go online to learn more about various scholarship opportunities! Build your skills for the future. Start your career today!

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Sam Tenney/DJC

Jon Oldenburg, a pipe layer with Westech Construction, sets a manhole in place while building a pipe trainer at the Northwest College of Construction.

Pipe dream becomes reality

By Garrett Andrews Study hard in school, teachers would say to John Kalkhoven, or you’ll end up a ditchdigger. Kalkhoven is today head of Titan Utilities of Beaverton, and though his field of work is not exactly ditchdigging, he’s worked a long, successful career in the trenches. With the construction labor shortage slamming firms that handle water, sewer and storm lines, he wants more people to study hard – and enter the field of utility construction. Kalkhoven’s idea for a permanent training location for underground utility workers is becoming a reality in the parking lot of the Northwest College of Construction. The pipe trainer is intended to streamline technical and safety 22

training, showcase new products, and help combat a labor shortage affecting the pipe-laying industry as much as any other. The team involved, including sponsors with the Northwest Utility Contractors Association, says the oneof-a-kind device could help educate the entire construction industry and lead innovation. Or, as NWCOC President Bob Strader said, it’s pretty exciting “for a hole in the ground.”

BRAND NEW CLAY

The NWCOC pipe trainer idea started about seven years ago with an emerging construction material and the city of Portland. Portland and most modern cities were once awash in clay pipe. By 1933, around 1,100 miles of terra

BUILDING FUTURES // 2017-18 School Year

cotta was employed in conveying this city’s raw sewage directly into the Willamette River. The product fell out of fashion as technology advanced and plastics took over. Eventually, a product called Vitrified Clay Pipe (VCP) hit the market, made by heating clay until it gains the water resistance of glass. Officials with Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services were interested in its superior durability and lower environmental impact. But VCP was a new product, and a sensitive one at that – it could crack easily if installed improperly. The local contracting community lacked installation experience as well as a reliable supplier. So BES had to step in and become the region’s clay pipe authority, eventually targeting a supplier in

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CONTINUED FROM page 22 the Tacoma, Washington, area and reaching out to the National Clay Pipe Institute for materials and instruction. It offered training sessions to local contractors and even helped devise effective installation methods, senior engineering associate Colleen Harold told Public Works Magazine at the time. “We learned how to work with pipe so that we were the experts, not the contractor,” she said. “We found out, for example, that we couldn’t use chains and nylon straps to handle the pipe because it was too slick and that grippers worked best.” After the city’s construction specifications were amended to include VCP standards, BES began a pair of sewer rehabilitation projects piloting VCP in Portland. By this time, the NWCOC and the NWUCA had been brought into the loop, and an idea started to jell with Kalkhoven.

PERSONNEL TRAINER

Technically speaking, the pipe trainer coming to the NWCOC will be a trench 60 feet long with a big manhole at one end for confined space testing. It will have three levels of depth – 4 feet, 9 feet and 12 feet. At the 4-foot depth a removable grate will allow for instruction on the installation of basins. When not in use, steel plates will cover the hole to allow vehicle parking on top. Accompanying NWCOC training programs will address installation of the numerous varieties of pipe – PVC, precast concrete, ceramic and cast-iron. Corporate reps will instruct workers on manufacturer best practices – to reduce the kind of installation errors that can lead to million-dollar lawsuits. Unlike in other sub-trades that have more formal training programs, instruction in the field of utility contracting has long been old-fashioned – firsthand knowledge passed down directly. Often this would take place in a field behind a supplier’s office. This is because when it comes passing on knowledge, there’s no substitute for firsthand, said Kalkhoven, who as a teenager accompanied his contractor father on jobsites. “You can read as many books as you want,” he said. “But when you see it and you do it, it just learns faster.” This is why NWUCA member firms

Sam Tenney/DJC

Jon Oldenburg, right, signals as James Holmes, operating a front loader, backfills a trench dug for a new pipe trainer being installed at the Northwest College of Construction.

eagerly bought into the pipe trainer, according to contractors and college officials. They report that manufacturers in particular have shown interest, eager to accustom new workers to their unique product features. “It will be a good thing for our industry,” said Dan Vannoy, vice president of Emery & Sons Construction. “There’s certainly nothing similar to this anywhere else.” This week, NWUCA member Westech Construction will donate labor to saw the pavement and perform other prep work prior to what will be about a twomonth construction process involving apprentices in class at NWCOC. With safety being a huge issue across the industry, the trainer will assist with instruction on shoring, caveins, confined space and “competent person.” Contractors have expressed interest in bringing staff members in for safety training. “It gives us a very realistic work study environment for confined space and fall protection,” Strader said.

LABOR PAINS

Since the end of the Great Recession, the college, NWUCA and others in the construction industry have been preoccupied with the next existential dilemma – a generational shift away from the skilled trades. “It is a challenge just finding guys to

do the work,” Vannoy said. Construction is notoriously slow to change, but new products and methods can take hold quick, as Portland’s BES showed with VCP. Since 2010, the city has constructed five projects specifying a total of 62,400 linear feet of clay pipe. Bill Ryan, BES’ chief engineer, estimates about 20 percent of in-service pipe in Portland is now clay (terra cotta or VCP). About one-third of all construction projects in the area involve public works utilities, and Ryan said he notices a definite graying of the utility contracting workforce. “Every day in the field we see a decreasing number of old hands,” he said. Utility contractors report that there’s more to pipe fitting than there might seem, and the margin of error is always slim. All pipe is tested after it’s been laid, and if a line doesn’t “test,” the contractor has to fix the problem – work it won’t get paid for. Mathew Warrington, president of Westech Construction, said pipe fitting isn’t just a craft. Any city street job could potentially involve a snarl of water lines, sewer lines and storm lines as well as conduit and drainage. “There are so many different kinds of pipe and they’re all laid differently,” he said. “It’s not just ditchdigging – there’s definitely an art to it.”

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We are the most progressive, aggressive and fastest-growing Union of construction workers, and one of the most diverse and effective unions providing a skilled workforce to our contractors.

Our members are united through collective bargaining agreements which help them earn family-supporting pay, good benefits, the opportunity for advancement and better lives.

To apply go to www.oregonlaborers.com

Roofers Union Local 49 Advantages of being a Union roofer and waterproofer: • • • •

Great starting pay, $18.53 + $13.12 worth of benefits per hour Health insurance for the whole family Pension that you can retire with A closed union to protect your unemployment benefits during times when you’re not working because of weather or when you’re in school • A formal education in a construction trade, with college credit • Roofer Union Local 49 is the only state approved apprenticeship program for Roofers and Waterproofers. 5032 SE 26th Avenue. Portland, Oregon 97202 Phone: 503-232-4807

Building careers, one project at a time.

Check out our Apprenticeship Programs at: www.orswroofersapp.com rhconst.com 503.228.7177

UNION ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIP EARN WHILE YOU LEARN REWARDING LIFELONG CAREER

Electricians enjoy satisfying and active career and earn up to $40 an hour plus fringe benefits: • Apprenticeship – earn a paycheck while you learn the trade • Full scholarship for training • Comprehensive health and retirement packages

Attend an orientation held every third Tuesday from 4 pm – 5 pm. The NECA/IBEW Local 48 contractor-electrician partnership will ensure you will receive the hard earned rewards found through completing their apprenticeship program. Find out why and how the NECA-IBEW apprenticeship program is the best in the electrical construction industry.

www.nietc.org

16021 NE Airport Way, Portland, OR 97230

North America’s Building Trades Unions

www.oregonbuildingtrades.com

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